Posts Tagged ‘Clarence Gooden’

Ex-CSX President Looks Back on His Time There

October 2, 2018

Long before E. Hunter Harrison became CEO at CSX, the railroad’s management team was already studying the precision scheduled railroading model and had adopted some of its principles.

That was the message that Clarence Gooden, the CSX Transportation president who retired after Harrison became CSX CEO, told the North East Association of Rail Shippers last week.

Gooden said CSX adopted such practices as laying off employees, mothballing locomotives, closing some small yards, and shuttering 11 of its smaller car and locomotive repair shops.

CSX under former CEO Michael Ward also began running longer trains in an effort to reduce train starts and improve crew and locomotive utilization, and increased its use of distributed power.

Although CSX closed a couple of the 14 humps it operated at the time , Gooden said the carrier should have closed four or five more humps.

The moves during the Ward administration were in response to the Great Recession of 2008 and a sharp drop in coal traffic.

Coal provided a 53 percent profit margin and when it declined, it was a major blow to the CSX balance sheet.

Losing coal traffic cost CSX $1.5 in revenue as the domestic utility coal market collapsed over a five-year period.

Gooden expects CSX to take another hit in lost coal revenue starting in 2023 when a wave of retirements of coal-fired power plants is expected to begin.

He predicted that CSX and NS alike will spin off or close many of their coal-dependent routes.

Although intermodal traffic might pick up some of the slack left by falling coal traffic, Gooden said intermodal traffic is not nearly as profitable as coal.

The Eastern railroads might have to live with higher operating ratios due to declining coal traffic and an increase in intermodal business.

Gooden spoke favorably of the changes that Harrison introduced during his less than a year at the helm of CSX before his death.

But he also defended the accomplishments of the railroad during the Ward years.

From 2004 to 2017, CSX’s stock price went from $5.13 to $36.88.

Other achievements that Gooden cited included making the hiring of veterans a priority, launching an ad campaign promoting the efficiency of rail transportation, having the distinction of being the safest Class I railroad.

At the same time Gooden said CSX should have adopted technology much faster. He said automating yard operations and taking advantage of the operational benefits of positive train control will be a focal point for reducing costs.

Gooden also believes that CSX should have developed closer ties with short line and regional railroads because of their importance in feeding traffic.

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Harrison is the New CSX President, Too

April 24, 2017

E. Hunter Harrison has added another title to his resume at CSX. He is now the president of the company as well as its chief executive officer.

Harrison replaced Fredrik Eliasson, who was named CSX president on Feb. 21 after serving as the railroads’s chief marketing officer.

Eliasson will now become executive vice president and chief sales and marketing officer for CSX.

The moves in the executive suite mean that CSX has had three presidents in less than four months.

The year began with Clarence Gooden as president. The original plan was for Gooden to step down at the end of May when then-CEO Michael Ward also would retire.

Harrison assumed the CEO post on March 6. The good news for Eliasson is that he will get to keep the pay increase that he received when he was named president.

“There were no compensation adjustments associated with these title changes,” CSX said in a regulatory filing.

Harrison’s Compensation at CSX Outlined

March 9, 2017

Hunter Harrison and CSX agreed to a base salary of $2.2 million, the railroad said this week in a regulatory filing.

The compensation package also includes an annual target bonus opportunity of up to $2.8 million, with that amount as a guaranteed bonus this year.

Harrison will receive options on 9 million shares of CSX stock, which is valued at $448 million at its current price of $49.79 per share.

Half of those options will hinge on his continued employment and the other half are tied to his meeting a series of performance targets.

The agreement to hire Harrison as its CEO also came with a number of changes in the CSX board of directors.

Clarence Gooden is no longer vice chairman and board member Timothy O’Toole has resigned immediately.

CSX’ has amended its corporate bylaws to separate the roles of CEO and chairman of the board as well as to change the mandatory retirement age of 75. Harrison is 72.

Although it remains to be seen how Harrison’s management philosophy will play out at CSX, analysts expect that he will further thin the number of managers and employees at the company, close yards and shops, and sell off some rail routes.

These measures will be aimed at improving operations, reducing expenses and boosting profitability.

Some have noted that CSX is far different than were Canadian National and Canadian Pacific when he took over as CEO at those railroads.

The Canadian roads were linear systems whereas CSX has a more complex route network.

That will challenge Harrison to impose his precision scheduled railroading philosophy, which he developed as CEO of the Illinois Central Railroad in the 1990s.

One decision Harrison will need to make will be whether to continue the CSX of Tomorrow strategy, which emphasized intermodal and merchandise traffic while focusing on its major routes operating in a triangle operating from Chicago to New Jersey to Florida and then back to Chicago.

CSX CEO Ward to Retire on May 31

February 21, 2017

On Tuesday CSX Corp. announced that Chairman and Chief Executive Michael Ward and President Clarence Gooden will retire, effective May 31.

Fredrik Eliasson, a 22-year veteran of the company and current Chief Sales and Marketing

Michael Ward

Michael Ward

Officer, has been appointed as President effective Feb. 15.

The Jacksonville, Fla.-based railroad in a statement described the changes as an “orderly transition” of senior leadership, adding it is continuing discussions with Hunter Harrison and activist investor Mantle Ridge regarding Harrison becoming CEO at CSX.

CSX said that the elevation of Eliasson to the president’s post was not intended to affect the discussions with Harrison of Mantle Ridge, which owns less than 5 percent of CSX stock.

“On behalf of CSX’s Board of Directors, I want to thank Michael and Clarence for their many years of dedicated service and contributions to our company,” said Edward J. Kelly III, Presiding Director. “Michael has helped build CSX into one of the nation’s leading transportation and logistics companies, and Clarence has similarly provided valuable leadership across CSX’s sales, marketing and operations teams. We wish both the best in their retirements.”

Eliasson, 46, will maintain his current responsibilities in his new position. He has served as executive vice president and Chief Sales and Marketing Officer since September 2015, and prior to that was Chief Financial Officer from 2012-15. He joined CSX in 1995.

In an other development, Ward said today that 1,000 CSX management positions would be eliminated in a cost cutting move.

The job cuts will affect positions at CSX headquarters in Jacksonville, Florida, as well as various field offices.