Posts Tagged ‘Berea tower’

Trio From Berea

August 18, 2021

Here are three trains passing through Berea on April 16, 2005. Although that was a Saturday, it was not an Akron Railroad Club Dave McKay Day, which was traditionally held on the first Saturday in April. In fact the first McKay Day was held two weeks before these images were made and it was snowing heavily that day. Note that in 2005 former Conrail locomotives in their original livery were still roaming Norfolk Southern.

Photographs by Robert Farkas

One Day at Berea in June 1971

April 25, 2021

The wayback machine has transported us back to June 1971 in Berea. An eastbound Penn Central mail train is passing BE Tower.

There is much to see here that is of historical significance and much you can’t see anymore. Let’s start with E7A No. 4034. Built for the New York Central in March 1939, it wasn’t all that long ago that it was pulling passenger trains. Now it is in mail train service, which wasn’t a bad place to be given how mail trains operated.

Look closer at the 4034. It may have a PC herald on its nose but its NYC “cigar band” stripe is still easily visible.

If you look back in the consist of the train you’ll find a rider coach and a string of Flexi-Vans, which were a NYC specialty.

You’ve probably also noticed the type G signal heads that lasted into the Norfolk Southern era on the Chicago Line.

Now look in the door of BE Tower. Yes, that is a child waving along with the operator. We don’t know the identity of the kid but it might be the photographer’s son.

Back then not only did towers have operators but some of them could also be quite friendly and accommodating.

Photograph by Richard Jacobs

Rounding the Bend in Berea

May 10, 2019

Amtrak Train No. 48 was late, two and a half hours late. That might not have been good news for the passengers, but it was great news for me.

It meant an uncommon opportunity to photograph Amtrak in daylight in Cleveland.

The Lake Shore Limited lost its time departing Chicago, where it didn’t get out of Union Station until 12:26 a.m., which is 2 hours and 56 minutes off schedule.

I don’t know why there was such a late departure, but there was.

By the time No. 48 got to Berea it had made up some of the last time, but not much. It would arrive in New York City at 9:21 p.m., 2 hours and 46 minutes down.

The train had its usual summer consist. The Boston section had a sleeper, cafe car and two coaches. The New York section had four coaches, Viewliner dining car Dover, two sleepers and a baggage car. Viewliner dining car Springfield was dead heading on the rear of the train.

Up front were the customary two P42DC locomotives.

Trying Something Different in Berea

February 27, 2018

I’ve been going to Berea to watch trains for more than 20 years. I’ve pretty much exhausted about every photo angle I can think of short of trespassing on railroad property.

About the only thing new to get in Berea is to catch a particular locomotive or rail car that I haven’t photographed there before. Or so I thought.

While in Berea not long ago on a rare sunny winter day, I had the idea of photographing trains splitting the signals that have been installed within the past couple of years.

In the top image, eastbound Norfolk Southern intermodal train 206 has a Canadian National unit leading. Although not visible, the trailing unit belongs to Union Pacific.

In the middle image, westbound NS manifest freight 309 is framed by the signals on the Toledo connection between NS and CSX. Behind the lead unit is the Wabash heritage unit.

The bottom images shows a westbound NS stack train framed by several signals, including the westbound home signals for CP 194 on the Chicago Line.

How Soon We Forget What Might Have Been

March 2, 2017

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It was about this time a year ago that E. Hunter Harrison and Canadian Pacific were making a play to acquire Norfolk Southern.

Harrison came at NS hard, but came up short. The NS board of directors opposed the merger and Harrison ran into a buzz saw of opposition from shippers, labor unions and political figures.

The time was not ripe to institute what some see coming as the final round of Class 1 mergers in North America.

Since failing to acquire NS, Harrison has retired (again) and the financier Bill Ackman of Pershing Square Capital has also left the CP board.

Now Harrison has teamed up with hedge fund Mantle Ridge to try to shakeup CSX management and install Harrison  as CEO.

While railfanning in Berea back in November I photographed a CP unit trailing on a westbound NS train as a reminder of what might have been had Harrison prevailed.

Article and Photograph by Craig Sanders

I Just Felt Like Shooting a CP Unit

October 14, 2016

 

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I don’t know why, but I just felt like photographing this Canadian Pacific locomotive at Berea.

It’s not leading and there is nothing special about this unit. But it was the first thing I saw when I arrived to spend a few hours on a Sunday morning.

It was a day of sun and clouds and sometimes you got the sun and sometimes you didn’t. Also shown is the eastbound Q158 and the eastbound Q090. In both instances I tried to emphasize the clouds and sky, which were nice on Sunday.

The Q090 is a train that I haven’t seen for awhile. It was also the first time I’d seen it since UP and CSX began teaming up to offer express produce service from Washington State.

Photographs by Craig Sanders

But It Sure Looks Pretty

October 10, 2016

There was no getting blocked by CSX this time as the Virginian heritage locomotive passes through Berea.

There was no getting blocked by CSX this time as the Virginian heritage locomotive passes through Berea as had happened three years ago.

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The engineer of Norfolk Southern train 15J wasn’t all that pleased with her lead locomotive.

She was exchanging greetings with a crew member on an eastbound train as they passed between CP Max and Berea.

The lead unit on the 15J wasn’t pulling as well as she would have liked and there had been a problem with the horn.

“But it sure looks pretty,” she said after listing the engine’s shortcomings.

Indeed it did for it was NS No. 1069, the Virginian heritage unit wearing its bright yellow and black livery that has prompted some wags to call it the bumble bee.

The 1069 and a trailing unit passed through Berea on late Sunday morning.

I had expected to see the Virginian working solo because the engineer had made reference to having a one unit wonder. Maybe the trailing unit was off line.

It was the second time that I’ve seen No. 1069 at Berea. The first sighting occurred on Oct. 5, 2013, and I had dashed over from the Great Berea Train Show to catch it despite rainy and cloudy conditions.

Yes, I saw the 1069, but it was obscured by a passing CSX intermodal train. And the 1069 was trailing.

I also got blocked this time, too. CSX train Q158 — also an intermodal train — was bearing down on Berea as the 15J approached.

But this time there was enough separation to get clear images of the 1069.

Interestingly, I’ve seen a handful of NS heritage units in Berea, but the 1069 is the first one I’ve bagged that was leading. All the others had been trailing. There was no failing this time.

Article and Photographs by Craig Sanders

Conrail H Unit Passes through N.E. Ohio

August 8, 2016

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The past several weeks the Conrail heritage unit of Norfolk Southern has been leading trains through Northeast Ohio.

Two weeks ago I caught it going by Berea tower (top photograph). This is a significant location both locally but also for the Conrail system.

Conrail’s route structure was basically an X with the lines crossing at Cleveland and, specifically, at Berea tower.

On Saturday, I caught the Conrail H unit leading again, this time at East Conway (middle and bottom photographs). Conway Yard was an important point on the former Pennsylvania Railroad ever since it opened in 1957. This continued through Penn Central and Conrail and remains so with Norfolk Southern.

Many photos have been taken throughout the years at this iconic spot and I thought this would be a worthy inclusion with those.

Article and Photographs by Todd Dillon

Different From All The Others

May 27, 2016

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I made this photograph because I liked the contrast of the direct early morning sunlight on BE Tower with the dark clouds behind it.

It is a Saturday morning on the Akron Railroad Club’s annual Dave McKay Day last April. I had walked down to the area east of the former Big Four depot, which is now a restaurant, to photograph an eastbound CSX train passing the station.

The sun was in and out of the clouds. As I was about to get back to my car, it popped out again and I just had to make this image.

I’ve seen and photographed BE Tower dozens of times over the years, but there was something about this image that made it different than all of the others.

Article and Photograph by Craig Sanders

Colorful Sunset in Berea

March 18, 2016

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By the time I got to Berea, the light of day had begun to rapidly diminish. I had just over two hours to kill before going to the meeting of the Railroad Enthusiasts and had brought my camera along.

You just never know what you might see that you’ll want to photograph.

The skies had been a mixture of blue and clouds, which would turn out to be an advantage as the last rays of light peaked over the horizon.

Getting the most colorful images during a sunset is a combination of art and science, but one key is to understand that those vivid colors are going to be very short-lived.

Nearly as soon as nature puts on a display of brilliant colors, they are taken away. You better move fast and you better have some luck if you hope to juxtapose a sunset with a moving train.

I caught a little of everything during my time in Berea with the help of a westbound CSX auto rack train.

Article and Photographs by Craig Sanders

The lead unit of a westbound CSX auto rack train.

The lead unit of a westbound CSX auto rack train.

A "fiery" auto rack. The effect is created by sunlight coming through crevices and openings.

A “fiery” auto rack. The effect is created by sunlight coming through crevices and openings.

Chasing the setting sun toward the Greenwich Subdivision of CSX.

Chasing the setting sun toward the Greenwich Subdivision of CSX.

Compare and contrast this image with the one below. The colors of a sunset can vary in the span of a few minutes.

Compare and contrast this image with the one below. The colors of a sunset can vary in the span of a few minutes.

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