Posts Tagged ‘CSX’

CSX CEO Ward to Retire on May 31

February 21, 2017

On Tuesday CSX Corp. announced that Chairman and Chief Executive Michael Ward and President Clarence Gooden will retire, effective May 31.

Fredrik Eliasson, a 22-year veteran of the company and current Chief Sales and Marketing

Michael Ward

Michael Ward

Officer, has been appointed as President effective Feb. 15.

The Jacksonville, Fla.-based railroad in a statement described the changes as an “orderly transition” of senior leadership, adding it is continuing discussions with Hunter Harrison and activist investor Mantle Ridge regarding Harrison becoming CEO at CSX.

CSX said that the elevation of Eliasson to the president’s post was not intended to affect the discussions with Harrison of Mantle Ridge, which owns less than 5 percent of CSX stock.

“On behalf of CSX’s Board of Directors, I want to thank Michael and Clarence for their many years of dedicated service and contributions to our company,” said Edward J. Kelly III, Presiding Director. “Michael has helped build CSX into one of the nation’s leading transportation and logistics companies, and Clarence has similarly provided valuable leadership across CSX’s sales, marketing and operations teams. We wish both the best in their retirements.”

Eliasson, 46, will maintain his current responsibilities in his new position. He has served as executive vice president and Chief Sales and Marketing Officer since September 2015, and prior to that was Chief Financial Officer from 2012-15. He joined CSX in 1995.

In an other development, Ward said today that 1,000 CSX management positions would be eliminated in a cost cutting move.

The job cuts will affect positions at CSX headquarters in Jacksonville, Florida, as well as various field offices.

Numbers, Numbers. How Much is Hunter Worth?

February 20, 2017

When E. Hunter Harrison retired early from Canadian Pacific, news accounts noted that he left millions of dollars on the table in exchange for a limited waiver of a non-compete clause so he could pursue the CSX CEO job.

As it turned out, Harrison did no such thing.

On TransportationThe hedge fund Mantle Ridge agreed to pay Harrison the money he gave up at CP.

Mantle Ridge in turn wants CSX to reimburse it for the cash it guaranteed Harrison for walking away early from CP.

CSX claims that Harrison is seeking a four-year contract worth $300 million. That $75 million a year would make him not just the highest paid North American Class 1 railroad executive but also place him among the highest-paid CEOs in America.

By comparison, the man Harrison wants to replace, Michael Ward, earned $2.9 million in 2015. Another retired Class 1 CEO, Charles “Wick” Moorman, who agreed to take Amtrak’s top job for $1 a year, although he is also eligible for performance-based bonuses of up to $500,000 a year.

But Mantle Ridge counters that Harrison’s compensation package would actually be worth $200 million of which $120 million are stock options.

Such is life in the rare air of the corporate suite where eye-popping salaries are justified by saying a CEO brings a “unique skill set” to the job.

Executive compensation experts interviewed by Trains magazine said Harrison’s pay demands are at the high end of the scale, but not unreasonable by CEO pay standards.

Once the news broke that Harrison was seeking the top CSX job, the value of CSX stock jumped $10.4 billion, an increase of 30 percent.

Ben Branch, a finance professor at the Isenberg School of Management at the University of Massachusetts, told Trains that CSX stockholders might think Harrison has a “dramatic plan” for improving the company.

“It’s rare,” Branch said. “You don’t have many situations where a CEO almost single-handedly is expected to deliver dramatic improvement.”

Jason Shiel, a managing director of finance firm Cowen and Company, told Railway Age the pay demanded by Harrison is a negotiating point and he is likely to receive less, although not necessarily much less.

Harrison is known for his scheduled precision railroading operating philosophy, which some railroad industry analysts say is similar to what CSX practices now.

Ultimately, some think Harrison’s long game is to engineer a merger that creates North America’s first transcontinental railroad. It is an idea he been peddling for years and failed to pull off last year when he proposed a merger between CP and Norfolk Southern.

For us mere mortals whose primary connection with CSX is watching its trains pass by, all of this talk about eight- and nine-figure executive compensation is nothing more than a parlor game.

The numbers baffle ordinary people who have no chance in their lifetime of ever earning a salary exceeding five figures a year. Most of us can’t fathom how you become a CEO of a Fortune 500 company.

For most CSX employees, having Harrison rather than Ward at the top will make little difference.

They will continue doing what they have been doing even if there may be some changes in how they do it.

Yet it is likely that some may find themselves victims of Harrison’s expected cost cutting.

In the eyes of Harrison and other high-ranking and well-paid railroad executives, labor costs are just another number to be reduced in order to please Wall Street.

How those reductions affect individual CSX employees financially and emotionally won’t be a subject of discussion at the special CSX board meeting. It never is.

All they talk about are numbers and for most of us that is all Harrison’s pay demands are.

Mantle Ridge Disputes CSX News Release

February 18, 2017

Hedge fund Mantle Ridge took issue with some facts contained in a CSX news release issued earlier this week on the subject of E. Hunter Harrison becoming the railroad’s CEO.

CSX logo 3Mantle Ridge head Paul Hilal said he wrote to the CSX Board of Directors to take issue with the news release, in particular the size of the compensation package for Harrison and Hilal’s demands for governance changes for the CSX board.

“We owe it to the shareholders to get a deal done promptly. Let’s do it,” Hilal wrote. “If you are willing, we are glad to meet in person and hammer this out this weekend, hopefully delivering good news to the shareholders early next week.”

In the meantime, Harrison told the Wall Street Journal that he was frustrated with what he described as “chest pounding” between his investment partner and CSX, which has resulted in a stalemate in the negotiations for him take over as CSX as its CEO.

The newspaper reported that CSX had offered the CEO post to Harrison, but that Hilal, a principle at Mantle Ridge, has refused to give in on compensation and governance demands. Hilal, who is representing Harrison, has conducted most of the discussions with CSX.

Mantle Ridge holds less than 5 percent of CSX stock but wants to name six directors to the railroad’s board of directors and reduce the number of directors to 12,

In the news release, CSX said it is reluctant to allow a shareholder with such a small share of its stock to dictate the composition of its board. CSX also has described the demands to give Harrison a $300 million compensation package as “extraordinary in scope.”

The Journal said that during a recent meeting with Mantle Ridge, some CSX shareholders objected to the number of seats on the board that Mantle Ridge wants.

Hilal reportedly said during the meeting he needs to control six seats so that Harrison “has control and can execute his plan.”

CSX reportedly is objecting to paying Harrison the $89 million he gave up by leaving early as Canadian Pacific’s CEO in return for receiving a limited waiver of a non-complete clause.

Hilal contends that the compensation deal that Mantle Ridge is seeking from CSX is $200 million and includes $120 million of stock options, about half of which are tied to “very real” performance measures.

Another sticking point is the 72-year-old Harrison’s refusal to agree to have a physical exam by an independent physician.

Harrison told the Journal he was willing to negotiate his pay with the CSX board,

In his letter, Hilal contended that Harrison wants $32 million per year over four years – or $128 million – of which $20 million per year is performance-based.

“His package is worth very little unless he performs spectacularly,” Hilal wrote. As for the changes on the CSX board, Hilal said he is only seeking a seat for himself.

Harrison would occupy another seat along with four other independent directors who would be agreed upon by CSX and Mantle Ridge

“Why are we asking that new directors be added? As we’ve discussed, precision scheduled railroading requires dramatic operational and cultural change,” Hilal wrote. “Change like that starts at the top, with significant new blood on the board not wed to the old ways or legacy decisions and with no ties to any previous strategy or anyone.”

CSX Sets Special Board Meeting on March 16 to Consider Mantle Ridge Proposal to Make Hunter Harrison CEO

February 15, 2017

Hunter Harrison and the Mantle Ridge hedge fund will get their day before the CSX board of directors and shareholders.

CSX logo 1The board on Tuesday agreed to call a special meeting for March 16 at a time and place to be named later to consider the hedge fund’s “extraordinary requests.”

Mantle Ridge has proposed making Harrison the CSX CEO. Harrison last month retired early as head of Canadian Pacific so that he could, presumably, seek the top job at CSX.

Harrison and CP sought unsuccessfully to merge with Norfolk Southern l;ast year but that company’s board rejected the overtures.

In a news release, CSX said Mantle Ridge has acquired less than 5 percent of its stock but is seeking compensation and control far in excess of the scope of its stock ownership.

CSX acknowledged that it has held talks with Harrison and Mantle Ridge during which the hedge fund demanded substantial representation on the CSX Board and that Harrison immediately replace current CSX CEO Michael Ward.

The railroad said it has made several offers to Harrison and Mantle Ridge that would have made Harrison the CSX CEO and given Mantle Ridge three seats on the CSX board.

Mantle Ridge has rejected those offers and countered with its own demands, many of which focus on Harrison’s compensation and the composition of the CSX board.

One noteworthy point made in the CSX news release is that Mantle Ridge has agreed to compensate Harrison for the millions of dollars he agreed to forgo when he retired early from CP. Mantle Ridge wants CSX to make up most or all of that.

Harrison has also rejected a CSX request that he take a physical exam.

CSX said in its statement that it is wary of granting control to a shareholder who holds less than 5 percent of its stock and is demanding benefits from CSX that may exceed $100 million.

CSX said the requested reimbursement and tax indemnity could exceed $300 million and are thus extraordinary in scope and structured largely as an upfront payment and as equity grants that would be payable to Mr. Harrison upon his death or disability with only a portion of the equity grant including any performance metrics.

“The CSX Board is committed to being responsive to the interests of its shareholders and has closely observed the market reaction to Mr. Harrison’s possible employment,” the railroad said in its statement.  “Accordingly, in light of the unusual circumstances surrounding Mantle Ridge’s approach the CSX Board has decided to seek guidance from shareholders on whether CSX should agree to Mr. Harrison’s and Mantle Ridge’s proposals.

CSX said it would schedule its regular board meeting, usually held in May, after the special March meeting.

Jeffersonville Port Handled 2.2M Tons in 2016

February 14, 2017

During 2016, the Port of Indiana-Jeffersonville handled 2.2 million tons of cargo, making it the third consecutive year the port has exceeded 2 million tons of cargo.

In a news release the port said that its annual shipping total was 17 percent higher than the previous five-year average.

Ports of IndianaMajor cargoes handed at the port include steel, grain and fertilizer.

Steel shipments last year in 2016 were the second highest in port history.

There are 14 companies at the port that process or handle steel, aluminum, lubricants or plastics that support the top six automakers in the United States, port officials said.

The port is served by CSX and the Louisville & Indiana Railroad.

CSX Extends Deadline for Board Nominees

February 11, 2017

CSX on Friday said it would extend the deadline for nominations to its board of directors.

CSX logo 1The move is being seen as a ploy to give the Mantel Ridge hedge fund more time to negotiate an agreement with the railroad to make E. Hunter Harrison its CEO.

The deadline for board nominees had been Feb. 10 but has been extended to Feb. 24.

Harrison retired early from Canadian Pacific last month and has teamed up with Paul Hilal of Mantle Ridge to seek a management change at CSX.

News reports have said CSX and Harrison have had discussions about that prospect, but the number of seats on the board supported by Mantle Ridge has been a sticking point.

In retiring early from CP, Harrison gave up tens of millions in compensation in exchange for CP giving him a limited waiver of a non-compete clause.

If Harrison is successful in becoming the CEO of CSX, he would replace Michael Ward, who has said he plans to retire by 2019.

W.Va. Coal Short Line Leases Locomotive

February 9, 2017

A West Virginia short line railroad has acquired a third locomotive to help it haul coal.

West VirginiaTrains magazine reported that the Big Eagle Railroad, also known as the Winifrede Railroad, has leased GMTX GP38-2 No. 2109, a former locomotive of the Belt Railway of Chicago.

The 10-mile short line serves one customer near Winifrede and receives unit coal trains from CSX.

Warwick B&O CPL Replacements are Up

February 4, 2017

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New signals to replace the ex-Baltimore & Ohio color position light signals are going up in Warwick. As of Feb. 2, 2017, the new signal heads were turned away from the tracks.

The top image shows the westbound signal closest to Warwick Tower. The bottom image shows a westbound power move approaching this signal.

Photographs by Robert Farkas

CSX Gets SD303E ‘Echo” Locomotives

February 2, 2017

CSX has taken delivery of the first of 13 Eco locomotives that are being rebuilt from EMD SD40-2 units by Progress Rail at its plant in Muncie, Indiana.

CSX logo 3The ex-CSX units are now classified as SD40E3 and carry roster numbers in the 1700 series.

Trains magazine reported that the units will be assigned to terminals in Atlanta, Chicago, New York and Camden, New Jersey.

The SD40E3s will be assigned to yard duty and on local freights.

“The low emission locomotives are ideal for moving and sorting freight in our yards, providing a more environmentally friendly way to build trains around the clock and efficiently serve customers,” CSX Media Relations Manager Laura Phelps told Trains.

Phelps said the SD40E3s are not intended to replace SD40-3 locomotives that have been rebuilt by MotivePower in Idaho from SD40-2s.

She said CSX continues to evaluate the role that SD40-3 motive power will play at the railroad.

Consol Eyes Getting out of Coal Mine Business

February 2, 2017

A Pennsylvania company that operates coal mines in the southwest corner of the state is considering getting out of the coal business in order to focus on its natural gas  initiatives.

consol-energyConsol Energy said it may sell its coal mines as early as this year or spin them off into a entity separate from Consol.

Consol Chief Financial Officer David Khani told investors that the company lost more than $320 million loss during the fourth quarter, much of it due to declining coal business.

Among the Consol holdings in Pennsylvania are the Bailey, Enlow Fork and Harvey mines.

Consol is the largest shipper using the former Monongahela Railway, which hosts trains of CSX, Norfolk Southern and the Buffalo & Pittsburgh.

With an annual production capacity of more than 11 million tons of coal, the Bailey mine is said to be the highest capacity train loadout facility in the East with the capability of handling multiple unit trains simultaneously.

Consol is based in Cecil township near Pittsburgh.