Posts Tagged ‘New York Central’

WMSR Acquires ex-NYC Dining Car

November 19, 2022

Tourist railroad Western Maryland Scenic has acquired a streamliner era dining car.

The former New York Central grill diner was part of the Chattanooga [Tennessee] Choo-Choo hotel complex for more than 50 years.

WMSR officials said they hope to have it begin serving meals on their railroad during Memorial Day weekend 2023.

The dining car is expected to supplement a cafe lounge car that railroad officials said is often overwhelmed by demand for food and beverages.

The ex-NYC car, No. 456, has a seating capacity of 42. It was built by Budd in 1948 and typically operated on such trains as the James Whitcomb Riley, New England States, Ohio State Limited, The Pacemaker, Southwestern Limited and Twilight Limited.

The car became surplus when the company operating the Chattanooga hotel began a redesign and renovation project that will relocate some cars elsewhere on the property.

Four cars are being relocated to the Tennessee Valley Railroad Museum and two others, including ex-NYC 456, are going elsewhere.

NYC Geep in the 1960s

November 18, 2022

It is 1967-1969 in either the late New York Central or early Penn Central era. I don’t remember this location, but it likely was between Cleveland and Painesville. NYC Geep 5790 sits beside what looks to be a freight house.

Photograph by Robert Farkas

NYC Geeps in Painesville

October 30, 2022

It’s been a while since the wayback machine has taken us back to the New York Central in Painesville. A pair of GP7s, Nos. 5740 and 5757 are in Painesville waiting their next assignment in February or March 1968. This was during the transition to the Penn Central era.

Photograph by Robert Farkas

CR&I Two for Tuesday

October 25, 2022

Here are two photos of New York Central No. 8407 (ex-Chicago River & Indiana) taken in a scrapyard in Cleveland.

The unit is a Lima-Hamilton 1,200 horsepower locomotive that was scrapped after the second photo was taken. The images were made on June 29, 1968, and July 22, 1973, respectively.

Photographs by Robert Farkas

Special Time in Cleveland Railroad History

October 13, 2022

Sometimes a scene captures a special time in history. It is Feb. 24 or 25, 1968, in Cleveland. The Penn Central era had begun less than a month (Feb. 1) prior to this photo.  New York Central No. 1049, an Alco FA-2, sits near the diesel shop at Collinwood Yard. In the far background are a few PC boxcars. Had these not been there, this would look like a NYC photo.

Article and Photograph by Robert Farkas

Mighty Oval Two for Tuesday

August 9, 2022

There is some interesting variety in these two images of an eastbound New York Central train caught east of Cleveland in 1967 or 1968. Here we see the train coming and going. John Woodworth was with me when I made this image.

Photographs by Robert Farkas

Wanna Go for a Ride?

June 17, 2022

It is 1967 or 1968 in what looks to be Painesville. New York Central E8A No. 4079 is on the point of this westbound passenger train. Care to take a ride?

Photograph by Robert Farkas

Owner to Renovate ex-NYC Depot in Delaware

May 9, 2022

A former New York Central station in Delaware, Ohio, is undergoing renovation after it was sold to a private company.

Riverwest purchased the depot from CSX in 2019 and has begun to develop it into a restaurant with retail space.

The firm said it would rehabilitate the exterior of the building in accordance with its historical character.

That includes replacement of the roof with new asphalt shingles that match the existing color and dimensions of the existing shingles.

Plans also include replacement of the wood windows and doors, masonry restoration of the east roof overhang, and restoration of the wood trim on the building.

The depot is currently vacant and has seen occasional retail use, including as a flower shop.

In 2018 it was placed on the list of Ohio’s most endangered historic sites.

The Way it Was: Low Cost Train Watching, Dropping Film at the Processing Plant

March 6, 2022

Some of you may remember having met Lou Sabetto in Berea in past years.

He photographed Cleveland railroad operations between the 1930s and 1980s before his death.

Although Sabetto had a vast photograph collection, it is thought to have been lost after he entered an assisted living facility due to heath issues.

Sheldon Lustig, another Berea regular, once commented that when he asked Sabetto how he was cataloging his collection, he pointed to his head and said “it’s all up here.”

Lustig recently related another story about Sabetto in an email distributed to subscribers of the Northern Ohio Association of Railway Societies email list.

Sabetto would pack two lunches and during the summer ride a streetcar to the East Cleveland station after work to catch the New York Central’s train 244, a local to Buffalo, New York, or No. 46, the Interstate Express. He would disembark in Painesville and spend the next few hours watching trains.

That included a the eastbound Fifth Avenue Special, Advance Commodore Vanderbilt, Southwestern Limited, New England States, Cleveland Limited, Ohio State Limited, Commodore Vanderbilt, and Twentieth Century Limited.

Eastbound trains included the South Shore Express, Empire State Express, and Pittsburgh-Cleveland Express.

Sabetto would then board Train 5, the Mohawk, back to East Cleveland and board another streetcar to go home. The cost for all of this was less than $3.

Another memory of how it used to be was recently shared by David Oroszi of Dayton.

Kodak has a film processing facility in Findlay, Ohio, and by its front door was a yellow mailbox.

Photographers who had purchased mailers could drop their slide film in that box and save on postage.

There was another benefit to dropping off film directly at the processing facility.

You not only saved on postage but greatly reduced the chance that your film would get lost in the mail.

“So many times we would go out of our way to drop off film right at the plant,” Oroszi wrote.

I’ve Grown to Like This Image

January 13, 2022

Back in 1967, I caught this lash-up in New York Central’s Collinwood Yard in Cleveland. Even a decade or so ago, I would not have posted this because part of the lead unit is behind a building.

Today, I really like this shot of NYC 1763, 3463, and 3372. There is so much to see including an F7A, F7B, and an ALCO FB-2. Then add in the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy covered hopper. 

As my wayback machine is in the shop, I don’t think I’ll be going back to reshoot this even if I could remember the exact day.

Article and Photograph by Robert Farkas