Posts Tagged ‘CSX Cleveland Subdivision’

Memorial Day Weekend With CSX–Part 2

May 28, 2013
The sudden appearance of a westbound Wheeling & Lake Erie stone train would help me make up my mind about how to spend the rest of the afternoon. It shown approaching the crossing with Greenwich Town Line Road 79 S.

The sudden appearance of a westbound Wheeling & Lake Erie stone train would help me make up my mind about how to spend the rest of the afternoon. It shown approaching the crossing with Greenwich Town Line Road 79 S.

In early afternoon, a Wheeling & Lake Erie train had called the CSX IG dispatcher for permission to get onto the Cleveland Subdivision at CP 47 in New London.

At the time, the dispatcher said he would be waiting for two eastbounds. When those had passed and still no signal, the W&LE crew called its own dispatcher, who said he had talked to the IG dispatcher about 10 minutes previous and been told that the Wheeling train would have to wait for one more.

The W&LE crew, though, didn’t believe it, telling their own dispatcher, “They always say there is one more.”

They had good reason to be skeptical. Not only had they experienced this drill before, but one more would turn out to be three more.

The rumbling of diesels that I heard shortly after 3 p.m. would be the Wheeling train headed for the Carey Subdivision.

I scrambled to the road crossing for photographs. My original plan had been to shoot this train broadside from the top of the reservoir, but there wasn’t time to get up there now.

Although I had been monitoring the radio, I had not heard the W&LE train call any signals.

By now, though, the lighting favored the grade crossing shot.

The lead unit had been repainted recently – or maybe washed – and its nose gleamed in the afternoon sunlight.

A high, thin layer of clouds had moved in, so the sunlight was a bit filtered.

I drove over to Greenwich where I planned to photograph the train west of town on the former AC&Y.

I managed to get ahead of the train, thanks to it having to slow through the crossovers to get back onto its own tracks. I elected to meet it at Edwards Road.

After that, I went back into town where not one, but two Greenwich cops were monitoring traffic for speeding on the main drag.

I parked at the unofficial railfan park. A couple had set up a motor home there, something I had seen before.

There were three other railfans on hand, one of whom had an older model Pentax film camera. Another couple had between them three cameras, one of which used film.

I had just missed a tank car train led by a BNSF unit with two CSX locomotives trailing.

I hung around for about an hour. The prize catch was a westbound manifest freight coming into town on the Cleveland Sub with a Canadian National unit on the lead and a BC Rail unit trailing.

My last train was a westbound grain train on the New Castle Sub. It was time to pack up and head home.

But not before making my first ever visit to the Green Witch for some ice cream. It was a most fitting ending to an enjoyable day with CSX.

Article and Photographs by Craig Sanders

The W&LE train approaching Edwards Road west of Greenwich. The crops in the adjacent field are poking through the soil as another growing season gets underway.

The W&LE train approaching Edwards Road west of Greenwich. The crops in the adjacent field are poking through the soil as another growing season gets underway.

Passing some wild flowers in Greenwich as a manifest freight heads for Crestline.

Passing some wild flowers in Greenwich as a manifest freight heads for Crestline.

A notch in the vegetation enabled this shot of a westbound stack train on the long connection at Greenwich.

A notch in the vegetation enabled this shot of a westbound stack train on the long connection at Greenwich.

Canadian National power leads a manifest on the short connection at Greenwich.

Canadian National power leads a manifest on the short connection at Greenwich.

My last train of the day was a westbound grain train on the New Castle Sub.

My last train of the day was a westbound grain train on the New Castle Sub.

Memorial Day Weekend With CSX–Part 1

May 27, 2013
The first train that I photographed was a manifest freight heading west. It is crossing Greenwich Townline Road 79 S.

The first train that I photographed was a manifest freight heading west. It is crossing Greenwich Townline Road 79 S.

My first visit to the reservoir at New London came on May 28, 2006, during an Akron Railroad club outing. Almost immediately, I liked the location.

I’ve been back to New London several times since then, but not so the ARRC. Having enjoyed the 2006 outing there, I pushed to have another club outing to New London and nearby Greenwich over Memorial Day weekend of 2012.

But no one wanted to go or could not go so the outing never happened. I pushed again for the club to go to New London over the Labor Day weekend, but again there was no interest.

This year I decided to have my own outing to New London on Memorial Day weekend Sunday.

I arrived shortly before 9 a.m. after picking up breakfast at McDonalds. The skies were clear and the temperatures a bit cool. There was a light breeze that made ripples in the water.

This jacket weather was quite a contrast from the 2006 Memorial Day weekend.

I had another motivation for going to New London. Ever since Norfolk Southern revived its steam program and painted 20 diesels in heritage liveries, I’ve all but forgotten railfanning CSX. It was high time to spend a day with an old friend.

Train traffic through New London was brisk early. I saw three trains roll past before I had finished eating breakfast.

After getting a couple of ground-level shots, I climbed atop the reservoir.

Nothing out of the ordinary came past in terms of motive power or train consists. It was the typical daily traffic with the usual CSX power.

During the 2006 outing, we had seen the CSX executive train. But nothing extraordinary came by today and the only foreign power that I saw was BNSF.

Nonetheless, I was enjoying myself. There is something relaxing about sitting next to a body of water.

I wondered what other club members were doing today. Some I knew were in Pennsylvania chasing Nickel Plate Road No. 765. Another club member had a trip to Pittsburgh planned.

My thoughts were interrupted by hearing on the radio a K train taking the southeast connection at Greenwich.

That got me off the top of reservoir and driving toward Nova to get yet another shot of a train and the tower that seems to be cheating demolition with each passing day.

Back on the reservoir less than an hour later, I heard train after train on the ex-B&O while the ex-Big Four through New London was silent.

The lull would last nearly two hours before the Cleveland Subdivision sprang back to life and a steady stream of trains returned.

By mid afternoon I was thirsty and feeling it was time to move on. Did I want to go over to Greenwich? Up to Wellington and a stop at the Dairy Queen? Or perhaps it was time to mosey toward home?

I heard the rumble of locomotives working hard. My decision was about to be made.

Article and Photographs by Craig Sanders

Tank train shots have almost become cliche. But they still intrigue me.

Tank train shots have almost become cliche. But they still intrigue me.

A red house and a locomotive nose in a view taken from atop the reservoir.

A red house and a locomotive nose in a view taken from atop the reservoir.

The image was recorded in Ohio, but it could have been in Kansas. Everything in this eastbound grain train carried BNSF markings.

The image was recorded in Ohio, but it could have been in Kansas. Everything in this eastbound grain train carried BNSF markings.

The reservoir is not the only body of water at this site.

The reservoir is not the only body of water at this site.

I don't know if these ties are awaiting pick up by the railroad or they are going to be used to create a set of steps from the parking lot to the top of the reservoir.

I don’t know if these ties are awaiting pick up by the railroad or they are going to be used to create a set of steps from the parking lot to the top of the reservoir.

A track inspector looks over Track No. 1 as he travels toward New London.

A track inspector looks over Track No. 1 as he travels toward New London.

What is a photograph in May witout flowers? Some wild daisies sway in the wind as an eastbound stack train passes.

What is a photograph in May witout flowers? Some wild daisies sway in the wind as an eastbound stack train passes.