Posts Tagged ‘Northwest Ohio Intermodal Terminal’

CSX Plans Busy Capital Projects Year

January 10, 2022

CSX does not have any major capital projects in Ohio or neighboring states set for 2022, but will be busy with projects elsewhere the railroad’s chief engineer of bridges, design and construction told the National Railroad Construction and Maintenance Association Conference last week.

Those include rebuilding the Howard Street Tunnel in Baltimore; improving passenger rail routes in Virginia south of Washington; building the Forest Hill Flyover in Chicago; and building a new intermodal container yard in Chicago.

In the past year CSX completed expanding Avon Yard near Indianapolis by double-ending what had been a stub-end facility for intermodal operations.

CSX also completed a capital project at its intermodal facility near North Baltimore, Ohio, and completed work at other intermodal facilities across its network.

For more information about CSX capital plans for this year see https://www.trains.com/trn/news-reviews/news-wire/baltimore-virginia-chicago-projects-highlight-busy-csx-slate/

BNSF Linking Seattle and North Baltimore

June 10, 2020

BNSF has introduced domestic intermodal service between Seattle and the Northwest Ohio Intermodal Terminal in North Baltimore operated by CSX.

In a message sent this week to shippers, BNSF said the container-only service will be offered five days a week for eastbound and westbound freight originating and terminating in Seattle.

The notice said containers can be forwarded from North Baltimore to such points as Toledo, Columbus, Cleveland, Cincinnati, Detroit, Louisville, and Pittsburgh.

Eastbound moves are expected to take 163 hours and westbound moves 167 hours from cutoff to availability.

BNSF has a haulage rights agreement with CSX that began in October 2018 and initially included service between North Baltimore and Los Angeles.

Service to North Baltimore from Northern California was added in April 2019.

BNSF Adding More Service to North Baltimore Terminal

September 28, 2019

BNSF have increased the frequency of intermodal service operating between Los Angles and the CSX Northwest Ohio Intermodal Terminal at North Baltimore.

A Sunday morning departure from the Hobart terminal in Los Angeles has been added along with a Monday morning departure from North Baltimore.

The container trains operate on CSX under a haulage agreement. The service now runs six days a week.

The run through trains began in October 2018 with CSX crews handling the trains east of Chicago.

BNSF officials have indicated that they will likely begin serving additional West Coast terminals from North Baltimore as their domestic intermodal traffic grows.

The volume growth is being driven by increases in retail and e-commerce, particularly traffic bound for distribution centers.

CSX Putting New Intermodal Strategy Into Place

October 20, 2018

Earlier this year, CSX CEO James Foote said the railroad’s intermodal network was a mess and needed to be revamped.

Much of that revamping has involved the announcement of plans to end service in smaller intermodal service lanes in favor of higher-volume point-to-point markets.

But management had been vexed as to what to do with the Northwest Ohio Intermodal Terminal outside of North Baltimore, Ohio.

It opened in June 2011 as part of a hub and spoke strategy to build traffic in the lower-volume service lanes CSX is now abandoning.

The idea behind the hub and spoke concept was that volume could be built in low-volume markets by creating a connecting hub much like the passenger hubs that airlines operate in such cities as Atlanta and Chicago.

The concept is also used for air freight service provided by FedEx and UPS. North Baltimore was the connecting hub.

But once the hub and spoke strategy ended what would CSX do with the new North Baltimore terminal? Initially, the carrier talked about using North Baltimore to do block swapping.

Now, CSX sees the Northwest Ohio terminal as a gateway to Ohio Valley markets.

Rather than pick up containers by rail in such cities as Cleveland, Cincinnati and Columbus, CSX will instead load them aboard trains in North Baltimore after they have been driven there by truck.

CSX and BNSF recently announced a haulage agreement to build dedicated trains that will link North Baltimore and West Coast terminals by running through Chicago.

Also on the docket for North Baltimore is development of a 500-acre logistics park and the launch of service to East Coast ports.

In the recent third quarter earning conference call, CSX executives portrayed their strategy as one of reducing operational complexity while developing a smaller but more profitable intermodal network.

“We still have a long way to go to get that franchise right,” Foote said. “Part of the process is disassembling the old independent structure of the company. Because it’s not an independent company — it’s part and parcel of the railroad.”

By that he meant that previous management sought to provide service to as many terminals as possible and increase the volume of containers handled.

Foote said that resulted in an intermodal network that was inefficient and offered spotty service reliability due to its complex nature.

But perhaps more importantly, it came with high costs and low profit margins.

Overhauling intermodal operations is one of Foote’s areas of expertise, having done it at Canadian National where intermodal went from being CN’s least profitable endeavors to one of average profitability.

He believes the same transformation can be done at CSX, saying that more efficient and reliable service will lead to volume and revenue growth.

Foote said that during the third quarter CSX intermodal traffic was up 3 percent and intermodal revenue rose by 12 percent in comparison with the third quarter of 2017.

The reorganization of CSX’s intermodal strategy that began in fall 2017 has meant that in terms of market coverage, CSX has lost 14 percent of it.

It has dropped or will have dropped by late January 900 intermodal market pairs. It will continue to serve 500 market pairs, meaning it will have given up 44 percent of those pairings.

Most of those discontinued pairings were short-haul traffic and some never generated any traffic volume.

The BNSF haulage agreement is an example of how CSX is using the precision scheduled railroading model to reorganize its intermodal operations.

A key principle of the model is to minimize the number of times that a freight car is handled between origin and destination.

Foote said even after CSX abandoned the hub and spoke concept, it still found itself shuffling containers between trains twice or three times between origin and destination.

CSX officials said the railroad lost 7 percent of its intermodal volume when it ended the hub-and-spoke operation and it expects to lose another 7 percent by ending some of its low-volume markets.

The objective of the new intermodal model is to make up those losses through focus on potentially higher volume markets.

CSX-BNSF to Launch Ohio-LA Container Service

October 5, 2018

CSX and BNSF said this week they will begin a container service between Los Angeles and Ohio that will use the Northwest Ohio Intermodal Terminal in North Baltimore.

The service will begin on Oct. 29 and originate trains five days a week in each direction.

On BNSF, the containers will move via the Southern Transcon route west of Chicago.

“Customers who take advantage of this new service can reach key markets within the fast-growing Ohio Valley region,” said BNSF Group Vice President Consumer Products Tom Williams in a statement. “Our new Ohio intermodal service will create an efficient, direct service from the West Coast.”

CSX said it will work with NorthPoint Development to construct a 500-acre logistics park adjacent to North Baltimore facility and is expanding eastern access to the facility through new service to and from the Port of New York and New Jersey.

This will involve international traffic that will be trucked from North Baltimore to destinations in southern Michigan, western Ohio, and Indiana.

The logistics park will include traditional warehousing and distribution capabilities, as well as services such as a container yard and equipment storage, export container stuffing, and transload and break-bulk resources, all within a heavy-haul local corridor.

The North Baltimore facility was opened in June 2011. At the time, CSX operated it on a hub and spoke model in which containers from various locations throughout the CSX network were routed there to be interchanged.

The hub and spoke approach was intended to help build traffic density in low-density intermodal markets.

That model was dropped last year when CSX ended the hub and spoke intermodal operating model. At the time, CSX officials said sorting containers in North Baltimore added transit time to traffic that is price- and service-sensitive.

Instead, CSX said it would focus on point-to-point intermodal service in high-volume markets.

The BNSF-CSX agreement means that containers will no longer be trucked across Chicago but instead will move through the city by rail.

Intermodal analyst Larry Gross told Trains magazine that BNSF is trading the cost of trucking containers in Chicago for extended drayage from North Baltimore to destinations that include Detroit, Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati and Louisville.

Gross said there is not much drayage capacity at present in North Baltimore, which means the new service is likely initially to appeal to national trucking companies such as J.B. Hunt and Schneider National, which have their own drivers.

“It’s not like drayage capacity will magically appear,” Gross said, but added that he expects local drayage capacity to develop as intermodal volume increases in North Baltimore.

The logistics park CSX plans to develop in North Baltimore will offer opportunities for backhaul moves of agricultural products to Asia.

The park will be similar to logistics parks that BNSF has near its intermodal facilities in Joliet, Illinois; Oklahoma City; Kansas City; and Alliance, Texas.

In the short term, CSX said the number of trains serving the North Baltimore facility won’t change, but is expected to grow over time.

The service that starts on Oct. 29 will use existing intermodal trains that BNSF and CSX interchange in Chicago.

CSX Revamping Intermodal Service

August 16, 2018

The plans of CSX to revamp its intermodal business will focus on more profitable longer-haul service linking major markets.

Trains magazine reported on Wednesday that CSX has notified its customers that numerous changes are being made to traffic that is interchanged with BNSF as well as the pending end of 75 low-volume service lanes.

A similar change in interline service with Union Pacific had been announced about a week ago.

CSX said that the changes are designed to reduce transit time through Chicago.

The new operating plan will funnel interchange traffic coming through Chicago to five eastern destinations including Chambersburg, Pennsylvania; North Kearny, New Jersey; the Northwest Ohio Intermodal Terminal in North Baltimore, Ohio; Springfield, Massachusetts; and Syracuse, New York.

Intermodal traffic will be sent to those terminals by truck from markets now served by rail. For example, traffic going to and from Cincinnati, Cleveland, Columbus and Detroit will travel by highway to and from North Baltimore.

Baltimore will be served via Chambersburg; Philadelphia via North Kearny; Worcester, Massachusetts, via Springfield; and Buffalo, New York via Syracuse.
CSX said the changes will cut travel time, including by as much as a day between West Coast terminals and New England.

The changes will occur in mid-September with UP interchange and in mid to late September for BNSF interchange.

BNSF and CSX also will shift interchange traffic bound for the Southeast from Chicago to Memphis. This includes traffic headed for Atlanta, Florida, and Charlotte, North Carolina.

“We have been working closely with our interline partners, Union Pacific and BNSF, to streamline interchanges, especially for traffic routed through Chicago and the Southeast,” CSX Chief Marketing Officer Mark Wallace wrote in a letter to intermodal customers. “These changes, to take effect prior to peak season, will enable us to execute our service plan with greater reliability and speed during this important shipping period.”

Union Pacific had told its shippers in early August of the plans of CSX to end steel-wheel Chicago interchange between a number of UP origins and CSX destinations as well as to shift interchange away from Chicago and New Orleans in favor of Memphis.

Most of the 197 UMAX service lanes being discontinued are low volume, including 67 that have not had any container movements in the past 12 months. Other lanes being dropped averaged just one container per week.

“Maintaining these status-quo service offerings would be detrimental to the majority of our customers and the East-West transcontinental network, particularly during fall peak,” Wallace said in his letter tocustomers.

CSX contends that most of the UMAX volume in cancelled steel-wheel interchange lanes can continue via crosstown trucks linking UP and CSX terminals.

However, Trains quoted an intermodal analyst as saying that might not happen because drayage capacity is tight in Chicago and it will increase the cost of the move. The analyst said drayage by highway will increase the travel time.

Movements from the West Coast to the Ohio Valley are likely to stay on the road once they are unloaded in Chicago.

In some instances, the traffic might be diverted to Norfolk Southern in Chicago. Of the UMAX lanes being dropped, 49 could potentially shift to NS.

CSX CEO James Foote had indicated during an earnings call conversation last month that the carrier was studying revamping its intermodal network. He said at the time that during his days at Canadian National that that carrier had undertaken a similar intermodal restructuring.

During his comments last month Foote said CSX would seek to become more efficient.

In his letter to shippers, Wallace said CSX will not be making any other changes to its intermodal network until the peak season is over.

The intermodal restructuring will not result in any closing of terminals.

Most RRs Have Gained Traffic, But Not CSX

July 7, 2018

Five of the six Class 1 railroads in the United States have reported traffic gains in the first half of the year. The lone exception is CSX, which said its traffic is down 0.6 percent due to a decline in carload volume and the effect of intermodal service changes.

CSX last year jettisoned 7 percent of its intermodal volume by ending its hub-and-spoke intermodal network, which had its hub at the Northwest Ohio Intermodal Terminal in North  Baltimore.

The hub and spoke approach sought to build volume at low-volume origins and destinations. Nonetheless, CSX said its intermodal volume was up 1.5 percent for the first half of this year.

The traffic figures are reported by the railroads to the Association of American Railroads. BNSF was the biggest gainer, seeing traffic rise 5 percent.

Norfolk Southern led all carriers in intermodal traffic with an 8.2 percent gain for the first quarter and 7.9 percent for the first half of the year.

In the second quarter, NS led the industry in overall growth at 5.9 percent, edging out Canadian National’s 5.7 percent volume growth.

Some railroad industry observers said railroads have benefited from tight capacity in the trucking industry. Most of the gains in traffic posted by the railroads has been in intermodal.

Carload growth was strong in the second quarter, rising by 4.2 percent. It had been just 0.3 percent in the first quarter of this year.

CSX May Sell or Lease New Castle Sub

January 23, 2018

CSX may seek to sell or lease its New Castle Subdivision that operates through Akron, Youngstown and Kent.

Trains magazine reported on Monday that the line is among 8,000 miles that CSX is reviewing, although not all of the route miles are expected to be sold or leased.

In its report, Trains said CSX is eyeing sale or lease of the former Baltimore & Ohio mainline between Baltimore and Greenwich, Ohio. If that is the case, CSX would no longer be serving Pittsburgh.

Also reported to be under scrutiny are the Northwest Ohio Intermodal Terminal and unidentified branch lines in Ohio.

One of the latter could be the former Cleveland, Lorain & Wheeling subdivision that operates between Cleveland and Lorain, and the New Castle Sub at Sterling.

The intermodal terminal at North Baltimore became an underused facility last year when CSX closed it. It might be attractive to a western railroad.

Trains said that the review encompasses more than a third of the railroad’s 21,000-mile network and is being motivated for a desire to cut costs to boost profitability.

CSX would be able to reduce labor and maintenance costs by shedding thousands of miles of track.

The railroad had signaled last year that it was going to review all of its assets.

“Everything we’ve got out there is going to go through some scrutiny. If it creates shareholder value to sell it, we’re going to sell it,” the late E. Hunter Harrison said at a conference last November. “If it creates shareholder value to keep it, we’re going to keep it.”

Other CSX routes that Trains reported as being under review are:

  • The former Boston & Albany main and associated branch lines in Massachusetts.
  • The former Louisville & Nashville between Cincinnati and Atlanta.
  • Most of the former B&O between Cincinnati and East St. Louis, Illinois.
  • Former Pere Marquette trackage in Michigan.
  • CSX routes to Canada and related U.S. trackage.
  • The Appalachian coal network, including portions of the former Clinchfield.
  • Large sections of the Florence Division in the Carolinas.
  • The Dothan sub in Alabama and Georgia.
  • The Auburndale sub in Florida.
  • Branches and redundant trackage in Alabama, Connecticut, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, and New York.

The first four subdivisions were put out to bid last week. They included the Decatur and Danville subdivisions in Illinois, and the Tallahassee and PA Subdivisions in Florida.

Trains said CSX is expected to put a handful of subdivisions up for sale or lease every few weeks.

CSX acknowledged in a statement that it was reviewing its network and operations, but gave few details about which routes are under scrutiny.

The review process has attracted the attention of short line and regional railroads as well as private equity investment firms.

Among those reported to be expressing interest have been Genesee & Wyoming, Watco, OmniTRAX, and RJ Corman.

Before Harrison arrived at CSX last spring, the carrier had announced a program known as CSX of Tomorrow that concentrated capital spending on a triangle of routes extending from Chicago to Florida to New Jersey and back to Chicago.

Also given priority were routes to New England, St. Louis and Baltimore with the latter including the former B&O mainline via Cumberland, Maryland.

That 9,200-mile network handles 84 percent of CSX train miles and produces two-thirds of its originating and terminating traffic.

However, CSX at the time said that other routes would continue to be maintained, albeit at a lower level of maintenance and speed.

Those routes originated a third of CSX traffic and then-CSX CEO Michael Ward was reluctant to give them up through sale, lease or abandonment.

Under the latest management review, CSX appears to believe that it will continue to handle most of the traffic originating or terminating on the lines it is seeking to dispose of, only without having to pay for them.

Is CSX Trying to Eat its Seed Corn?

November 6, 2017

Under normal circumstances, I don’t cover news beyond the states that surround Ohio, but there is a story out of Baltimore that is worth following because it may say much about what is going on with CSX these days.

Last week CSX said it would not contribute $145 million to a public-private partnership to enlarge the Howard Street Tunnel in Baltimore to accommodate double-stacked container trains.

When the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad built the tunnel 122 years ago, no one could have envisioned stack trains, let alone intermodal trains carrying containers and truck trailers.

Howard Street is just one example of the aging infrastructure in the Northeast transportation corridor between New York and Washington that needs to upgraded, rebuilt or replaced. It won’t be inexpensive.

You might think that CSX would be keen on modernizing the Howard Street Tunnel because it is an impediment to developing the I-95 corridor between New Jersey and Florida. And for a time it was.

Enlarging the Howard Street Tunnel would have benefited the Helen Delich Bentley Port of Baltimore, which has seen an increase in container traffic since the expansion of the Panama Canal.

Figures provided by the Maryland Port Administration show that the port handled a record 10.3 million tons of general freight and nearly 908,000 TEUs (20-foot-equivalent units) of containers in fiscal year 2017, which ended on June 30.

Then along came E. Hunter Harrison of precision scheduled railroading fame.

In announcing the decision to cancel its share of funding for enlarging Howard Street Tunnel, CSX put out a statement that referenced precision scheduled railroading – it has become a buzz phrase used as boilerplate in virtually every CSX statement and news release these days – and made a vague statement that the tunnel project “no longer justifies the level of investment required from CSX and our public partners at this time.”

But as Railway Age magazine pointed out, the statement did not fully explain why CSX decided to bail out on funding the Howard Street project.

When the magazine asked CSX to elaborate, its PR department replied with the same statement it had issued earlier. CSX is not going to explain itself any further.

Railway Age suggested two possible reasons for why CSX backed away from the Howard Street tunnel project.

One is that a fresh set of eyes in CSX management decided that the return on investment wasn’t worth $145 million because the volume of double-stack container traffic likely to use the tunnel would not be as high as the previous CSX management projected.

The other theory is that CSX management is dancing to the tune being played by hedge fund Mantle Ridge, which played a major role in getting Harrison installed as CEO last spring.

This theory is that CSX is diverting cash from infrastructure projects to a $1.5 billion stock buy-back program that will benefit Mantle Ridge, which acquired a sizable block of CSX stock in order to have enough clout to force the company to hire Harrison.

Media outlets have also been reporting that CSX has decided against building a new $270 million intermodal terminal near Rocky Mount, North Carolina.

Designed to develop intermodal business in the middle Atlantic region, the Carolina Connector was to be modeled after the Northwest Ohio Intermodal Terminal in North Baltimore, Ohio, which opened in 2010.

CSX has begun scaling back operations in North Baltimore and there are reports that it plans to end intermodal operations there on Nov. 11. Last year, North Baltimore handled nearly 30 percent of CSX’s intermodal traffic.

It is not clear yet what strategy CSX has in mind for its intermodal business other than it is abandoning the hub and spoke system of building traffic density at terminals such as North Baltimore and the proposed North Carolina facility.

Railway Age quoted railroad economist Jim Blaze as saying that without enlarging the Howard Street Tunnel, most of the talk about developing the I-95 corridor and diverting traffic from trucks is just talk.

“Stack trains are about 35 percent more efficient than single-level intermodal trains,” Blaze told Railway Age. “Without Baltimore as a double-stack route, other intermodal I-95 projects on CSX’s two-decade-long wish list are likely also now at risk. My questions: Where’s the traffic growth to come from for intermodal east of the Appalachian Mountains? What’s the back-up plan to grow the top line of the CSX income statement? This is a strategic economic issue.”

Blaze predicted that the “winners” of the CSX decision will be truckers as well as Norfolk Southern, which has been working for two decades to develop a double-stack route between the New York City/Northern New Jersey region and Florida.

The NS route is longer and more circuitous than the CSX route, but has clearance to handle stack trains all the way.

If the Mantle Ridge influence theory is true, it suggests that CSX is playing a game that has been played out many times before in corporate America.

In the 19th century, it was common for financiers to “milk” railroads for all the money they could before walking away and leaving the railroad a shadow of its former self.

That might not happen to CSX, but I also wonder if this is replay of another era not that long ago that was described in Rush Loving’s book, The Men Who Loved Trains.

That book described another CSX administration that was focused on expense control of its income statement and balance sheet assets to the detriment of infrastructure development.

It decided that short-term financial gain could be had by squeezing a little more life out of ancient signals and other infrastructure.

In this case, CSX has decided it can get by a little longer with a narrow tunnel in a key intermodal lane.

Rather than spending money to make money, CSX has decided to hoard and eat its seed corn.

CSX Still Eying North Baltimore Hub Expansion

November 8, 2013

A wide-span crane shuffles containers at the CSX North Baltimore intermodal hub in June 2011. (Photograph by Craig Sanders)

A wide-span crane shuffles containers at the CSX North Baltimore intermodal hub in June 2011. (Photograph by Craig Sanders)

CSX is still considering expanding its intermodal hub in North Baltimore, Ohio, despite having been turned down earlier this year for a federal grant that would have helped underwrite the expansion.

The news emerged during a visit this week to the facility by Vice President Joe Biden and Secretary of Transportation Anthony Foxx.

Rusty Orben, CSX’s director of public affairs, had said last May that without a grant picking up half the cost of the North Baltimore expansion, it wouldn’t be built.  But Carla Groleau, a CSX spokeswoman, said this week that the railroad is “still considering our options” for expanding the North Baltimore facility.

The North Baltimore facility currently handles about 2,000 containers per day and originates, terminates, or swaps blocks on about 30 scheduled trains.

The CSX application for TIGER funding that would have covered half of the expansion project’s $42 million cost did not make the U.S. Department of Transportation’s list of new grants announced in September. CSX began operating full-cube double-stacked trains between North Baltimore and Chambersburg, Pa., this past summer.

The North Baltimore facility, formally known as the Northwest Ohio Intermodal Terminal, is part of the railroad’s National Gateway.

The next major project in developing the National Gateway will be enlarging the Virginia Avenue Tunnel in Washington to allow doublestacks to travel between CSX’s former Baltimore & Ohio and Richmond, Fredericksburg & Potomac main lines. That project is in planning and environmental review.

The importance of intermodal traffic to CSX was underscored by the company’s Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer Fredrik Eliasson in a presentation at the Baird Industrials Conference in Chicago this week.

Eliasson called intermodal, “a key driver of growth” that now represents 40 percent of CSX’s overall volume and is expected to increase further, reflecting “the attractive economic value of converting freight from highway to rail.”

Eliasson said there is sustained growth in CSX’s merchandise and intermodal businesses, which now comprises more than 80 percent of the company’s volume. CSX expects that business to continue growing at a rate above the general economy, he said.

“CSX employs a dual intermodal strategy that includes both high-density corridors and a hub-and-spoke philosophy that also creates service density to open new small and medium-sized markets—a strategy the company believes is a differentiator in the intermodal marketplace,” Eliasson said.

CSX recently completed the first phase of doublestack clearances in its National Gateway initiative, which is an effort to create an efficient rail route between Mid-Atlantic ports and Midwestern markets.

When the National Gateway is complete in 2015, roughly 95 percent of the railroad’s intermodal traffic will be moving in doublestack lanes.

CSX is building new terminals to expand its reach in markets such as central Florida, Pittsburgh, and Montreal.

It continues to invest in existing terminals to further increase efficiency throughout its network, such as an expansion of its Northwest Ohio hub, which opened in 2011 and has helped alleviate congestion in Chicago while opening up connectivity to markets in the Midwest.

During his visit to North Baltimore this past week, Vice President Biden noted the imminent enlargement of the Panama Canal will double the potential capacity of container ships using that waterway.

Biden described the National Gateway as “the inland version of widening the Panama Canal.”

Although CSX used no public funds to develop its $175 million, 500-acre Northwest Ohio Intermodal Terminal, which opened in 2011, $98 million of CSX’s $193 million cost for bridge and tunnel clearance work in eastern Ohio, Pennsylvania, Maryland, and West Virginia to link it with a new terminal at Chambersburg, Pa., came from a federal Transportation Improvements Generating Economic Recovery Act grant.

“Without TIGER, there would be no National Gateway,” Biden said, because without the higher bridges and taller tunnels, CSX would not be able to realize the full benefit of double-stack trains to the North Baltimore terminal.

Biden spoke after briefly touring the North Baltimore terminal, including a visit to its training simulator for crane operators and conversations with Oscar Munoz, CSX’s chief operating officer, and Widby Whitt, president of CSX Intermodal Terminals.

The Northwest Ohio Intermodal Terminal opened in 2011 and CSX says that it employs 300 full-time workers. It is located on 500 acres in Wood County, Ohio, a mile west of North Baltimore.