Posts Tagged ‘B&O color position light signals’

Grinding Along at Pawnee

January 4, 2022

I am standing on the rickety wood bridge carrying River Corners Road over the CSX New Castle Subdivision west of Lodi.

A westbound CSX coke train rumbles along past the venerable Baltimore & Ohio color position light signals at a location the crews call Pawnee when calling the signal indication over the radio.

You will notice the mast for the signal on Track 2 has a letter plate “G” which denotes grade. If an eastbound gets a red signal here the crew may continue at restricted speed prepared to stop until the next signal. That is because the train is on a grade.

A number of things have changed at this location since this image was made on May 23, 2008.

The CPLs have been replaced by newer signals that can be seen standing shortly to the east. Interestingly, those “newer” signals have themselves since been replaced.

In 2008 the bridge on which I am standing was still a one-lane wood structure. It has been placed by a modern concrete two-lane bridge.

However, that bridge has a high chain link fence that makes getting photographs here a challenge.

The signal is likely named for Pawnee Road, which once crossed over the tracks on a wood bridge to the east of here. That bridge was removed in conjunction with the project that led to the replacement of the River Corners Road bridge.

The highway to the right is U.S. Route 224 and it is still the two-lane road it was when this image was made.

Article and Photograph by Craig Sanders

Some Orange in Warwick

August 10, 2021

BNSF C44-9W No. 5842 leads an is eastbound in Warwick (Clinton) out of the yard on May 8, 2004. The image was made with a 3 megapixel digital camera.

Photograph by Robert Farkas

Another CSX Train in Clinton

July 27, 2021

We’re stepping back a couple of decades to April 1996 to watch a westbound passing beneath the Ohio Route 21 bride in Clinton. The Baltimore & Ohio color position light signals are a dead giveaway that this is not a recent image.

Photograph by Robert Farkas

A Little Wild Mary, a Little B&O

May 28, 2021

Western Maryland SD40 No. 7595 is working solo at Warwick on July 14, 1982, to haul an intermodal train on what is today the CSX New Castle Subdivision. Originally, this was a Baltimore & Ohio mainline, hence the B&O style color position light. No. 7595 would later see duty on the CSX motive power roster and may have taken this signal years later in CSX dress.

Photograph by Robert Farkas

Action on North and South Ohio Rail Lines

May 28, 2021

Most rail lines in Ohio are oriented east-west and are dispatched as such. But even some rail lines that physically operate on a north-south orientation are dispatched as east and west rather than north and south.

This can be seen in Marion where former Chesapeake & Ohio and Pennsylvania Railroad routes come through town on a north-south orientation but are dispatched as east-west routes.

In western Ohio, a couple of rail lines are dispatched north and south. Shown above are some images made on the CSX Toledo Subdivision (former Baltimore & Ohio) and the Indiana & Ohio (former Detroit, Toledo & Ironton).

In the top image a southbound CSX auto rack train, the Q203, is approaching Hook-Watz Road north of Cairo, Ohio. It has just passed beneath a signal bridge visible in the distance that still holds a B&O color position light signal.

Next up is southbound steel train K596, which is moving from the north end of a lap siding at Cairo to the main.

Moving farther south, we find southbound manifest freight Q509 rolling along south of Wapakoneta. Note the B&O position signals in the distance. These are still several of them on the Toledo Sub.

Skipping even further south, we find the Q561 in Hamilton, Ohio, on the joint track used by CSX and Norfolk Southern.

Now let’s check out some I&O trains starting with a southbound that has just left the yard in Lima. It is crossing the former Pennsylvania Railroad’s Fort Wayne Line at Sugar Street.

We head back north to Ottawa where we find an I&O train getting off its own rails and onto the CSX Toledo Sub. The former DT&I is abandoned between here and Lima.

Not far down the road that same I&O train is passing the grain elevator complex in Columbus Grove. At one time, the Akron, Canton & Youngstown crossed the B&O here although the crossing was farther south from the grain elevator.

Finally, we end the series with an oldie. This southbound I&O train was captured on its own tracks south of Hamler on July 19, 2009, and was scanned from a slide.

You wouldn’t know this was the I&O from the motive power being used. In fact you might not think you were even in Ohio.

All the other images in this series were made this past April.

Article and Photographs by Craig Sanders

In the Middle of a Lap Siding

May 10, 2021

CSX has removed some of the lap siding on the Toledo Subdivision that the Baltimore & Ohio installed years ago, but it kept the one in Cairo, Ohio. Shown is steel train K596 coming out of the northern end of the siding and onto the main.

If you look carefully, you will see that the dwarf signal is giving a train in the southern end of the siding a clear signal to come out onto the main.

Out of view is CSX manifest freight that is meeting the K596 here.

Note that lead unit SD40-2 No. 4008 has one of the square cabs CSX gave some of these units when they were rebuilt. This locomotive was originally built for the Seaboard Coast Line.

Somewhere on the B&O

January 21, 2021

We’re not sure who made this photograph or even where it was made other than somewhere on the Baltimore & Ohio.

The image is in the collection of Robert Farkas who believes it might have been made by the late Richard Sherwood.

Shown is a crop of the original Agfachrome slide that was processed in June 1971.

The lead unit, F7A No. 4633, was built in January 1953 with roster number 979A.

Running East in Warwick

July 7, 2020

Numerous railfans have capture this view of an eastbound on the CSX New Castle Subdivision curving out of the yard in Warwick and going through downtown, such as it is.

The photo spot is still there but the Baltimore & Ohio color position signal has been replaced.

Shown is CSX SD50-2 No. 8573 on June 25, 2012, leading an auto rack train.

Photograph by Robert Farkas

2 Things No Longer Used by CSX

June 30, 2020

There are two things in this image that are no longer in use by CSX but let’s not get ahead of the story just yet.

This image of a container train eastbound in Warwick was made on Oct. 13, 1996.

Lead unit CSXT No. 5891 is a GE B36-7 that was built in July 1985 for Seaboard System.

It has since been retired from the CSX roster although locomotive leasing firm NRE has it available. Just check out their website.

As for the other item no longer used by CSX, that would be the color position light signal.

Photograph by Robert Farkas

Its Nearly All Gone Now

April 28, 2020

Most of what you see in this image of an eastbound Penn Central train ambling through downtown Akron in 1968 is gone.

The Pennsylvania Railroad had just vanished into Penn Central which itself is now 44 years gone for having given way to Conrail.

Conrail ceased operations in Akron long before it was divided by Norfolk Southern and CSX.

The Erie Lackawanna passenger station, which was still in use when this image was made, is gone and a bank now sits on that site.

In the background you can see the former Erie Railroad freight house, which lasted the longest of most things in this scene.

The freight house was razed a few years ago to make way for new apartments catering to University of Akron students.

The three railroads that used these tracks in 1968 are all gone as well, including the Baltimore & Ohio.

Also gone is the B&O style color position signal just to the right of the nose of the Pennsy Alco diesel.

A portion of the boarding platform for Akron Union Depot is visible and it was removed in early 2012. If anything, it is remarkable that it lasted as long as it did given that this section of the platform never served passengers again after May 1, 1971.

There are fewer tracks at this location now. The two that exist are part of the CSX New Castle Subdivision and also used by the Akron Barberton Cluster Railway.

You can still stand in this general location and photograph trains even though the nature of this scene has changed quite a bit in the past 52 years.

Photograph by Robert Farkas