Posts Tagged ‘E8A locomotives’

Literally a Grab Shot

August 29, 2021

Sometimes you don’t have time to get into position to create a photograph. The photographer reports that he probably had just changed film while inside his 1967 Volkswagon when a passenger train began leaving Toledo Central Union Terminal on Nov. 29, 1968. It’s a Penn Central train but led by former New York Central E8A No. 4062.

Photograph by Robert Farkas

EL Monday: Passenger E8A in Akron

August 16, 2021

Erie Lackawanna E8A No. 826 works in Akron in 1973. By then passenger service had been gone for three years and passenger locomotives had been redeployed into freight service. The 826 was built in February 1951 for the Erie Railroad and carried the same roster number. If you look around the edges you can see tiny slivers of the Erie passenger and freight stations.

Photograph by Robert Farkas

Tourist Railroad in Wellington

August 6, 2021

The Lorain & West Virginia is a tourist railroad based in Wellington where this photograph was made on Sept. 12, 2017. E8A No. 101 was built for the Chicago & North Western in 1950.

The railroad ran Easter trips in April and its website shows several dates for which tickets are available in October. Santa Claus trains are slated to run in November and December.

Photograph by Robert Farkas

Pennsy Heritage Two for Tuesday

March 23, 2021

We’ve traveled back to Aug. 1, 2004, in Orrville. Former Pennsylvania Railroad E8A Nos. 5711 and 5809, both owned by Bennett Levine, are heading eastbound home to Philadelphia on  the Fort Wayne Line of Norfolk Southern.

In the top image, the train is about to cross Ohio Route 57. In the bottom image it is passing the restored Orrville Union Depot along with the former tower and a PRR cabin car on static display.

Photographs by Robert Farkas

Penn Central’s Fort Pitt in Canton

January 24, 2021

It may be a Penn Central passenger train but the westbound Fort Pitt had a pair of Pennsylvania Railroad locomotives pulling it as it arrives in the station in Canton on May 30, 1968.

Nos. 4309 and 4304, a pair of E8A locomotives, are on the point today.

No. 4309 had been built for the Pennsy in January 1951 as No. 5809. It would later become an Amtrak unit, work for Conrail and end up becoming Juniata Terminal 5809 wearing a PRR livery.

The Fort Pitt, however, would not have the same history. The Pittsburgh to Chicago train survived until the coming of Amtrak when it was discontinued.

Photograph by Robert Farkas

Looks Like the Pennsy

January 19, 2021

When these photographs were taken the Pennsylvania Railroad name had been gone for more than 30 years.

There are still times when ghosts of the Pennsy can still be seen roaming. These photographs, for example, appear to show PRR passenger trains on a Pennsy route.

But in one instance the train is actually wearing a PRR-inspired paint scheme on Ohio Central’s Columbus & Ohio River subsidiary, which uses former PRR rails.

These images were taken on the same photo special from Oct. 5, 2002. They were made just west of West Lafayette and crossing the Tuscarawas River just west of Newcomerstown

Some images were made in Bedford on Norfolk Southern’s Cleveland Line, a former PRR route between Cleveland and Pittsburgh.

The train is being pulled by Bennett Levin’s Juniata Terminals E7A, which is an actual former Pennsy locomotive.

These images were made on May 8, 2011. 

Photographs by Edward Ribinskas

The Fort Pitt in Canton

November 4, 2020

The Fort Pitt was one of the most photographed Pennsylvania Railroad passenger trains in Northeast Ohio because of its schedule.

Most of the Pennsy’s passenger trains came through Canton and Massillon in the dark but the Fort Pitt was a daylight train from Pittsburgh to Chicago.

It is 1969 and the Fort Pitt is now a Penn Central train even though it still appears to be a PRR one.

On the point is E8A No. 4252. Built by EMD for the Pennsy in May 1952 as No. 5792, it would eventually receive a Penn Central livery as well as new number.

Amtrak would acquire the unit and renumber is 278. It would serve the nation’s intercity passenger carrier until being retired in May 1976.

In the photograph above, the photograph was standing on the eastbound passenger platform in Canton.

Photograph by Robert Farkas

The Brake Shoes Are Smoking in Painesville

October 18, 2020

The wayback machine has landed us in Painesville sometime in 1968. A westbound Penn Central passenger train is coming led by E8A No. 4079, which still has a full New York Central livery

This unit was built for the Central in August 1953.

Look closely and you will see brake shoe smoke, which suggests the train is going to stop at the Painesville station located just behind the photographer.

This might be unnamed Train No. 63, an unnamed New York to Chicago train that until December 1967 was been No. 59, the Chicagoan.

It is scheduled to stop in Painesville on signal only to discharge passengers at 11 a.m.

As can be seen here, the consist is head end heavy. By now No. 63 as having coaches and a diner lounge car operating from Buffalo to Chicago. There were sleeping cars on 63, including a sleeper coach — the NYC’s name for a slumber coach — but those operated only as far west as Buffalo.

It wasn’t always that way. Shortly before the Central merged with the Pennsylvania Railroad in February 1968 to form Penn Central, the NYC has assigned to No. 63 a sleeper and sleeper coach that operated from New York to Cleveland.

But that was gone by the timetable change of July 15, 1968.

Train 63 would survive until the coming of Amtrak on May 1, 1971, but be discontinued. Painesville has not had intercity rail passenger service since then although Amtrak’s Lake Shore Limited charges past the former Painesville depot six days a week now.

Photograph by Robert Farkas

EL Monday: Rainy Day in Akron

September 21, 2020

The photographer is standing on the Akron Union Station platform on a rainy day while Erie Lackawanna E8A Nos. 830 and EL 832 pass by westbound with the Lake Cities one mid-year morning in the late 1960s.

Note that EL 830 has no portholes and EL 832 has three. The Lake Cities used the former Erie passenger depot that was out of view to the left of the photographer.

It would be the last EL passenger train in Akron and made its final trips in January 1970.

Photograph by Robert Farkas

 

An Intermodal Train in Akron for EL Monday

August 24, 2020

That’s quite an interesting locomotive consist pulling this eastbound intermodal train on the Erie Lackawanna in Akron in mid 1972.

On the point is GP35 No. 2571. The trailing unit is E8A 812, which a little over two years earlier might have been seen in Akron pulling the Lake Cities.

The image was made at Voris Street, a favorite Akron railfan hangout location.

Photograph by Robert Farkas