Posts Tagged ‘C&O steam locomotives’

Indiana Rail Museum Reunites C&O Steamer With its Builders Plate

April 9, 2021

An Indiana railroad museum has acquired the builder’s plate for a former Chesapeake & Ohio steam locomotive decades after the two were separated in the 1950s

The Hoosier Valley Railroad Museum found the plate for C&O 2-8-4 No. 2789, which the museum based in North Judson is seeking to have placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The locomotive was built by Alco in Schenectady, New York, in 1947.

In a news release, the museum credited its secretary, Kyle Flanigan , with doing much of the work to find the builders plate.

 “Once these kinds of things are gone from a locomotive, they are usually gone forever,” Flanigan said. “To have an opportunity like this, we simply could not let it slip away.”

No. 2789 is the last of 90 C&O Kanawha-type locomotives and the only surviving example of the five constructed with a welded boiler.

Dennison Museum to Unveil Restored Locomotive

October 21, 2017

The Dennison Railroad Depot Museum will conduct an “unveiling party” on Nov. 3 of its recently restored Chespeake & Ohio steam locomotive No. 2700.

The event will begin at 1o a.m. at the museum, which is housed in a former Pennsylvania Railroad passenger station on the Pittsburgh-St. Louis mainline.

The cosmetic restoration used more than 320 parts that were recreated by Jason Johnson of Gemini Industrial to complete the restoration.

Prior to restoration, No. 2700 had one of the most vandalized steam locomotives in the county and been stripped of many of its parts.

The engine sits on the east end of the Dennison Depot, which has been designated a National Historic Landmark as the best example left in the country of a World War II Servicemen’s Canteen Site.

Those who join the 2700 Club Membership Program for $27 will help ensure the upkeep of the engine. Members will receive a print of the engine.

Restoration to Begin on C&O 2700

September 12, 2017

Cosmetic restoration work is set to get underway on former Chesapeake & Ohio 2-8-4 Kanawha-type No. 2700, which is currently housed at the east end of the Dennison Railroad Depot Museum.

It has been in Dennison since August 1997 and the restoration work will be done on site.

Museum Director Wendy Zucal said the work will cost an estimated $150,000 and be completed late this fall.

Funding is coming from the Ohio Department of Transportation local Enhancement project with matching contributions from Dennison, the Reeves Foundation, the Harold C. and Marjorie Q. Rosenberry Foundation, the Leggitt Foundation, the Doris and Floyd Kimble Foundation, the Tom E. Dailey Foundation, the Brach Foundation, the Tuscarawas County Community Foundation and Wendy’s.

The work will be done by Gemini Industrial Machines of Dover, which is owned by Jason Johnson.

The museum said in a new release the work will include sandblasting and painting the locomotive to its original livery. Several missing parts will be recreated.

Zucal said the locomotive has been stripped of its gauges, valves, name plates, driving rods, windows, bell and whistle.

“There were many obstacles in the road challenging the completion of this project,” Zucal said. “The Depot restoration had to be completed first, funding had to be raised twice and ownership had to be proven twice. Although it has taken far longer than ever anticipated, the community and museum have shown tremendous tenacity to keep the engine restoration on track.”

No. 2700 was one of 90 locomotives in its class built in the World War II era with 20 built by Lima Locomotive Works and 70 constructed by American Locomotive Company.

No. 2700 was built by Alco in 1943 in Schenectady, New York.

Railroading as it Once Was: When Chessie Ran Steam Trains to Promote Railroad Safety

December 15, 2016

chessie-steam-train

Chesapeake & Ohio No. 614 departs Connellsville, Pennsylvania, in September 1980 with a Chessie Safety Express. Even with a bright yellow train this was still a show. Note the original station behind the 11th car.

Photograph by Roger Durfee

Dennison Museum Seeking Funds for Cosmetic Restoration of C&O Steam Locomotive No. 2700

April 21, 2015

A fundraising drive has been established with the goal of raising $20,000 to pay for a cosmetic restoration of Chesapeake & Ohio 2-8-4 Kanawha Class No. 2700 at the Dennison Railroad Depot Museum.

The restoration project is part of a Transportation Enhancement Local Project sponsored by the Ohio Department of Transportation.

ODOT is administering 80 percent of the funding provided by the federal government. The museum must match the remaining 20 percent of the project.

After the funds have been secured, the restoration work will go out for bid. Museum officials hope to have the work completed by 2016.

Built in 1943, the 2700 is in poor condition and has been stripped of most of its components.

“It is important to have a steam engine of this size on site in order for visitors – especially children, to understand the industrial power the railroad symbolized that not only built our nation, but helped win the war,” said museum Director Wendy Zucal. “This particular engine, built in the early 1940s, was a typical engine used during World War II. It was the first in a series of Kanawha-Class engines built for the C&O and is one of the few left today.”

For more information on the “Save Steam Engine No. 2700” campaign, go to fundly.com.

C&O 1309 Readied for Move to Cumberland, Md.

July 11, 2014

A former Chesapeake & Ohio steam locomotive was loaded onto a flatcar on Thursday in preparation for its move to Cumberland, Md., to join the Western Maryland Scenic Railroad.

The 2-6-6-2 No. 1309 will be moved next week from the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Museum via a special move on CSX.

Railroad and museum officials prepared the locomotive for the move by removing smaller parts for truck transport.
The Hulcher company used four “sidewinder” machines that are commonly used in railcar repair and maintenance to help load the 1309 onto the heavy-duty flatcars.

The first segment of the loading involved the separation of No. 1309’s front articulated section from its main boiler and cab area.

The workers then disconnected the front drivers from the boiler, using the museum’s B&O-painted GP7. The articulated front end was positioned on an adjacent track, while workers loaded the locomotive’s main boiler and cab area.
A flat car was positioned beneath No. 1309’s boiler, which was suspended by the sidewinders about 7 feet in mid-air. Once spotted, workers lowered the locomotive onto the flat car, resting it on temporary steel bar stock that was installed for transport.

Museum officials estimate that workers will need another two days to secure equipment and make inspections before the 1309 can depart for Cumberland.

CSX donated a general-purpose flat car for the move and has agreed to move the locomotive to Cumberland at no charge. TTX donated a depressed center flat for the move at no cost.