Posts Tagged ‘BNSF locomotives’

CSX Two for Tuesday on a June Sunday

June 21, 2022

It’s early June in Clinton. On this Sunday we catch BNSF 6630 and a couple of fellow stablemates pulling a westbound on the CSX New Castle Subdivision. In the bottom image, CSX 371 leads a westbound in the sunlight of summer.

Photographs by Robert Farkas

BNSF Triple Play in Clinton

May 5, 2022

Here are three photographs of an eastbound CSX grain train in Clinton on April 23 that featured an all-BNSF motive power consist.

In the top image BNSF 8287 leads the train past the westbound signal home signals located at the far east end of Warwick Yard.

In the middle image is the lead unit directly in front of me. In the bottom image we see BNSF 5143, which is the distributed power unit for the train.

Photographs by Robert Farkas

Early NS in Berea Two for Tuesday

May 3, 2022

Norfolk Southern took over from Conrail the Chicago Line between Cleveland and Chicago on June 1, 1999. Shown above are two views of NS trains made during the first year of NS operation of the Chicago Line.

As seen in the top image, Conrail locomotives were still quite common during that era. Former CR C36-7 No. 8485 leads a westbound with a lease unit helping out. The photo was made on Nov. 6, 1999.

A few months later another westbound passes the former BE Tower with a pair of NS units and a former Burlington Northern locomotive. The latter may be a lease unit as its BN markings appear to have been painted over. The photo was made on Feb. 26, 2000.

Photographs by Craig Sanders

Just Another Day on the Wheeling in Brewster

April 15, 2022

It is the morning of March 17, 2012, in Wheeling & Lake Erie’s Brewster Yard. BNSF 9933 will be eastbound later in the day, but WE SD40-3 No. 3049 is switching the yard now.

Photograph by Robert Farkas

And He’s Off

April 14, 2022

It’s the morning of July 3, 2021, in Clinton and a pair of horses are grazing in a pasture adjacent to the CSX New Castle Subdivision tracks.

One of the steeds didn’t take well to the passage of a westbound train and has bolted as though coming out of the starting gate in a race (top image). In the middle is another view of the motive consist of the westbound.

In the bottom image is horsepower of a different color. A grain train has a BNSF pumpkin as its sole motive power of this eastbound train in Clinton.

Photographs by Robert Farkas

Pumpkin on NS Two for Tuesday

March 22, 2022

BNSF “pumpkins” leading trains on CSX or Norfolk Southern are not necessarily rare occurrences but they can still turn your head and lead you to press the shutter release button on your camera when you see one. I was in Goshen, Indiana, on the NS Chicago Line in early afternoon on Sunday when train 60E came east through CP 412 (top photograph) with a motive power consist of one BNSF unit on the point followed by two Union Pacific units trailing.

The train is handed over to NS in Chicago by Canadian National at Calumet Yard and then heads for Mingo Junction with a load of covered hoppers containing frac sand. It operates as needed. There is a another frac sand train that CN turns over to NS at Calumet Yard, the 60F, that interchanges in Radebaugh, Pennsylvania, to the Allegheny Valley Railroad.

In the bottom photograph, the 60E is passing Oak Ridge Cemetery, which is to the north of the tracks.

Catching a ‘Pumpkin’ in Warwick

February 23, 2022

BNSF SD40-2 No. 6799 is leading an eastbound CSX train on May 8, 2004. This was an early BNSF locomotive livery.

Photographs by Robert Farkas

Bright Orange for a Dreary Day

January 26, 2022

It was a typical dreary Northeast Ohio winter day in Berea. In looking back, I’m not sure why I bothered to create photographs at all given the conditions. But I did.

On a day such as this, the appearance of an eastbound CSX interrmodal train led by a pair of BNSF “pumpkins” was a welcome sight because it gave the day a splash of bright color.

I had forgotten that I made these images until I went looking for something else and found these photos, which were made on Feb. 1, 2014.

Made in Ohio, Not Out West

December 1, 2021

Although this may look as if it were taken out west, this is an eastbound Wheeling & Lake Erie train headed for Rook Yard in Pennsylvania. On the point is SD40T-2 No. 5413. Note the very small “WE” above the number on the cab’s side. The train was photographed east of Harmon on Sept. 21, 2010.

Photograph by Robert Farkas

Curses, Foiled Again

October 7, 2021

I was sitting in Waterloo, Indiana, next to the Chicago Line of Norfolk Southern when I heard talk on the radio about a train 880.

The 880 is a loaded Powder River coal train handed over to NS in Chicago by BNSF at Cicero Yard and it usually has BNSF motive power.

It is destined for a Detroit Edison power plant in the Monroe/Trenton, Michigan, area.

Although it was late morning, the lighting remained favorable for an eastbound. I planned to get the lead unit of the 880 passing a former freight station.

As soon as I heard the defect detector go off near milepost 370 I started getting into position because the train was less than three miles away.

I was standing in a city parking lot next to the former New York Central passenger station, which also serves as an Amtrak waiting room although the boarding platform is a block west.

The tracks here are slightly elevated from the level of the parking lot.

I heard a locomotive horn and figured that to be the 880 blowing for a crossing on the west side of town.

Just as the orange nose of the lead BNSF unit came into sight on Track 2, out of nowhere came a westbound manifest freight on Track 1, which blocked the shot I planned to get of the 880. I was able to get a glimpse of the 800 but that was it.

To be honest, what I said was stronger than the favorite saying of cartoon character Oil Can Harry of Mighty Mouse fame whenever something didn’t go his way.

It turned out the horn I heard was that of the westbound for a crossing about a block to the east. I had heard another train making scratchy calls on the radio, but it didn’t seem that close. Alas, it was closer than I thought.

What else can I say? Things like this happen when you’re trackside.