Posts Tagged ‘CSX finances’

CSX Reports 2nd Quarter Net Income Up

July 19, 2017

CSX reported this week that its net profit rose nearly 33 percent in the second quarter.

However, when controlling for the effects of $122 million in restructuring charges, the net profit was up just 15 percent.

Most of those charges involved reimbursing CEO E. Hunter Harrison and hedge fund Mantle Ridge for salary and benefits that Harrison gave up because his left his job as head of Canadian Pacific five months early.

Discounting the restructuring charges, CSX posted an operating ratio of 63.2 percent for the second quarter of 2017. Taking the restructuring charges into account, the operating ratio was 67.4 percent compared to 68.9 percent compared with the second quarter of 2016.

An operating ratio is a measure of company efficiency that compares operating expenses to net sales. The smaller the ratio, the greater a company’s ability to generate profit if its revenues fall.

Adjusting for restructuring charges, CSX expects a full-year operating ratio in the mid-60s,  with earnings per share growth of around 25 percent off the 2016 reported base of $1.81, and free cash flow before dividends of around $1.5 billion.

CSX reported revenue of $2.9 billion, an increase of 8 percent from $2.7 billion in the 2016 second quarter. Expenses fell 6 percent, led by a 15-percent drop in fuel costs.

The restructuring charges also included $22 million for management layoffs. The CSX management ranks have fallen by 951 employees this year.

CSX said that during the quarter its train velocity was up 3 percent compared with the same period in 2016.

Terminal dwell time was down 2 percent. On-time originations were 88 percent and on-time arrivals were 79 percent, a 14-percent gain over 2016.

During the second quarter of this year, CSX said it had an 8 percent increase in revenue following a 2 percent traffic increase. Freight rates were up nearly 4 percent.

CSX said its pricing and volume gains were led by export coal. Merchandise and intermodal pricing gains were 2.2 percent, which CSX said reflected the continued “challenging freight marketplace.”

Coal traffic was up 7 percent while intermodal rose 3 percent. Merchandise traffic fell 2 percent, which the railroad attributed to across-the-board declines in virtually every category.

For the quarter, CSX reported net earnings of $510 million, or 55 cents per share, up from $445 million, or 47 cents per share, a year ago. Excluding the restructuring charges, CSX reported earnings of 64 cents per share.

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CSX Declares 11% Dividend for 1st Quarter

April 25, 2017

CSX last week declared an 11 percent increase in its quarterly dividend while also announcing that it will spend $1 billion to buy back shares of its stock.

The railroad expects to issue financial guidance as it applies the precision railroading model to its operations.

The quarterly dividend, which increased from 18 cents to 20 cents, is payable on June 15 to shareholders of record as of May 31.

“Although we are just in the beginning phase of making changes to our network, we are off to a great start,” said President and Chief Executive Officer E. Hunter Harrison in a news release. “These changes are critical to driving strong, sustainable service for our customers and superior value for our shareholders.”

During 2017, CSX said that it expects to achieve record gains in efficiency and a step-function improvement in its key financial measures this year given continued economic growth and stable coal markets.

It predicted that its operating ratio for the year will fall in the mid-60s and earnings-per-share will grow 25 percent off the 2016 reported base of $1.81.

CSX said that the stock buyback program should be completed by the end of the first quarter of 2018.

CSX 1st Quarter Net Income up 2%

April 21, 2017

CSX said on Thursday that its first quarter 2017 net income rose 2 percent to $362 million, or 39 cents per share.

In a news release, CSX said that discounting a $173 million restructuring charge, the adjusted earnings were 51 cents per share.

Those numbers compare with net income of $356 million, or 37 cents per share in the first quarter of 2016.

During the first quarter of this year revenue was up 10 percent to $2.87 billion compared with $2.6 billion in 2016.

CSX attributed the revenue growth to volume growth across most markets, overall core pricing gains and increased fuel recovery.

The railroad believes that its second quarter outlook is favorable because of anticipated growth in most markets, including agriculture and food, export coal, fertilizers, forest products, intermodal and minerals.

The business outlook is neutral outlook for automotive, chemicals, metals and equipment. The domestic coal market has an unfavorable outlook for domestic coal.

CEO E. Hunter Harrison said during a conference call that CSX expects to have an operating ratio in 2017 in the mid-60s, earnings per share growth of around 25 percent off the 2016 reported base of $1.81, and free cash flow before dividends of around $1.5 billion.

The CSX board of directors have approved a $1 billion share repurchase program, which management expects to complete by the end of the first quarter of 2018.

CSX began buying back shares of its stock in April 2015 and has spent $2 billion on that to date.

As for capital spending, CSX now expects to invest $2.1 billion in 2017, including approximately $270 million for Positive Train Control.

More than half of the 2017 capital spending will be used to sustain core infrastructure with the balance allocated to projects supporting profitable growth, efficiency initiatives and service improvements.

CSX trimmed its capital budget for this year by $100 million. Some planned capital projects are being paused as management continues to study its terminal and operating plans.

As expected, CSX plans to continue creating longer passing sidings, particularly in the Chicago-Florida corridor where train lengths are limited by 6,500-foot sidings.

Under the Michael Ward administration, CSX had announced plans to extending or add 27 sidings in that corridor. Harrison expects to move some sidings to create a longer siding elsewhere.

“If we have sidings that are too short for the longer trains, we’re certainly not going to leave those sitting in the ground and not being utilized,” he said. “We’ll pick up one 6,500-foot siding and move it 15 miles down the railroad and put it with another 6,500. We’ve got a 13,000-foot siding.”

Since Harrison took over as CEO last month, CSX has laid off 765 employees – about 3 percent of its workforce – and further announcements are expected of continued cost cutting initiatives.

CSX chopped a record $420 million of expenses in 2016 and expects to top that this year.

Among the expected moves will be consolidating the railroad’s nine divisions. Also likely to be consolidated are the nine dispatching centers CSX now operates.

The streamlining of operations will result in 550 of the railroad’s 4,400 locomotives being removed from service and stored by the end of the summer. CSX has already mothballed another 550 locomotives.  About 25,000 freight cars will be stored.

CSX wants to impose a balance of operations over seven days a week and reduce the average terminal dwell time from 26 hours to somewhere in the high teens.

During the conference call, Harrison suggested that he does not expect any mergers or acquisitions to occur during the four-year life of his contract.

CSX Makes Traffic Gains, Still Faces Challenges

February 18, 2016

A CSX executive told a financial conference on Wednesday that falling coal traffic, the effects of a strong U.S. dollar and low global commodity prices challenged the railroad in 2015 and continue to offer strong headwinds as it navigates through 2016.

Chief Financial Officer Frank Lonegro told the Barclays Industrial Select Conference in Miami that in the past five years CSX has grown its merchandise and intermodal business faster than the economy and delivered strong pricing and efficiency gains.

Lonegro said that has enabled CSX to produce earnings per share of 4 percent and post an operating ratio below 70 percent in 2015.

CSX logo 1He said CSX expects its coal volume to fall more than 20 percent and most other markets to continue posting year-over-year declines in 2016.

“Based on the trends so far this year, we expect volume to decline in the mid-high single digits this quarter and to gradually moderate as we move through the year,” Lonegro said. “We expect first quarter earnings to decline significantly, reflecting both this volume environment and the fact that we are cycling more than $100 million in unique items from the first quarter of 2015.”

Lonegro told conference attendees that in 2016 CSX plans to reap $200 million in productivity savings.

The railroad expects to further reduce structural resources and match resources with volume declines near term while also remaining well-positioned to serve demand shifts once the economic challenges begin to subside.

“In this environment, we continue to focus on the things most in our control, including delivering safe, reliable service that increases operational efficiency and supports strong pricing for the value we provide to customers,” Lonegro said. “As we look toward a future with significantly less coal, our strategy includes rationalizing and realigning the network to match decreased demand in some markets and adjust to increases in others, investing in clearance and terminal projects to leverage intermodal growth, and optimizing technology to serve the CSX of tomorrow as we continue to target a mid-60s operating ratio longer term.”