Posts Tagged ‘Kodak slide film’

The Way it Was: Low Cost Train Watching, Dropping Film at the Processing Plant

March 6, 2022

Some of you may remember having met Lou Sabetto in Berea in past years.

He photographed Cleveland railroad operations between the 1930s and 1980s before his death.

Although Sabetto had a vast photograph collection, it is thought to have been lost after he entered an assisted living facility due to heath issues.

Sheldon Lustig, another Berea regular, once commented that when he asked Sabetto how he was cataloging his collection, he pointed to his head and said “it’s all up here.”

Lustig recently related another story about Sabetto in an email distributed to subscribers of the Northern Ohio Association of Railway Societies email list.

Sabetto would pack two lunches and during the summer ride a streetcar to the East Cleveland station after work to catch the New York Central’s train 244, a local to Buffalo, New York, or No. 46, the Interstate Express. He would disembark in Painesville and spend the next few hours watching trains.

That included a the eastbound Fifth Avenue Special, Advance Commodore Vanderbilt, Southwestern Limited, New England States, Cleveland Limited, Ohio State Limited, Commodore Vanderbilt, and Twentieth Century Limited.

Eastbound trains included the South Shore Express, Empire State Express, and Pittsburgh-Cleveland Express.

Sabetto would then board Train 5, the Mohawk, back to East Cleveland and board another streetcar to go home. The cost for all of this was less than $3.

Another memory of how it used to be was recently shared by David Oroszi of Dayton.

Kodak has a film processing facility in Findlay, Ohio, and by its front door was a yellow mailbox.

Photographers who had purchased mailers could drop their slide film in that box and save on postage.

There was another benefit to dropping off film directly at the processing facility.

You not only saved on postage but greatly reduced the chance that your film would get lost in the mail.

“So many times we would go out of our way to drop off film right at the plant,” Oroszi wrote.

Kodak Marketing Executive Says Kodachrome Could be The Next Film to Make a Comeback

January 24, 2017

It almost sounds too good to be true, but there is hope that Kodak Alaris might bring back Kodachrome slide film.

kodachromeReports have surfaced on photography websites that Kodak is considering resurrecting what is, arguably, one of its most famous products.

In the wake of an announcement that Ektachrome would return to the market later this year, Kodak Chief Marketing Officer Steve Overman responded to questions about whether Kodachrome might be next.

“We get asked all the time by filmmakers and photographers alike, ‘are you gonna bring back some of these iconic film stocks like Kodachrome . . . , ” Overman said earlier this month during CES, a global consumer electronics and technology show. “I will say, we are investigating Kodachrome, looking at what it would take to bring that back . . . Ektachrome is a lot easier and faster to bring back to market . . . but people love Kodak’s heritage products and I feel, personally, that we have a responsibility to deliver on that love.”

Aside from Ektachrome, Kodak is also bringing back the Super 8 camera.

Some would argue quite strenuously that its rich colors made Kodachrome the best color film. Period.

But it was also a complex film to process and the cost of doing that was a major contributor to the film’s 2011 demise when the last lab in the country to process Kodachrome developed its last roll. Kodak had stopped manufacturing Kodachrome in 2009.

Aside from the fond memories of thousands — and  maybe millions — of photographers who used Kodachrome, there are some who still have rolls of Kodachrome film, some of it exposed but never processed, stashed away on shelves or in freezers.

If Kodachrome does make a comeback, look for a lot of film cameras to come out of the closet as the novelty factor kicks in.

Kodak Ektachrome Slide Film Making Comeback

January 7, 2017

Kodak Alaris said this week that it will bring back Kodak Ektachrome professional slide film in the fourth quarter of this year.

The color reversal film will be made for 135-36x camera formats and will have an ISO of 100.

More than likely, this will be the last roll of Kodak Ektachrome slide film that I will use.

Discontinued in 2012, Kodak Alaris said in a news release that Ektachrome was known for its extremely fine grain, clean colors, tones and contrasts.

The company noted that photographers for National Geographic magazine used Ektachrome film for several decades.

The company said there has been an increase in interest in analog photography, which has driven demand for film products.

The news release said sales of professional photographic films has risen in recent years because some photographers have been drawn to “the artistic control offered by manual processes and the creative satisfaction of a physical end product.”

The revived Ektachrome, like its discontinued counterpart, will use E6 processing. Kodak has never ceased making color negative film.

Concurrent with the reintroduction of Ektachrome slide film Kodak is bringing back Ektachrome Super 8 film.

Its Curtains for Kodak Ektachrome Slide Film

March 4, 2012

Shown is the last box of Ektachrome that Akron Railroad Club President Craig Sanders will ever likely buy. Indeed, he photographed it with the digital camera he purchased last July.

The dwindling band of railfan photographers who still capture images on slide film got some bad news last week. In a development that probably surprised no one,  Eastman Kodak announced that it will cease making all slide films, including its Ektachrome color reversal film

The move will end 77 years of manufacturing slide film for the iconic film company, which in January sought bankruptcy protection.

Kodak blamed “a steady decrease in sales and customer usage, combined with highly complex product formulation and manufacturing processes.” Kodak offers three types of Ektachrome: E100VS, E100G and Elite Chrome Extra Color 100.

In 2009 Kodak discontinued its popular Kodachrome slide film, which arguably was the most popular slide film among railroad photographers before the digital era began.

Kodak said the end of slide film production would not affect any other films that it makes, including color negative and black and white films.

Presumably, slide shooters will continue to be able to purchase Fuji slide film.