Posts Tagged ‘freight satistics’

Pennsylvania Short Line Set Record in 2019 for Traffic

January 3, 2020

Pennsylvania-based short line Delaware-Lackawanna has reported that it set a record in 2019 for freight carloads handled, making it the third consecutive year of carload records.

The carrier handled 9,690 cars, which bested the 2018 record by 2.5 percent.

D-L said it also used $2.8 million in grants from the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation to improve its rail infrastructure, including new ties, rail, ballast and surfacing.

It also up graded two bridges. The Carbondale Rail Transload facility was recently awarded a PennDOT grant of $297,528 for upgrades and expansion.

DL is the designated rail operator for the Pennsylvania Northeast Regional Railroad Authority-owned rail lines in Lackawanna and Monroe Counties.

Freight Traffic Fell 2.1% in May

June 6, 2019

Rail freight traffic was down 2.1 percent in May the Association of American Railroads reported this week.

U.S. railroads originated 1,291,671 carloads in May 2019, which was 28,065 fewer carloads that they handled in May 2018.

The railroads originated 1,315,684 containers and trailers in May 2019, a drop of 5.9 percent, or 82,521 units, from May 2018.

The combined U.S. carload and intermodal originations in May 2019 was 2,607,355, down 4.1 percent or 110,586 carloads and intermodal units from May 2018.

Six of the 20 carload commodity categories tracked by the AAR posted gains last month.

These included: petroleum & petroleum products, up 13,513 carloads or 25.9 percent; chemicals, up 2,630 carloads or 1.6 percent; and non-metallic minerals, up 2,534 carloads or 12.4 percent. Commodities that fell included: crushed stone, sand & gravel, down 20,358 carloads or 14.6 percent; grain, down 6,830 carloads or 5.7 percent; and primary metal products, down 3,117 carloads or 6.4 percent.

“The current weakness in the rail traffic numbers is due to a combination of factors,” said AAR Senior Vice President of Policy and Economics, John T. Gray. “These include flooding in the Midwest that’s been hindering the operations of railroads and many of their customers.

“More important is heightened economic uncertainty that’s being made worse by increased trade-related tensions; higher tariffs leading to reductions or disruptions of international trade, and lower industrial output. In addition, some rail markets are undergoing rapid change. For example, locally sourced frac sand in Texas is displacing sand that used to be shipped in by rail. Just by themselves, these reduced sand movements are having a material negative impact on total rail carloads.”

Excluding coal, carloads were down 26,417 carloads, or 2.9 percent, in May 2019 compared with May 2018. Excluding coal and grain, carloads were down 19,587 carloads, or 2.4 percent.

Most Freight Traffic Gained in June

July 6, 2018

Rail traffic on U.S. railroads continued to grow in June with 13 of the 20 car load categories monitored by the Association of American Railroads showing gains.

U.S. railroads originated 1,080,769 carloads in June 2018, up 2.0 percent, or 21,098 carloads, from June 2017.

The railroads originated 1,159,973 containers and trailers, an increase of 6.3 percent, or 68,689 units, from the same month last year.

Combined U.S. carload and intermodal originations in June 2018 were 2,240,742, up 4.2 percent, or 89,787 carloads and intermodal units from June 2017.

“Rail traffic in June was consistent with a healthy economy,” said AAR Senior Vice President of Policy and Economics John T. Gray.

Gray noted it was the third consecutive month in which at least 14 categories posted increase, the the longest such streak since late 2014.

However, Gray warned that a potential trade war could bring change quickly.

Categories posting increases in traffic last included petroleum & petroleum products, up 7,411 carloads or 19.7 percent; crushed stone, sand & gravel, up 7,276 carloads or 7.1 percent; and chemicals, up 4,608 carloads or 3.7 percent.

Commodities that saw declines included coal, down 9,396 carloads or 2.7 percent; nonmetallic minerals, down 3,552 carloads or 18.8 percent; and waste & nonferrous scrap, down 618 carloads or 3.8 percent.

Excluding coal, carloads were up 30,494 carloads, or 4.3 percent, in June 2018 from June 2017. Excluding coal and grain, carloads were up 25,979 carloads, or 4.2 percent.

U.S. Freight Traffic Up 3.3% in April

May 3, 2018

Freight traffic on U.S. railroads was up 3.3 percent in April when compared to the same month a year ago the Association of American Railroads reported on Wednesday.

The railroads originated 1,051,026 carloads last month, which was 34,020 more carloads than April 2017.

AAR reported that the railroads originated 1,099,000 containers and trailers in April 2018, up 6.8 percent, or 69,630 units, from the same month last year.

Combined U.S. carload and intermodal originations in April 2018 were 2,150,026, up 5.1 percent, or 103,650 carloads and intermodal units from April 2017.

“Total U.S. rail traffic so far this year is a shade below where it was in 2015, but otherwise is higher than it’s been in the last 10 years,” said AAR Senior Vice President John T. Gray in a statement.

“Additionally, 15 of the 20 commodity categories we track had higher carloads in April 2018 than in April 2017, the most since January 2015. That’s good news for railroads and good news for the economy.”

Fifteen of the 20 carload commodity categories tracked by the AAR each month saw gains compared with April 2017.

These included crushed stone, sand and gravel, up 8,466 carloads or 8.6 percent; coal, up 7,337 carloads or 2.4 percent; and grain, up 5,305 carloads or 5.7 percent.

Commodities that saw declines in April 2018 from April 2017 included nonmetallic minerals, down 2,513 carloads or 13 percent; waste and nonferrous scrap, down 1,056 carloads or 7.1 percent; and primary forest products, down 651 carloads or 14.6 percent.

Excluding coal, carloads were up 26,683 carloads, or 3.8 percent, in April 2018 from April 2017. Excluding coal and grain, carloads were up 21,378 carloads, or 3.5 percent.