Posts Tagged ‘E units’

Pennsy Heritage Two for Tuesday

March 23, 2021

We’ve traveled back to Aug. 1, 2004, in Orrville. Former Pennsylvania Railroad E8A Nos. 5711 and 5809, both owned by Bennett Levine, are heading eastbound home to Philadelphia on  the Fort Wayne Line of Norfolk Southern.

In the top image, the train is about to cross Ohio Route 57. In the bottom image it is passing the restored Orrville Union Depot along with the former tower and a PRR cabin car on static display.

Photographs by Robert Farkas

When PC 4321 Did Not Look So Rusty

November 25, 2016

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I enjoyed seeing the recent posting of the photo of the former Penn Central E unit in Bellevue. I’ve attached a side-by-side I put together of the same unit from when I shot it in the late 1970s over in E-Port, New Jersey, to today’s look in Bellevue (Remember my Rust Never Sleeps ARRC blog entry from a while back?). As a note, this unit is NOT part of the Mad River & NKP Railroad Museum. It is privately owned. Hope that everyone had a great Thanksgiving.

Photographs by Roger Durfee

 

A Contrast of Generations and Purposes

November 22, 2016

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One in a periodic series of images that I made last summer

Contrast always makes for an interesting image. It could be contrast of any number of things such as light and dark, large and small, short and tall.

The contrast between Norfolk Southern ES44AC No. 8055 and this former Penn Central E8A No. 4321 could not be much wider.

New versus old, still working versus retired, still wanted versus neglected, good condition versus derelict . . . the list goes on.

Let’s not forget that one engine was built to haul freight and the other was built to haul passengers.

One wound up in a museum and the other probably will one day find itself in a scrap yard.

The Penn Central Historical Society reports that No. 4321 was built for the New York Central as No. 4070, a number that should be familiar to those living in Northeast Ohio.

It worked for Penn Central and, for a time, New Jersey Transit. Since being retired from active service, the 4321 has sat in Logansport, Indiana, and now sits at the Mad River & NKP Railroad Museum in Bellevue.

Because of its position next to the Toledo District of Norfolk Southern the 4321 has appeared in countless photographs and may be as photographed as much as about anything else in the museum’s collection.

How much longer the 4321 can continue to sit rusting away without receiving even a minor cosmetic restoration is anyone’s guess.

As for the NS 8055, it was built in January 2011 so it has many years of service ahead of it. Who knows when and where I’ll see it again, but for now I know where I can find the 4321.

Article and Photograph by Craig Sanders

EL E Units Still Had Work to Do Pulling Trailer Trains After the Passenger Trains had Ended

December 20, 2015

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Erie Lackawanna Nos. 820 and 814 head an eastbound trailer train through Akron on Jan. 21, 1973. No longer needed for passenger power, the E-units were sometimes found on trailer trains. The train is crossing Voris Street with Interstate 76 in the background.

Photograph by Robert Farkas

The Whole Was More Powerful than the Parts

February 19, 2015

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It is August 12, 1972, and Mike Ondecker and I have been given permission to take photographs around the Rock Island engine facility at Joliet, Ill.

At the time, I took mostly roster shots instead of train shots. Had I concentrated on a roster shot of Rock Island 641, the shadow of the sand tower on the rear of the unit would have driven me mad.

Here was an E7A in beautiful light, yet it had that distracting shadow. Thankfully, I stepped back and got more of the whole scene.

That engine house had certainly seen better days and while the rectangular 35mm slide format cut off part of the sand tower, enough was there so that there weren’t two strange diagonally-running pipes appearing out of nowhere.

Also, a roster shot would have cropped out part of the reflection. Did I plan the image this way? No. I just took it to have something.

Yet 40 plus years later, it serves as a good example of the whole image being far more powerful than its individual parts.

Article and Photograph by Robert Farkas