CSX Closing Stanley Yard Hump in Toledo

CSX plans to close the hump at Stanley Yard in Toledo, rearrange the schedules of trains originating there and convert the facility to flat switching.

The changes were to begin this week and be phased in over a period o f weeks.

A CSX spokeswoman told Trains magazine that the move will result in the elimination of 34 jobs. The yard will still have 40 workers once the restructuring is completed.

The laid off employees will be train service and maintenance employees, the Toledo Blade reported. CSX employs 360 workers in the Toledo area.

It will be the second time that CSX has reduced operations at Stanley.

It closed in spring 2004 but within days the railroad had resumed flat switching there and it reopened the hump that July due to freight congestion in neighboring rail yards.

Stanley Yard is a former Toledo & Ohio Central (later part of the New York Central) yard and one of two hump yards on CSX in Toledo.

Walbridge Yard, a former Chesapeake & Ohio facility, but its hump is no longer used.

Instead, Walbridge is used to sort auto rack cars and store unit trains of coal, grain and other bulk commodities that do not require en route sorting.

Stanley is the second CSX hump yard to be closed since E. Hunter Harrison became CEO on March 6.

The railroad also plans to cease hump operations at Tilford Yard in Atlanta.

CSX will have two hump yards left in Ohio at Willard and Queensgate Yard in Cincinnati.

CSX is framing the closing of the Tilford and Stanley hump yards as a cost cutting move that will make the railroad more efficient.

Among the trains that originate at Stanley are Q319 to Indianapolis; Q322 to Flint, Michigan; Q392 to Detroit; Q394 to Cumberland, Maryland (via Willard);  Q507 to Cincinnati; Q509 to Chicago; and Q511 to Louisville, Kentucky

It is not yet clear if these trains will now be handled at Willard or continue to be classified in Stanley by flat switching.

The Blade reported that another recent CSX practice, operating symbol trains every 28 hours, ended shortly after Harrison became head of CSX. The every 28 hours starts resulted in trains operating six days a week rather than seven.

The practice had been implemented more than a year ago. At the time, CSX had also combined the operation of some symbol freights.

Harrison is known for his operating philosophy of precision scheduled railroading, which seeks to reduce if not eliminate the number of times that a train is reclassified en route.

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