Posts Tagged ‘CSX in Akron Ohio’

Chessie System Motive Power Two for Tuesday

November 2, 2020

They are both CSX trains, but are running with lead locomotives still wearing Chessie System colors and markings.

The top image is an eastbound in Easton during what looks to be hunting season in fall 1987.

The top image shows a westbound in Akron on Feb. 28, 1988.

Photographs by Robert Farkas

Its Chessie, Oops, CSX in Akron

August 14, 2020

You’re forgiven if you thought at first glance this was a Chessie System train. It does have a Chessie leader and four Chessie boxcars behind the motive power.

But a closer look shows the trailing locomotives are lettered for CSX. The train is westbound in Akron on April 9, 1983.

Photograph by Robert Farkas

Getting Reacquainted With the Railroads of Akron on a Gorgeous Autumn Sunday Railfan Outing

November 27, 2016

A Wheeling & Lake Erie stone train takes head room on the trestle spanning the valley of the Ohio & Erie Canal.

A Wheeling & Lake Erie stone train takes head room on the trestle spanning the valley of the Ohio & Erie Canal.

Good things happen when you go out on an autumn railfan outing with Roger Durfee.

I met up with my fellow Akron Railroad Club member in early November on a Sunday morning for some autumn railfanning around Akron.

We’ve done this in the past and I’ve come back with some very good autumn foliage images of trains images, some of the best I’ve made.

We had a plan of sorts that we didn’t quite wind up fully implementing because events kept interfering.

We didn’t know when we set out that morning that we’d have the opportunity to photograph three Wheeling & Lake Erie trains.

I’ve long said that I usually wind up getting the W&LE when I’m out looking for something else and that is what happened on this day.

Aside from capturing the W&LE, we also inspected the current state of affairs at Voris Street, found that the Amtrak station in Amtrak hasn’t changed much since the rail passenger carrier left Akron more than a decade ago, and took the time to visit the former AC&Y Building in downtown Akron.

We also stopped by Northside Station on the Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad to photograph a departing National Park Scenic train and visited Wingfoot Lake State Park to catch the arrival of Wingfoot Two on a flight from Columbus where it had helped TV cover the Ohio State-Nebraska football game on a Saturday night.

As mentioned in another post, we also visited Akron Junction to check out how things have changed there with CSX removing most of the tracks on the Valley Line level.

En route to Akron Junction we stopped so I could photograph the former Erie bridge over North Forge Street. The names of the cities that the Erie served have faded away, but the Erie herald is still prominent.

Did I mention that we caught CSX intermodal train Q137 at Market Street?

All in all, it was, as Roger remarked as it was winding down, a well-rounded day.

Here is a selection of photographs showing what we landed.

Article and Photographs by Craig Sanders

The first stop on our Sunday outing was the Gorge Metropark to photograph the remains of the bridge that once carried the Northern Ohio Traction & Light Company interurban cars across the Cuyahoga River.

The first stop on our Sunday outing was the Gorge Metropark to photograph the remains of the bridge that once carried the Northern Ohio Traction & Light Company interurban cars across the Cuyahoga River.

The CVSR National Park Scenic departs Akron station, which has been decorated for the Polar Express trains.

The CVSR National Park Scenic departs Akron station, which has been decorated for the Polar Express trains.

Here comes the Q137 past the site of the second Akron Union Depot. That is Perkins Street in the background.

Here comes the Q137 past the site of the second Akron Union Depot. That is Perkins Street in the background.

Shadows from a billboard creep over the lead unit of westbound Q137 as it approaches Market Street.

Shadows from a billboard creep over the lead unit of westbound Q137 as it approaches Market Street.

The last railroad to use this bridge was Conrail, but the Erie heritage is still quite visible.

The last railroad to use this bridge was Conrail, but the Erie heritage is still quite visible.

There are fewer tracks at Akron Junction now, but the coaling tower still stands.

There are fewer tracks at Akron Junction now, but the coaling tower still stands.

Moving out onto the trestle built decades ago by the Akron, Canton & Youngstown.

Moving out onto the trestle built decades ago by the Akron, Canton & Youngstown.

Contrary to appearances, this W&LE stone train is making a backup move on the CSX New Castle Sub.

Contrary to appearances, this W&LE stone train is making a backup move on the CSX New Castle Sub.

Catching this ABC transfer job approaching Voris Street was an unexpected bonus.

Catching this ABC transfer job approaching Voris Street was an unexpected bonus.

Crossing Voris Street, which is, tehnically, closed to vehicle traffic.

Crossing Voris Street, which is, tehnically, closed to vehicle traffic.

It took longer than we expected, but the ABC transfer job finally showed up in southeast Akron near Goodyear Boulevard.

It took longer than we expected, but the ABC transfer job finally showed up in southeast Akron near Goodyear Boulevard.

Another view of the ABC job as it returns to Brittain Yard.

Another view of the ABC job as it returns to Brittain Yard.

We waited until early afternoon to photograph at Rock Cut Siding the stone train we had seen earlier in the day.

We waited until early afternoon to photograph at Rock Cut Siding the stone train we had seen earlier in the day.

Here comes the third W&LE train of the day, but contrary to a post on Facebook it did not have a pair of "tiger stripes" for motive power.

Here comes the third W&LE train of the day, but contrary to a post on Facebook it did not have a pair of “tiger stripes” for motive power.

Cruising along the hedges along North Street near East High School.

Cruising along the hedges along North Street near East High School.

Wingfoot Two touches down at its base near Suffield across Wingfoot Lake as seen from Wingfoot Lake State Park.

Wingfoot Two touches down at its base near Suffield across Wingfoot Lake as seen from Wingfoot Lake State Park.

 

Taking the Farkas Challenge: One Afternoon When Akron’s First Railroad was in its Final Days

August 1, 2016

Farkas Antibus

The first train chugged into Akron on July 4, 1852, amid much celebration. It came from Hudson on the Akron Branch of the newly-built Cleveland & Pittsburgh.

Akron’s first rail line eventually became part of the mighty Pennsylvania Railroad network and the Akron Branch was extended to Columbus.

Shown is a CSX rail train on the former Akron Branch on Sept. 30, 2001. It would be one of the last trains to use the line within Akron proper.

The image was made by Richard Antibus and is my nomination on his behalf for the Farkas challenge.

A CSX train is on these rails because the railroad had considered rehabilitating the Akron Branch and using it as a second mainline between AY (Arlington Street) and Cuyahoga Falls.

Instead, the Akron branch was abandoned and the rails were pulled up. The track remains in place between Cuyahoga Falls and Hudson, having been railbanked by Akron Metro. But those rails have been dormant for several years.

Likewise it has been a while since the PRR position light signals here have been used and one signal head has been turned to show that it is out of service.

The other signal was probably used as a “distant signal” in advance of AY, a role it will no longer be serving for much longer.

So much of Akron’s railroad history is “what used to be.”

Sic transit gloria mundi is a Latin expression that has been widely interpreted to mean “wordly things are fleeting.”

And so it would seem are railroad lines. The Akron Branch served Akron well for more than a century, so we wouldn’t necessarily call its existence fleeting.

Yet for those in the Akron Railroad Club who grew up in or near Akron, their acquaintance with the Akron Branch has been quite fleeting.

Article by Craig Sanders, Photograph by Richard Antibus

Taking the Farkas Challenge: Railroads Helped Make Akron the Rubber Capital of the World

July 11, 2016

Farkas Surdyk

Akron has long described itself as the nation’s rubber capital. That’s no longer true for the rubber industry has all but vanished here.

Even though the rubber plants have closed – and most of them have been razed – and the headquarters of most of the rubber companies have moved elsewhere, the rubber industry will always be a major part of Akron’s identity.

For the Farkas challenge, I have nominated this image by Marty Surdyk because it harkens back to the era when rubber factories were located all over town.

Shown is an eastbound CSX auto rack passing the Firestone Tire & Rubber Company plant in South Akron.

That this is an auto rack train is significant because at one time the vast majority of tires that U.S. automotive makers put on their automobiles at the factory had been manufactured in Akron.

By the time this photograph was made in August 1988, the rubber age in Akron was all but over.

Between the train and the Firestone plant is the remnants of South Akron Yard of the Pennsylvania Railroad. It was used by Conrail at the time, but not for much longer.

To the right of the train is an open space where the Erie Railroad/Erie Lackawanna tracks used to be. Now all that is left is some ballast.

Akron is not as well known for railroads as some places, but they played a key role in the city’s industrial heritage. Akron could not have become was it was without the railroads.

Article by Craig Sanders, Photograph by Marty Surdyk

Military Train Marches Through Akron

May 19, 2016

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I caught a westbound military move on Tuesday this week. It was a train of containers and equipment from the former Ravenna Ordinance Plant. I shot it in Akron and have included a good sampling of the loads. It carried CSX symbol W864-16.

Photographs by Roger Durfee

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‘Phoebe Snow’ Does CSX New Castle Sub

July 13, 2015

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The Lackawanna heritage unit of Norfolk Southern made an appearance last Saturday on the New Castle Subdivision of CSX.

Coming over CSX from Delaware gave several days of advance notice for this trip.

Early Saturday morning, the empty oil train that it was leading pulled into the yard at Connellsville, Pennsylvania, for its 1,000 mile inspection.  This took about eight to nine hours before getting underway again.

Progress through Pittsburgh was slow going and we headed to New Castle, Pennsylvania, which would be the next crew change point.

After getting a couple pictures in New Castle we headed a little west toward Lowellville, Ohio.

About a half hour later the “Pheobe Snow” came through. We chased it to Youngstown, barely missing it there.

The next stop was Akron where I got it at the location of the old Erie freight house, which is now an apartment complex catering to University of Akron students.  Here my chase ended as the sky had clouded up.

Article and Photographs by Todd Dillon

Baby it was C-C-C-old in Akron on Saturday

January 12, 2015

The Q015 passes through the industrial area of South Akron in a view made from Miller Street. The track veering off the right was a lead track used by the Pennsylvania Railroad to serve the industries here. It is almost 11 a.m. and the temperature was 5 degrees.

The Q015 passes through the industrial area of South Akron in a view made from Miller Avenue. The track veering off the right was a lead track used by the Pennsylvania Railroad to serve the industries here. It is almost 11 a.m. and the temperature was 5 degrees.

Back in late December when Northeast Ohio was in the midst of a snow drought, I told Roger Durfee that I’d call him when winter returned. “Make my phone ring,” he replied.

Last Saturday morning I made the call. It had snowed during the week. It wasn’t a particularly deep snow cover, but winter had returned.

An arctic high pressure system had blanketed the region since Wednesday. As I prepared to head to Akron to meet up with Roger, the temperature fell to its low point of the day, minus 2. By the time I got to the Akron area, it had risen to zero.

We learned that CSX had a parade of five westbounds headed our way. We missed the first of those, an iron ore train, but were able to get into position to capture the next four.

Our vantage points primarily were in downtown Akron, but we also ventured out to Lambert on the Akron-Barberton border.

By noon the temperature had reached a “balmy” 7 degrees.

Yes, it was cold, particularly if you were facing the wind. I’m sure the wind chill was below zero.

Yet it wasn’t as bad as I feared it would be. I had dressed warmly and we spent a lot of time in Roger’s Jeep.

Just by the look of the images that I made, you can’t tell that the temperature was in the single digits.

The photos we made could easily have been taken on a day when the temperatures were in the 20s or even the 30s.

Yet whenever I look at these images, I’ll be reminded of how we went out into some the coldest air to hit Akron this winter and came back with something. There is something satisfying about that.

Article and photographs by Craig Sanders

The downtown Akron skyline looms in the background as the Q359 makes its way west through downtown Akron. The view is from the Thornton Street overpass.

The downtown Akron skyline looms in the background as the Q375 makes its way west through downtown Akron. The view is from the Thornton Street overpass.

Another view of the Q375 from the Thornton Street overpass. We would photograph this train again later at Lambert.

Another view of the Q359 from the Thornton Street overpass. We would photograph this train again later at Lambert.

We got down at ground level for the Q359. catching the train opposite of the Akron Metro bus transfer station off to the left and out of sight.

We got down at ground level for the Q375, catching the train opposite of the Akron Metro bus transfer station off to the left and out of sight.

There wasn't quite enough snow on the rails to make an impressive showing of flying snow, but that is not to say there wasn't some swirling snow. The tank cars of the Q359 kick up some misty snow as they pass through downtown Akron. The building in the background is the apartment built on the site of the former Erie Railroad freight station.

There wasn’t quite enough snow on the rails to make an impressive showing of flying snow, but that is not to say there wasn’t some swirling snow. The tank cars of the Q375 kick up some misty snow as they pass through downtown Akron. The building in the background above the tank cars is the housing complex built on the site of the former Erie Railroad freight station.

The Q375 sat at Lambert for a while to wait for the Q137 to go around it on Track 2. With the intermodal train out of the way, the manifest freight gets underway at Lambert. By now the temperature had risen to 7 degrees.

The Q359 sat at Lambert for a while to wait for the Q137 to go around it on Track 2. With the intermodal train out of the way, the manifest freight gets underway at Lambert. By now the temperature had risen to 7 degrees.

 

 

New Nucelar Vessel Passes Through Akron

June 26, 2014

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CSX ran a W860 west last week that featured a new unit that will be used to transport spent nuclear fuel. I’m not sure the routes the loaded ones will take. This train passed through Akron (shown above) on the New Castle Subdivision.

Photographs by Roger Durfee

CSX Establishes New Locals on New Castle Sub

June 8, 2014

CSX has changed operations of the trains on the New Castle Subdivision that do local work between Willard, Ohio, and New Castle, Pa.

New trains Q330 and Q331 began operation on June 2 as over the road locals. They work en route at Ohio Junction (Youngstown area), Lordstown, Akron, Warwick and Sterling.

Annulled were locals D763 and D740, but the D750 and D762 continue to work daily.

Reportedly, a local has also been established to work from Lester to Akron and return.