Posts Tagged ‘C&O No. 2700’

Dennison Museum to Unveil Restored Locomotive

October 21, 2017

The Dennison Railroad Depot Museum will conduct an “unveiling party” on Nov. 3 of its recently restored Chespeake & Ohio steam locomotive No. 2700.

The event will begin at 1o a.m. at the museum, which is housed in a former Pennsylvania Railroad passenger station on the Pittsburgh-St. Louis mainline.

The cosmetic restoration used more than 320 parts that were recreated by Jason Johnson of Gemini Industrial to complete the restoration.

Prior to restoration, No. 2700 had one of the most vandalized steam locomotives in the county and been stripped of many of its parts.

The engine sits on the east end of the Dennison Depot, which has been designated a National Historic Landmark as the best example left in the country of a World War II Servicemen’s Canteen Site.

Those who join the 2700 Club Membership Program for $27 will help ensure the upkeep of the engine. Members will receive a print of the engine.

Restoration to Begin on C&O 2700

September 12, 2017

Cosmetic restoration work is set to get underway on former Chesapeake & Ohio 2-8-4 Kanawha-type No. 2700, which is currently housed at the east end of the Dennison Railroad Depot Museum.

It has been in Dennison since August 1997 and the restoration work will be done on site.

Museum Director Wendy Zucal said the work will cost an estimated $150,000 and be completed late this fall.

Funding is coming from the Ohio Department of Transportation local Enhancement project with matching contributions from Dennison, the Reeves Foundation, the Harold C. and Marjorie Q. Rosenberry Foundation, the Leggitt Foundation, the Doris and Floyd Kimble Foundation, the Tom E. Dailey Foundation, the Brach Foundation, the Tuscarawas County Community Foundation and Wendy’s.

The work will be done by Gemini Industrial Machines of Dover, which is owned by Jason Johnson.

The museum said in a new release the work will include sandblasting and painting the locomotive to its original livery. Several missing parts will be recreated.

Zucal said the locomotive has been stripped of its gauges, valves, name plates, driving rods, windows, bell and whistle.

“There were many obstacles in the road challenging the completion of this project,” Zucal said. “The Depot restoration had to be completed first, funding had to be raised twice and ownership had to be proven twice. Although it has taken far longer than ever anticipated, the community and museum have shown tremendous tenacity to keep the engine restoration on track.”

No. 2700 was one of 90 locomotives in its class built in the World War II era with 20 built by Lima Locomotive Works and 70 constructed by American Locomotive Company.

No. 2700 was built by Alco in 1943 in Schenectady, New York.

Dennison Museum Seeking Funds for Cosmetic Restoration of C&O Steam Locomotive No. 2700

April 21, 2015

A fundraising drive has been established with the goal of raising $20,000 to pay for a cosmetic restoration of Chesapeake & Ohio 2-8-4 Kanawha Class No. 2700 at the Dennison Railroad Depot Museum.

The restoration project is part of a Transportation Enhancement Local Project sponsored by the Ohio Department of Transportation.

ODOT is administering 80 percent of the funding provided by the federal government. The museum must match the remaining 20 percent of the project.

After the funds have been secured, the restoration work will go out for bid. Museum officials hope to have the work completed by 2016.

Built in 1943, the 2700 is in poor condition and has been stripped of most of its components.

“It is important to have a steam engine of this size on site in order for visitors – especially children, to understand the industrial power the railroad symbolized that not only built our nation, but helped win the war,” said museum Director Wendy Zucal. “This particular engine, built in the early 1940s, was a typical engine used during World War II. It was the first in a series of Kanawha-Class engines built for the C&O and is one of the few left today.”

For more information on the “Save Steam Engine No. 2700” campaign, go to fundly.com.

C&O Steam Locomotive To Stay in Dennison

September 24, 2009

A Tuscarawas County judge has ruled that a former Chesapeake & Ohio steam locomotive will remain where it is in Dennison. Judge Edward O’Farrell determined that the Dennison Railroad Depot Museum has clear title to No. 2700, a Kanawha type locomotive that was built in the 1940s.

The ruling came in a dispute with Nick Kallas, executive director of the Illinois Railway Museum, who purchased No. 2700, but never took possession of it. At the time, the locomotive was located on Timken Company property in Canton. Timken took possession of the locomotive after the Wheeling & Lake Erie Railway announced plans to reconfigure its tracks in that area. Timken based its action on the locomotive being abandoned property.

Timken offered the locomotive to the Dennison museum with the stipulation that if the museum refused the offer the locomotive would be scrapped. The museum and Timken sent certified letters to Kallas informing him of their intentions, but he never responded. The C&O steamer has been in Dennison for the past 10 years.

The Dennison museum, which is housed in a former Pennsylvania Railroad passenger depot, has received a grant to fund restoration work on No. 2700, which will remain at the museum on static display. That work is expected to begin next year.

In an interview with the Times-Reporter of New Philadelphia, museum executive director Wendy Zucal said the museum is glad that the locomotive will remain there. “We plan to put it in a place of honor as a showcase at the east end of Dennison,” she said.