Posts Tagged ‘CP motive power’

Beaver in Berea

September 6, 2017

Back in February Canadian Pacific announced that it was bringing back its beaver herald although it wasn’t until July that the modified logo began appearing on  locomotives.

CP used the beaver herald, which features a beaver, a maple leaf, a shield, the company name and the date of the railroad’s incorporation, previously, but dropped it for a more contemporary look.

The beaver has a long tradition at CP, having first been used on a company herald in 1886.

Here in the states we might think of the maple leaf as symbolic of Canada, but the beaver is our northern neighbor’s official symbol of sovereignty.

Between 1886 and 1929, the beaver appeared on four renditions of the CP herald, which featured a shield as its dominant element. In three of those iterations, the beaver appeared atop the shield.

The beaver went on hiatus between 1929 and 1946 when the CP herald was, again, shaped like a shield but featured the slogan “World’s Greatest Travel System.”

In 1946, CP brought the beaver back and it sat atop the shield through three generations of heralds. In 1968, CP decided to give itself a more “progressive look” and adopted a triangle C logo.

Other heralds would follow including one that featured the Canadian and U.S. flags. That was an effort to show that CP was a North American railroad and not just a Canadian one.

To celebrate its independent status, which included resuming use of the name Canadian Pacific Railways, CP resurrected the beaver and shield in 1997 in a bid to give itself a retro look.

Some corporations can only sit still with their image for a few years, so the beaver was put out to marsh in 2007.

CP adopted a minimalist approach with only its name “Canadian Pacific” appearing in its herald. Things got even more concise in 2012 when the herald became simply the letters CP.

Now the beaver, the maple leaf and the shield are back. Unlike the most recent beaver herald, the current logo does not feature solid gold shading in the shield. Instead, the shield has horizontal stripes.

The latest version of the beaver herald is expected to become widespread as CP ramps up a program to repaint its locomotive fleet. The herald will also adorn rebuilt locomotives.

AC400CW No. 9817 wore the previous beaver herald. It is shown leading CSX train Q166 through Berea this past Sunday sporting the new herald.

The Q166 and its counterpart, Q165, are CP run-through trains that use CSX between Chicago and Buffalo, New York.

Just over two hours after the Q166 passed by, the Q165 came rolling through Berea. It is always a good outing when you catch both CP run-through trains on the same day.

And the cherry on the top of this treat was the eastbound “salad shooter” with its usual Union Pacific motive power, shown in the bottom photo.

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Seeing Red

August 10, 2017

Train Q165 roars past the Lake Shore Railway Museum in North East, Pennsylvania.

On a couple of back-to-back outings I had the good luck of seeing Canadian Pacific motive power on four trains.

Two of them were Q165 and Q166, which are Chicago-Buffalo, New York, run through trains on CSX that have been operating for a few years now.

I used to somewhat regularly see one of those trains at Berea, but that hasn’t been the case for a while.

I’ve only seen both of them in the same day twice and each time I was in North East, Pennsylvania.

I also found CP motive power leading a pair of Norfolk Southern trains, the 216 and the 67X. One of those was moving and the other was tied down.

I didn’t mind seeing so much red and wouldn’t mind seeing it again now that CP has resumed putting its beaver tail logo on the flanks of some locomotives.

The light was less than ideal to get Q166, which was one of five consecutive eastbounds allowed to move as CSX was single-tracking the Erie West Subdivision between North East, Pennsylvania, and a point in New York York State.

A pair of CPs lead NS 216 through the vineyard country near Bort Road in North East, Pennsylvania.

The first of two views of NS train 67X tied down near Lewis Road in Olmsted Falls, Ohio.

 

Pair of Canadians in Berea

March 3, 2017

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Motive power from Canadian National and Canadian Pacific is not rare in Berea, but it is not a given, either.

CP has a pair of run-through trains that use CSX between Chicago and Buffalo, New York, and it is not unusual to see them in Berea during daylight hours.

Given how the North American Class I railroads share motive power, seeing a CN unit is not an unusual thing on either CSX or Norfolk Southern.

But what was a out of the ordinary during a recent railfanning outing in Berea was seeing two westbound NS trains with Canadian motive power on the lead as shown above.

Photographs by Craig Sanders

I Just Felt Like Shooting a CP Unit

October 14, 2016

 

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I don’t know why, but I just felt like photographing this Canadian Pacific locomotive at Berea.

It’s not leading and there is nothing special about this unit. But it was the first thing I saw when I arrived to spend a few hours on a Sunday morning.

It was a day of sun and clouds and sometimes you got the sun and sometimes you didn’t. Also shown is the eastbound Q158 and the eastbound Q090. In both instances I tried to emphasize the clouds and sky, which were nice on Sunday.

The Q090 is a train that I haven’t seen for awhile. It was also the first time I’d seen it since UP and CSX began teaming up to offer express produce service from Washington State.

Photographs by Craig Sanders

The Reds and Golds of Spring in Ohio

April 21, 2015
NS 8104 sits at Klines (Bellevue) next to a multi-level train.

NS 8104 sits at Klines (Bellevue) next to a multi-level train.

I headed to Bellevue last Saturday to possibly catch Norfolk Southern No. 8104, the Lehigh Valley heritage unit. It had been a middle unit and normally that is not something that I would travel very far to see.

But there was a slight chance it might be made the leader so off I went. Luck was with me as I arrived just after it had been turned and made the leader of a grain train, the 42G.

Traffic through Bellevue was heavy and caused a delay in the 42G’s departure. But some other good photos of other trains were to be had before the 42G finally got the railroad.

I chased it to Attica Junction (Siam) where I let it go and made some photos on CSX before heading home. All in all, there were some nice springtime photos with locomotives and trees sporting red and gold colors.

Article and Photographs by Roger Durfee

Departing Bellevue.

Departing Bellevue.

Coming through the signals at Shriver.

Coming through the signals at Shriver.

Just above Attica Junction.

Just above Attica Junction.

A colorful NS train No. 234 passing some "red buds" in Bellevue.

A colorful NS train No. 234 passing some “red buds” in Bellevue.

Roadrailer at Bellevue.

Roadrailer at Bellevue.

CSX Q166 at Attica Junction.

CSX Q166 at Attica Junction.

Q166 passing a flowering tree near Willard.

Q166 passing a flowering tree near Willard.

Two detail views of the CPR 9815. I had wondered what those "marks" around the perimeter of the unit were for. Turns out this unit was the Christmas Train unit a few years back.

Two detail views of the CPR 9815. I had wondered what those “marks” around the perimeter of the unit were for. Turns out this unit was the Christmas Train unit a few years back.

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Tank Cars Everywhere

December 10, 2014

Berea tankers

It was bound to happen. With the proliferation of trains carrying crude oil it is no surprise that while railfanning in Berea you might be able to see tank car trains passing simultaneously on Norfolk Southern and CSX.

However, in the interest of accuracy, the train on CSX being lead by a Canadian Pacific locomotive is carrying ethanol. The tanker train on NS, though, is carrying crude oil.

Photograph by Craig Sanders

Some Color on a Sunday Outing in Pennsylvania

April 13, 2014
A BNSF unit leads an eastbound auto rack train at midmorning in North East, Pa.

A BNSF unit leads an eastbound auto rack train at midmorning in North East, Pa.

My friend Adam and I ventured to North East, Pa., last Sunday in search of some color. No NS heritage units were anywhere near, so we took our chances with seeing something colorful on CSX and, maybe, Norfolk Southern.

The Bort Road bridge over the CSX tracks is still closed to vehicular traffic. That was good news because we could park on the road just before the concrete barriers and then walk out on the bridge when trains were nearby.

Traffic on CSX seemed a little slower than we expected, but there was still enough to make things interesting. NS traffic was what you would expect for a line that is not heavily used, but can still be counted on to provide some action if you are patient.

Article and Photographs by Craig Sanders

The Q166 was a surprise visitor. It was the second of back-to-back Canadian Pacific run-through intermodal trains.

The Q166 was a surprise visitor. It was the second of back-to-back Canadian Pacific run-through intermodal trains.

We expected to see the Q165, the first of the two CP intermodal trains. We just didn't know when it would come through the area. It arrived a little earlier than I thought it would.

We expected to see the Q165, the first of the two CP intermodal trains. We just didn’t know when it would come through the area. It arrived a little earlier than I thought it would.

Lake Erie was still mostly ice-covered on Sunday, April 6. The view is from the crest of Pennsylvania Route 89 south of North East.

Lake Erie was still mostly ice-covered on Sunday, April 6. The view is from the crest of Pennsylvania Route 89 south of North East.

BNSF and UP combine to lead a westbound tanker train. The lead unit is a former BN "Grinstein" unit that still looks resplendent.

BNSF and UP combine to lead a westbound tanker train. The lead unit is a former BN “Grinstein” unit that still looks resplendent.

Even CSX looked brilliant on this sun-splashed afternoon. Shown is a short westbound intermodal train.

Even CSX looked brilliant on this sun-splashed afternoon. Shown is a short westbound intermodal train.

About Those CP Container Trains on CSX

February 9, 2014

Although Canadian Pacific motive power has not been rare in Northeast Ohio, it has not been an everyday occurrence either.

But that changed late last year when CP began routing its intermodal trains 142 and 143 over CSX between Chicago and Buffalo.

The trains had operated over Norfolk Southern between Chicago and Detroit, using the Chicago Line to Butler, Ind., and then turning north onto the former Wabash.

CP shifted Nos. 142/143 to CSX so that it could operate additional crude oil trains over the NS route.  Another factor was a desire to operate high cube containers, which were not allowed through the Detroit River tunnel that CP uses.

On CSX, the CP trains operate as Q165 and Q166. The Q166 is planned to depart Chicago at approximately 7 a.m. while the Q165 is planned out of Buffalo at about 10 a.m.

The times that these trains actually reach Northeast Ohio will vary depending on a number of factors, including weather and traffic.

The Hunt for Red in January

January 14, 2014

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I went to Berea on Sunday hoping to fulfill two objectives. I wanted to photograph the CP intermodal trains that began operating late last year on CSX between Buffalo, N.Y., and Chicago, and I wanted to get a sunset shot.

It was mission accomplished for the first objective at 4:44 p.m. as the CP train passes the former Big Four depot.

I achieved my second objective not long after the passage of the CP train. On the way home, I pulled off I-480 onto Tiedeman Road en route to Steak ‘n Shake to get something to take home. I noticed the sky had gotten nice and red so I parked behind the Cracker Barrel restaurant and got the grab shot you see below. Amid the urban clutter are some freight cars parked on a siding on the CSX mainline.

Article and Photographs by Craig Sanders

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