Posts Tagged ‘Amtrak’

Amtrak Website Gets New Look

July 2, 2015

The Amtrak website has a new look, the first cosmetic overhaul of the site in more than five years.

The new look will change again next year as Amtrak tweaks the site’s elements.

“The refresh is focused on delivering customers with an easier navigation designed to streamline the booking process,”Amtrak said in a statement. “The new aspirational display was designed to inspire customers to experience the unique elements of train travel and easily explore the more than 500 destination served by Amtrak.”

The website includes providing a cleaner look with less clutter, easier navigation and a new design.

The travel planning map features an interactive map overlaying Amtrak routes and stations on top of a Google Map whereby users can enter any address, city, state, or ZIP code to locate the nearest Amtrak station, then enter a destination point to find the most convenient Amtrak route.

The bottom of the homepage encourages membership in the Amtrak Guest Rewards program and has a link to the Track a Train map.

The new website design also seeks to draw attention to special offers and discounts tailored by region based on the location of a computer or device’s IP address.

For example, users located in the Washington, D.C., area would receive discounts on Acela ExpressNortheast Regionals and Auto Train.

The former Routes and Stations tabs are now combined into a new “Destinations” tab, with links to route guides, city guides and vacation packages.

Information about on-board accommodations, meals and baggage policies are under the “Experience” tab.

The “Deals” tab points toward current promotions, regular discounts, multi-ride tickets and rail passes.

Hoosier State to Stay as Amtrak Train For Now

July 1, 2015

The Indiana Department of Transportation announced on Monday that contracts enabling Iowa Pacific Holdings to begin operating the Chicago-Indianapolis Hoosier State on July 1, have yet to be reached.

Amtrak will continue to operate the quad-weekly train, which runs on days that the Chicago-New York Cardinal does not operate.

The announcement came after Iowa Pacific completed a test run last weekend on the route with its own equipment.

Iowa Pacific will furnish the locomotives and passengers cars along with providing on-board service. Amtrak engineers and conductors will continue to make up the operating crews.

Once Iowa Pacific takes over, the trains are expected to have Wi-Fi and food and beverage service.

INDOT officials remain optimistic that Iowa Pacific will be taking over the service and note that a number of snags have occurred to prevent that from happening thus far.

It took four safety inspections of the equipment to be used on the trains before inspectors from Amtrak and the Federal Railroad Administration cleared them to carry passengers.

During a June 5 inspection at Iowa Pacific’s shop in Bensenville, Illinois, FRA and Amtrak inspectors cited equipment problems that had been identified during the first inspection but still hadn’t been fixed.

“We had expected the things that were found wrong in the previous two inspections would be corrected by now . . . which is troubling,” said Amtrak spokesman Marc Magliari said at the time.

Iowa Pacific President Ed Ellis said his company took steps to comply with the safety regulations.

“There was a pin in the air brake chain that was the wrong size that has to be changed,” he said. “That has to be the right size.”

Ellis also said that some federal regulations had changed since Iowa Pacific acquired the cars from Amtrak.

“For example, we now have cars that have separate bins for trash and recycling and we had to build those specifically for these cars,” he said. “Two or three steps were involved because we built them the way we thought they met the standards, but (inspectors) requested changes.

“As the regulations have changed, we’ve worked to comply.”

The rail cars did pass an inspection conducted during the second week of June.

INDOT and Amtrak initially signed an agreement for funding the Hoosier State in October 2013 after Congress stopped funding Amtrak routes that are shorter than 750 miles.

The state and communities served by the 196-mile route agreed to pay Amtrak about $3 million annually.

Ellis said he’s ready to go, but Amtrak is not as enthusiastic.

“Our crew was able to operate the equipment for a test run to and from the location in suburban Indianapolis where we’re told Iowa Pacific will service it,” Amtrak’s Magliari said.

“There are many unresolved issues, and we’ve supplied INDOT with a list of the open issues.”

Neither Amtrak nor INDOT officials would be specific about those issues.

“In addition to the contracts, some documentation needs to be done in terms of the inspections that have taken place,” said INDOT spokesman Will Wingfield.

“And then there’s information that we’re working to obtain from the parties.”

That includes INDOT developing contract language that ensures accountability and consequences for compliance with Amtrak and federal safety standards, an issue that raised by the Federal Railroad Administration in March.

No one will estimate how long it will take to resolve these issues, but some local Indiana leaders still expect Iowa Pacific to take over the train.

“Everybody is still trying to reach that end goal,” Lafayette Mayor Tony Roswarski said. “Whether it’s July first or sometime later, I feel we’re still moving forward.”

In Crawfordsville, Mayor Todd Barton has posted a public celebration he’d planned for Wednesday evening at the Amtrak station.

“We checked with INDOT to make sure everything still looked good and July 1 was still a firm date,” he said. “We will reschedule when they have a firm transition date.”

Wingfield mentioned the transition more than once during an interview with a reporter from the Lafayette Journal & Courier.

“A short term agreement with Amtrak may impact the transition schedule,” he said. “There are many threads that run through this.”

However, Wingfield told Trains magazine that “contract discussions with Amtrak and Iowa Pacific are advanced. As with any such negotiations, it is hard to predict a time duration. We are working with the parties to gather the remaining information and complete some steps in sequence before finalizing and signing the long-term service agreements.”

Petition Drive Seeks Oxford Amtrak Stop

June 28, 2015

An Oxford resident has collected more than 1,000 signatures in support of establishing an Amtrak station in that southwest Ohio community.

Many of those who signed Deb Clark’s petitions also said they would be willing to provide funds or materials to make the station happen, she said.

The city of Oxford is supporting the bid to create a station to serve Amtrak’s tri-weekly Chicago-New York Cardinal, but G. Alan Kyger, Oxford’s development director, said a search committee has not decided on a site.

He did say that the committee is looking at locations on public land, although a privately-owned site would not be ruled out.

The committee has examined five or six potential sites, including between High Street and the former Talawanda High School site on Locust Street.

City officials have declined to divulge the specific locations because they have not spoken with the property owners.

“The eventual decision-makers are going to be city council and Miami University,” Kyger said. “We’re trying to work together on this project.”

Kyger said the search committee intends to make a location recommendation by the end of the summer.

Amtrak gave Oxford and Miami the go-ahead to select a site earlier this year.

The railroad has expressed a willing to serve Oxford, but the city and the university would have to find the site and to pay for it.

The station is expected to be a shelter station with overhead canopies but no amenities such as restrooms.

All Amtrak Indiana Stations ADA Non-Compliant

June 28, 2015

Many Amtrak stations fail to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act, including all 11 stations in Indiana, a Department of Justice probe has found.

Indiana Protection and Advocacy Services, the state’s disability advocacy agency, is one of several organizations around the country that filed complaints against Amtrak with the Department of Justice.

The agency’s executive director, Dawn Adams, says the report it sent to the DOJ was based on extensive inspections of Amtrak stations after the state received numerous complaints.

Adams said the violations included inaccessible parking and inadequate counter height, and even refusal to sell tickets to customers with disabilities.

“If the station at the other end that the person wanted to go to was inaccessible, then rather than making that station accessible, they just refused to sell tickets to people with disabilities,” Adams said.

The Department of Justice says it will work with Amtrak to ensure the stations become compliant. Amtrak has indicated that it will cooperate with the effort.

Oxford Continues Push to Become Amtrak Stop

June 2, 2015

Potential ridership in Oxford, Ohio, is strong enough to merit establishing a station there to serve Amtrak’s Cardinal, city officials say.

The city of Oxford and Miami University will continue to lobby Amtrak to stop the Chicago-New York train in this city located 25 miles northwest of Cincinnati, the nearest station.

Miami University, which has more than 1,400 students from Illinois alone, has been working with the city to pursue the stop for Amtrak’s tri-weekly Cardinal.

Alan Kyger, the city’s economic development director, said the costs for the station would be covered by the city, so it is expected to be little more than a station with overhead canopies.

City officials have not yet projected how much the shelter will cost. “The eventual decision-makers are going to be city council and Miami University,” Kyger said.

Amtrak has asked for information showing the proposed station site, including property ownership information, whether there will be other uses of the facility and what funding has been obtained.

A committee is expected to have recommendations on the station by the end of summer.

NS Train Knocks out Window on Amtrak 30

May 31, 2015

No injuries occurred after a door on a freight car knocked out a window on the eastbound Capitol Limited as it traveled from Cleveland to Alliance early Saturday in Franklin Township of Portage County.

The unsecured door of a Norfolk Southern freight train swung open and damaged two windows of the passing Amtrak train, one of which was pushed inside the train onto an unoccupied seat.

The Chicago to Washington, D.C., train was delayed about an hour. Amtrak crew members  moved passengers from the damaged car to seating elsewhere in the train.

One of the damaged windows was repaired in Pittsburgh and the coach remained unoccupied as the train continued to Washington.

Brandon Tidd, a Northeast Ohio Media Group digital sales representative, was traveling on the train. He was sleeping when he said was awakened by a loud noise that sounded like luggage falling from the overhead rack.

Tidd said he saw the window that was knocked into the seat a few rows behind him.

“The Amtrak crew did a great job at keeping us safe and informed both during and after the incident,” Tidd said.

Preservation, Decay and Functionality Coexist at Toledo’s 65-Year-Old Central Union Terminal

May 20, 2015
The light fixture may be original, but the signs probably are not. They may be battered, but they seem too contemporary for the early 1950s. The light blue seems to match the color of an Amtrak sign, leading me to conclude that this sign was installed when Amtrak resumed service to Toledo in October 1975 after a nearly four-year absence.

The light fixture may be original, but the signs probably is not. It may be battered and bruised, but it seems to be too contemporary for the early 1950s. The light blue seems to match the color of an Amtrak sign, leading me to conclude that this sign was installed when Amtrak resumed service to Toledo in October 1975 after a nearly four-year absence.

I love to look at train stations, love to photograph them, love to look at images of them.

Maybe it stems from how my passion for trains and railroads began as a small child when my mother would take my sister and I to St. Louis aboard a New York Central passenger train.

The excitement that I felt in seeing St. Louis Union Station prompted my enduring fascination with passenger trains and railroad stations. A station is, after all, the portal to the train.

Although I enjoy looking at train stations of all kinds I have a particular fondness for large old union stations, including images made at those stations after they had passed their prime.

Amtrak still serves a few of these stations and in most cases has no need for the level of infrastructure that exists in them. Nor does Amtrak have the money to maintain these facilities at the level of utility for which they were built.

What exists is a combination of preservation, functionality and decay. In some instances, a portion of the station continues to be well maintained and might be quite attractive even if only in a historical or aesthetic sense.

Such is the case with Central Union Terminal in Toledo, Ohio.

Opened in September 1950, Toledo CUT was one of the last depots of its kind to be constructed in America.

It served the New York Central, Baltimore & Ohio, Chesapeake & Ohio and the Wabash although service by the latter did not last all that long after the station opened.

Parts of the four-story structure have been remodeled and/or rehabilitated and look good. Yet if you look around it is clear that other parts have been left as they are and they look it as years of deterioration and neglect have taken their toll.

During a recent visit to Toledo CUT to attend a National Train Day festival, I spent some time looking to document the latter.

I didn’t do this to tell a story of decay and deterioration even if that is part of the narrative.

Rather I saw what I did as a form of railroad archeology. What does what has survived help us to visualize and remember what once was?

I view these images as a way to go back in time and imagine what it must have been like in an era when passenger trains played a larger role in providing transportation in America.

Trains still provide a viable transportation option, but the passenger train culture is far different than it was when CUT opened.

Perhaps some day intercity rail passenger service in Toledo will move beyond its current skeletal form and CUT will need to be re-purposed to accommodate that.

Infrastructure that still looks like it did in the 1950s will get a new look. If so, something will be gained, but something lost at the same time. It is time to enjoy and appreciate the latter while we still have it.

Article and Photographs by Craig Sanders

The front door and waiting area may have been where passengers spent the most time waiting for trains, but it was the concourse stairway up or down to the tracks that was the gateway to the train itself.  With the exception of the doors at the bottom of steps, everything else that can be seen here probably is original. It is Spartan and functional and few people probably paid much attention to it as they descended to or ascended from the platform. The image, though invites thinking about the countless number of people whose footsteps echoed off the walls and experienced every emotion that you can name depending on their purpose for traveling. For some, this was the last stairway they descended in Toledo.

The front door and waiting room areas may have been where passengers spent the most time before boarding trains, but it was the concourse stairway up or down to the tracks that was the gateway to the train itself. With the exception of the doors and some replacement concrete on the steps, everything seen here probably is original. It is Spartan and functional, and few people probably paid much attention to it as they descended to or ascended from the platform. The image, though invites thinking about the countless number of people whose footsteps echoed off the walls and experienced every emotion that you can name depending on their purpose for traveling. For some, this was the last stairway that they descended in Toledo.

Although not always apparent, every structure is designed as it is for specific reasons. I look at this scene and see years of wear and tear as well as neglect and decay. But I also note the wide spaces between the concourse doorways and the concrete support posts at right. It was designed this way for a reason that I can’t fully explain. But with a little imagination I can see passengers cars of the four railroad tenants sitting where tracks have since been removed. I can also see streams of passengers heading for or coming from the doors of the concourse stairways.

Although the reasons are not always apparent, every structure is designed for specific reasons. I look at this scene and see years of wear and tear as well as neglect and decay. But I also note the wide spaces between the concourse doorways and the concrete support posts at right. It was designed this way for a reason that I can’t fully explain. With a little imagination I can see passengers cars of the four railroad tenants sitting where tracks have since been removed. I can also see streams of passengers heading for or coming from the doors of the concourse stairways.

I was attracted to this image by the tunnel-like effect I created by using a telephoto lens. Then I wondered why these cut-outs are here. They are too small to drive a vehicle through or to walk through. My best guess is that these alcoves housed the hoses used to put water in passenger cars. Although no longer capable of proving that function, some remnants of the watering system remain, such as hose supports, on-off handles and pipes.

I was attracted to this image by the tunnel-like effect created by using a telephoto lens. Then I wondered why these cut-outs are here. They are too small to drive a vehicle through or to walk through. My best guess is that these alcoves housed the hoses used to put water into passenger cars. Although no longer capable of providing that function, some remnants of the watering system remain, such as hose supports, on-off handles and pipes.

A close-up view of one of the alcoves that line up to create the tunnel effect described with the previous image.

A close-up view of one of the alcoves that line up to create the tunnel-like effect described in the description of the previous image.

There is no mistake about the heritage of this sign. It probably was put up when Amtrak resumed service to Toledo on Oct. 31, 1975. That was forty years ago. Can it have been four decades? It has been and the signs show it. These signs likely would have been replaced already if Amtrak had more money to spend on image-related matter. But it doesn’t and the signs remain functional so they remain regardless of what message the cracks and faded colors might convey. The most modern touch in this scene is the light bulb.

There is no mistake about the heritage of this sign. It probably was put up when Amtrak resumed service to Toledo on Oct. 31, 1975. That was forty years ago. Can it really have been four decades? It has been and the sign reflects that. These signs likely would have been replaced already if Amtrak had more money to spend on image-related matters. But it doesn’t. The sign is still functional so its remains in place regardless of what message the cracks and faded colors might convey. The most modern touch in this scene is the light bulb.

There is much in this view taken from an abandoned street bridge over the tracks just west of the station that conveys the design of Toledo CUT. The rounded trainsheds and concourse building have not changed that much over the years. But the tracks to the three outermost platform islands have long since been removed and the scene has the feel of unneeded infrastructure that no one wants to remove. Will tracks be put back in here again? Will passengers again walk the platform to and from their trains? Those seem to be questions for future generations to answer with the present generations doing just enough to keep this infrastructure in place so that there will be something to work with if intercity passenger rail service makes a significant comeback.

There is much in this view taken from an abandoned street bridge just west of the station that conveys the design and layout of Toledo CUT. The rounded train sheds and concourse building have not changed much over the years. But the tracks to the three outermost platform islands have long since been removed and the scene has the feel of unneeded infrastructure that no one wants to raze. Will tracks be put back in here again? Will passengers again walk these unused platform to and from their trains? Those seem to be questions for future generations to answer with the present generations doing just enough to keep this infrastructure in place so that there will be something to work with if intercity passenger rail service makes a significant comeback.

Railroad fairs have a long history in America and National Train Day has given some cities an opportunity to reprise this largely lost event. The crowd of onlookers admires three diesel locomotives that serve three distinct functions with a regional railroad, Class 1 Railroad and the country’s only national rail passenger railroad. When Toledo CUT opened, no one thought to paint locomotives in bright colors with an artist’s rendering to honor the veterans even if World War II was less than a decade behind. No one in the 1950s would have thought to promote the idea of “green” or environmentally friendly machines. If neither NS or Amtrak existed in 1950, the Ann Arbor railroad did, although not with locomotives once owned by Union Pacific, another company that existed in 1950 and which painted its diesels in the Armour Yellow still used today. If the onlookers were to look up, they might take note of the boarded up windows on the second floor of CUT. They probably noticed the crumbled concrete at the end of the platform and that the rusty rails of a station track ends rather abruptly. It is far from what this scene looked like in the 1950s, but is representative of how revival and decay co-exist at Toledo CUT.

Railroad fairs have a long history in America and National Train Day has given some cities an opportunity to reprise this largely lost celebration. The crowd of onlookers admires three diesel locomotives that serve three distinct functions with a regional railroad, Class 1 Railroad and the country’s only national rail passenger railroad. When Toledo CUT opened, no one thought to paint locomotives in bright colors with an artist’s rendering to honor the veterans even if World War II was less than a decade behind. No one in the 1950s would have thought to promote the idea of “green” or environmentally friendly machines. If neither NS or Amtrak existed in 1950, the Ann Arbor railroad did, although not with locomotives once owned by Union Pacific, another company that existed in 1950 and which painted its diesels in the Armour Yellow still used today. If the onlookers were to look up, they might take note of the boarded up windows on the second floor of CUT. They probably noticed the crumbled concrete at the end of the platform and that the rusty rails of a station track ends rather abruptly. It is far from what this scene looked like in the 1950s, but is representative of how revival and decay co-exist at Toledo CUT.

If I had to give this image a name it would be “glass.” Glass is the dominant element of the Amtrak Sightseer lounge car in the foreground. That glass is a prominent design element of the passenger car and station building is by intent. Amtrak designed the Sightseer lounges to maximize visible outward and upward. The use of glass block windows is more pronounced when viewing the front of the station and was intended to represent one of the city’s major industries. The liberal use of various forms of glass – glass blocks, plate glass, double-glazed and tempered glass – led journalists to refer to the station as the glass palace. Designer Robert Crosbie incorporated square and rectangular edges to create the geometric pattern that can be seen here. The Amtrak Sightseer lounge, by contrast, prominently features curves.

If I had to give this image a name it would be “Glass” because glass is the dominant element of the Amtrak Sightseer lounge car in the foreground and the station behind it. Both are by intent. Amtrak designed the Sightseer lounges to maximize visible outward and upward. The use of glass block windows is more pronounced when viewing the front of the station and was intended to represent one of the city’s major industries. The liberal use of various forms of glass – glass blocks, plate glass, double-glazed and tempered glass – led journalists to refer to the station as the glass palace. Designer Robert Crosbie incorporated square and rectangular edges to create the geometric pattern that can be seen here. The Amtrak Sightseer lounge, by contrast, prominently features curves.

Amtrak Releases 2nd Veterans Tribute Unit

May 19, 2015

Amtrak has rolled out a second locomotive to honor the nation’s military veterans,

The same livery applied to P42DC No. 42 has been given to ACS-64 No. 642.

Although the locomotive has not been officially unveiled by Amtrak, it was ferried eastward on Sunday and Monday, passing through Northeast Ohio in the motive power consist of the eastbound Capitol Limited on Monday morning.

On Sunday morning, it had left Indianapolis on the northbound Hoosier State after being painted at the Beech Grove shops.

The ACS-64 locomotives are being built in California by Siemens and ferried across the country, usually by the California Zephyr and Capitol Limited.

Marketing Seen as Key to Hoosier State Succcess

May 13, 2015

Ed Ellis has a simple idea how to boost ridership on the Hoosier State. It begins with a marketing effort that is rooted in giving people a reason to ride the train.

He expects to offer highly-marketed travel packages that will take passengers to sporting events and cultural attractions.

Ellis, who heads Iowa Pacific Holdings, told the Journal & Courier of Lafayette, Indiana, that travelers can be sorted into three groups: Those who need to get somewhere in a hurry, those who just need to get somewhere and those who are looking for a reason to go. The latter are much on Ellis’ mind these days.

“The way they ran trains back in the day, they spent a lot of time thinking about events and reasons people need to ride the train,” he said. “Substantial costs of running trains were paid for by people who didn’t have to go but wanted to go.”

Iowa Pacific is in the process of hiring employees to support the Hoosier State, including a marketing manager who will plan trips.

It won’t be just Hoosiers traveling to Chicago for the day. “You can be sure we’ll be selling Purdue football packages,” Ellis said.

Iowa Pacific will provide and maintain the passenger cars for the quad-weekly Chicago-Indianapolis train that will continue to be operated by Amtrak and funded by the Indiana Department of Transportation and the online communities that it serves.

The same route and communities are also served by Amtrak’s Chicago-New York Cardinal, which operates on the three days a week that the Hoosier State does not run.

Iowa Pacific also will provide food and beverage service, something that has had scant availability in recent years. Amtrak will provide engineers and conductors, and sell tickets.

Ellis said that he saw an opportunity throughout months of sometimes contentious negotiations among INDOT, Amtrak and the Federal Railroad Administration over operating the Hoosier State.

He is optimistic that the Chicago-Indianapolis route can become a self-supporting enterprise.

That vision is rooted in a railroad career that included a five-year tenure as a vice president at Amtrak between 996 to 2000.

As an example of what he meant by creating demand, Ellis said his company, which is also in the business of hauling freight, built an outdoor concert venue on top of a mountain near Alamosa, Colorado. The only way to get there was to ride an excursion train that Iowa Pacific operates.

“We created that (concert venue) to give people a reason to ride the train,” he said.

Ellis understand what he is up against marketing a train that doesn’t get anywhere in a hurry.

“What has to happen when you have a train that doesn’t provide fast frequent on-time service is you have to figure out how to get more people on the train,” he said.

Increasing service on the route is going to take about $500 million to be used for rebuilding the tracks. Finding that money will be tough going.

Yet such work is necessary if Ellis is going to reach his goal of 12 passenger trains a day.

Brian Farkas is a locomotive engineer and chairman of the Indiana legislative board of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and Trainmen.

“Some of his ideas are good, but I’m curious to see how he’s going to get $500 million when our legislators are reluctant to fund $3 million for the train,” Farkas said.

Some have pointed toward federal grants, including the Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery program.

“There is a renewed willingness on the part of Amtrak, CSX and INDOT to pursue economic development funding, including TIGER grants, to improve the rail infrastructure,” said Greater Lafayette Commerce member Arvid Olson.

“We do have a history of cooperation with railroads in this community,” added Liz Solberg, who oversaw Lafayette’s relocation of Norfolk Southern and CSX tracks to create a rail corridor adjacent to the Wabash River.

Douglas Yerkeson, a rail supporter and partner at Faegre Baker Daniels law firm in Indianapolis, is impressed with Ellis’ approach.

“Having a balanced transportation system is critical to economic development for the state,” he said. “And given the government of Indiana’s interest in partnering with a private company, this may be the impetus for culture change.”

Dana Smith, retired head of Greater Lafayette Chamber of Commerce, agreed. “If Iowa Pacific can pull this off, it’s going to be an absolute positive for this community,” he said.

Last year, Vicki Burch, a West Lafayette city councilwoman, criticized the prospect of state-subsidized rail transit.

But now she wants to give Ellis and his ideas a chance. “We won’t know until we try,” she said.

Sharp-Trap Containers on Select Amtrak Trains

May 12, 2015

Amtrak is now offering complimentary Sharp-Trap® containers aboard select long-distance trains for passengers to safely dispose of small sharp items including, insulin syringes and needles, lancets and razor blades.

The containers are designed to reduce and/or eliminate passengers’ and employees’ risk of cuts or other injuries caused by sharp personal items. Trains offering the containers include the following:

  • Capitol Limited, Trains 29 and 30
  • Cardinal, Trains 50 and 51
  • City of New Orleans, Trains 58 and 59
  • Crescent, Trains 19 and 20
  • Lake Shore Limited, Trains 48/448 and 49/449
  • Silver Meteor, Trains 97 and 98
  • Silver Star, Trains 91 and 92

The Sharp-Trap containers are available upon request from any Amtrak employee on board the train. Employees can also demonstrate how to use the container, if necessary. Sharp-Trap containers are not available at stations.

Amtrak employees cannot dispose of Sharp-Trap containers and for safety reasons passengers must keep their used containers in their possession until exiting the train.

Passengers who see a Sharp-Trap container in any area of the train or station should notify an Amtrak employee.

Amtrak said the availability of Sharp-Trap containers is expected to be added to additional trains.


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 76 other followers