CPKC to Retain CP Beaver, Shield

Canadian Pacific CEO Keith Creel said last week that the CP Beaver will figure prominently in the identity of Canadian Pacific Kansas City, but would not reveal details of what the locomotive livery will be.

Creel said during an interview with Trains magazine that he has some ideas about how to protect the identities of CP and its merger partner Kansas City Southern.

“We don’t want to get ahead of ourselves or send the wrong signal to the STB (Surface Transportation Board),” he said. “That being said, the answer would be I’ve got some ideas. We’re going to try to protect both companies’ proud histories. That matters.”

Upon becoming CP’s CEO in 2013, Creel brought back the iconic CP beaver and shield.

“Obviously the beaver is near and dear to our hearts,” Creel said. “The beaver will be part of that when it’s finalized; there’s no doubt in my mind.

“So it won’t be a huge retooling of our logo. It will be an enhancement that will honor the KCS team and I think we’ll make them proud to be a part of it. When it comes to locomotives, we haven’t gotten that far yet. That’s something when the time’s appropriate we’ll take a look at.”

Creel also said during the interview that once the merger is completed CPKC will put its 4-6-4 steam locomotive No. 2816 on a business train that will conduct a nearly 3,800-mile tour from Calgary to Mexico City.

Known as the Empress, the H1B Hudson was built in 1930 by Montreal Locomotive Works. Restored in 2001, it last operated in main line service in 2013.

As for the CPKC name, Creel said he chose that name as a way to honor the employees of both railroads.

“To me it’s about honoring our employees and honoring our histories,” he said adding that he understand some have been critical of the name.

In looking ahead to how CPKC will operate, Creel said traffic moving from KCS to Detroit and points in eastern Canada will continue to operate via Chicago.

Once that traffic arrives in Chicago it will move east on trackage rights on Norfolk Southern to Detroit via the NS Chicago Line to Butler, Indiana, and then to Detroit over the former Wabash mainline.

Creel said he envisions traffic growing to the point that a new tunnel will need to be built between Detroit and Windsor, Ontario, to handle double-stacked container trains.

CP owns the current Detroit River tunnel between those points but it cannot handle double-stacks.

Therefore the double-stacked traffic now moves and will continue to move for now via haulage rights on CSX between Chicago and Buffalo, New York, via Cleveland.

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