Posts Tagged ‘GP38-2’

Short Line Paints Locomotive in IT-Inspired Livery

November 7, 2019

An Indiana short line railroad has repainted a high-hood GP38-2 into an Illinois Terminal inspired livery.

The Indiana Eastern Railroad applied the green and yellow to a former Southern Railway unit recently and put it into revenue service this week.

IE had purchased the unit from Norfolk Southern in October 2017. The unit was once used by NS at a training center in Georgia.

Built in September 1979, No. 5255 replaces at the IE a pair of Alger, Winslow & Western SD9s as the railroad’s primary power.

No. 5255 made its first revenue trip with its new look on Nov. 4.

George Andres, CEO and co-owner of the IE and a sister operation Ohio South Central Railroad, tells Trains magazine that the inspiration for the new livery came from a combination of the “John Deere Green” IT livery used on its GP20’s and the original IT light green with yellow noses used on GP7s.

No. 5255 can  be found working in and around IE’s home in Cottage Grove, Indiana, on most weekday mornings.

IE still has its SD9s with one serving as a backup and the other stored serviceable.

 

Going, Going But Not Yet Gone

August 11, 2016

NS and truck 03-x

In recent years, I’ve made it a point to photograph Norfolk Southern high-hood locomotives when I see them.

Show above is my most recent sighting of a high-hood. It was the third of three units on a train departing Bellevue.

Because it was placed behind two massive Union Pacific units, the GP38-2 looked a little out of place.

NS plans to auction off 50 GP38-2 locomotives this month although that doesn’t mean that we’ve seen the last of them in revenue service.

In a recent column posted on the Trains magazine website, Jim Wrinn, the magazine’s editor in chief, noted that he grew up seeing the high hoods in North Carolina as an everyday occurrence.

Of course, that was when they worked for the Southern Railway. Jim ended his column saying he didn’t think he would see another GP38-2 in NS paint.

But a poster said in response that this is not the beginning of the end for the GP38-2 on NS. That poster noted that NS has 68 GP38-2 units in storage, which includes the 50 it plans to sell.

That leaves about 150 of them in revenue service. Some might be rebuilt, but receive a short hood in the process.

I don’t know if No. 5114 is slated to be auctioned off, placed in storage or to continue in revenue service.

But high hood locomotives on Class 1 railroads aren’t what they use to be. So when I see one, I’ll do more than watch it pass by.

Article and Photograph by Craig Sanders

Railroading as it Once Was: The Only Day I Got Paid to Take a Ride on a Reading Locomotive

June 9, 2016
No. 2187 as it looked in Conrail paint with my work train.

No. 2187 as it looked in Conrail paint with my work train.

No. 2187 as it looked when it still wore some of its original Reading Livery. By now it had been patched as it sat in Rutherford, Pennsylvania in September 1978.

No. 2187 as it looked when it still wore some of its original Reading Livery. By now it had been patched as it sat in Rutherford, Pennsylvania in September 1978.

In April 2001 I was called for a work train. I took a taxi from Cleveland to Alliance and worked as needed.

Normally, work trains rated older units, often ex-Conrail GP38-2s. This day was no exception to the older unit rule, but imagine my surprise to see this motive power when I arrived in Alliance. It was an Ohio Central GP30, former Conrail and originally Reading Lines. I sure didn’t expect to be working on a Reading GP30 in 2001.

The train was a cable plow train, a machine that dug a trench and dropped fiber optics tubing into the hole.

Note the large spools of plastic conduit both on our train and off to the side. It was certainly a different assignment from the normal road jobs I was working at the time.

The day went smoothly, although it was long, with a taxi ride back to Cleveland once we were done.

It has been the only time I’ve been paid to work with a former RDG GP30.

Article and Photographs by Roger Durfee