Posts Tagged ‘NS trains’

Touch of the UP on NS in Bellevue

July 1, 2017

Union Pacific No. 6247 is the last locomotive in a light power move to Bellevue. The signal at right is for a Wheeling & Lake Erie train.

A trio of Union Pacific units trail as a train gets underway headed for the Fostoria District.

Trailing in the motive power consist of train 175 as it passes the old reservoir at Caroline.

Helping to pull train 60U south of Attica.

During the longest day outing of the Akron Railroad Club last Sunday in Bellevue, Union Pacific motive power showed up on at least four trains, albeit trailing in all instances.

A UP unit was the last unit on a light power move, which meant that it was facing outward as it rolled through the mini-plant. So the photograph gives it the appearance of leading even if it isn’t.

Still, it is nice to see something colorful and foreign when going trackside.

But is He a Railfan?

June 27, 2017

Marty Surdyk, Todd Vander Sluis and I were out chasing Norfolk Southern trains on the Sandusky District south of Bellevue on Sunday during the Akron Railroad Club’s annual longest day outing.

CSX was single tracking in the vicinity of Attica Junction and had trains backing up. Norfolk Southern ended up paying the price.

The 29G, though, got lucky. The CSX dispatcher agreed to let it across between CSX traffic without much delay, but NS train 175 on the other side of the crossing would have to wait at West Attica.

We elected to chase the 29G and catch it somewhere north of Attic Junction. That turned out to be at a crossing along a township road where there was a home next to the tracks.

The homeowner was out mowing the grass. The guy has a great view of NS operations here, but I wonder, is he a railfan? He hardly looked up as the 29G came past. It was just another train.

Check Another One Off the List

June 5, 2017

For some time I’ve been wanting to make a photograph of a Norfolk Southern train passing the Willoughby Coal & Supply building on the north edge of downtown Willoughby.

I’ve seen a number of images made here and it seems like nearly every railroad photographer in Northeast Ohio has photographed the scene except me.

The building is a red brick structure that is said to be haunted. On the day that I made the image shown above a school group from the Orange schools was making a field trip here for a ghost walk.

The building is listed among the top 10 in the book America’s Most Haunted and described listed in Haunted Willoughby, Ohio by Cathi Weber.

The structure was built in 1893 as a flour mill and the haunted tale stems from the 1947 mysterious death of its owner.

The building has housed a number of businesses over the years with the current owner selling to the sewer and masonry industry since 1955.

Photographing here is pretty straight forward. The scene works best with an eastbound train in the morning and you stand on the south side of the tracks on the sidewalk for Erie Street.

Shown is NS train 316, a Bellevue to Buffalo manifest freight that on this particular day was led by a Canadian Pacific unit.

Some Quality Time on Horseshoe Curve

June 2, 2017

 

In this second installment of the trip that Akron Railroad Club member Ed Ribinskas took to Pennsylvania last month, we join him at Horseshoe Curve on the Pittsburgh Line of Norfolk Southern.

Ed was there along with his brother in law Karl and his son Owen. They made a day trip to the curve and the Everett Railroad.

While on the curve, Ed photographed Amtrak westbound train No. 43, the Pennsylvanian. It had its standard Amfleet consist pulled by a single P42DC locomotive.

No. 43 passed on the curve an NS manifest freight had had the Savannah & Atlanta heritage unit (No. 1065) in the motive power consist.

Photographs by Edward Ribinskas

EOT at End of the Day

March 17, 2017

It was already starting to get dark when I arrived in Olmsted Falls. It has been an unusually warm January day and traffic on the Chicago Line of Norfolk Southern was unusually heavy. Almost all of it was going westbound.

What had brought me there was the promise of seeing the Lehigh Valley heritage unit. I had seen it just once before, back in 2012, in Olmsted Falls. But it had been trailing.

I got the LV H unit and waited for the train to pass. There was some sunset color to the west so I decided to see what I could do with it.

To my surprise and delight, I caught the blinking red light of the EOT just at the right time.

It created a starburst effect that provided a nice contrast with the shadows of the train against the last light of day.

Article and Photograph by Craig Sanders

Crossing the Beaver River

February 23, 2017

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The Fort Wayne Line of Norfolk Southern crosses the Beaver River in Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania.

For those unfamiliar with the area, this is north of Conway Yard near Pittsburgh and even north of Rochester, Pennsylvania.

For those who may be wondering what motive power was pulling this westbound intermodal train, if you regularly follow this blog  you’ve seen it already.

It was the Pennsylvania Railroad heritage unit. Now here is the rest of the train crossing the river.

Photographs by Craig Sanders

NS Bridges of Oak Harbor

February 7, 2017

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One in a periodic series of images that I made last summer

The Toledo District of Norfolk Southern in Oak Harbor has two bridges that make for good photo props.

One bridge carries the tracks over the NS Chicago Line on the west side of town while the other carries the Toledo District over the Portage River.

In the top and middle photograph above, a westbound NS tanker train cruises westbound on the Chicago Line and ducks beneath the Toledo District.

I don’t know the age of that plate girder bridge but it might have been installed by the original Wheeling & Lake Erie. The modern day NS Toledo District was back in the day the W&LE’s mainline to Toledo.

A lot of trains of the New York Central, Penn Central, Conrail and now NS have passed beneath that bridge.

The modern W&LE has trackage rights on the NS Toledo District so you can still see Wheeling trains on the bridge.

The bottom photograph shows an NS train crossing the bridge over the Portage River in a view that was made from the Oak Harbor cemetery.

Article and Photographs by Craig Sanders

Finding Open Views of the NS Chicago Line

November 18, 2016
A eastbound Norfolk Southern intermodal train crosses Carroll-Erie Road east of Oak Harbor.

A eastbound Norfolk Southern intermodal train crosses Carroll-Erie Road east of Oak Harbor.

One in a periodic series of images I made last summer

Photographers in the western United States seldom have to look far for an open view unless they are in dense mountainous terrain.

There are times when I envy them when searching for open views of railroads here in Ohio.

Northeast Ohio has some rolling hills, but it also has a lot of trees, which makes finding open views a major challenge.

So imagine the feeling of satisfaction we felt upon finding an open field next to the Chicago Line of Norfolk near Oak Harbor.

It was a July afternoon and we had been exploring the Chicago Line for most of the day.

The open area was adjacent to North Carroll-Erie Road. There was a soybean field next to the tracks and the road, but the plants were not so high that they blocked the view.

We had to wait awhile before we got a train and by the time we left we had seen intermodal trains in each direction.

As I had done at an earlier stop not far from here, I sought to emphasize the country feel of the environment by shooting down the road and across the soybean field.

It still didn’t have the same feel as, say, western Ohio or even Indiana or Illinois. But it still felt like the rural Midwest even if it was just a mile or two from the Lake Erie shore.

Article and Photographs by Craig Sanders

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Sunday Afternoon at the Garfield Sag

October 12, 2016
The money shot of the day was the westbound 25T coming out of the Garfield sag. A portion of the rear of auto rack train 18N is visible in the distance.

The money shot of the day was the westbound 25T coming out of the Garfield sag. A portion of the rear of auto rack train 18N is visible in the distance.

Marty Surdyk and I were discussing Akron Railroad Club matters by phone on a Saturday evening when I mentioned that I wanted to go east of Alliance on Sunday and photograph at the Garfield sag.

Did he want to meet me in Sebring? He didn’t say yes, but didn’t say no, only to keep my cell phone on.

We exchange a few text messages on Sunday morning and he said he would be coming after he finished some errands.

By the time Marty got to Sebring it was nearly 1 p.m. and I was just finishing the tuna salad wrap I had gotten at Sheetz.

We chatted a bit with fellow ARRC member Dennis Sautter who was on his way to a meeting of the Sebring Model Railroad club, which is based in the former Pennsylvania Railroad depot in Sebring.

Then it was time to head for the sag. I’ve only been there once and it was back in the days when I was still using slide film. I was with ARRC member Roger Durfee and we stood on the rear of his Jeep to get a little more elevation.

I caught just one train, which made a nice photo, yet it was a little soft. I’ve wanted to get back to the sag ever since but wasn’t sure I could find it.

Marty pulled into an access road on the north side of the crossing of the Fort Wayne Line of Norfolk Southern and Ellett road and we waited for what seemed like an hour before a train appeared. Although named for the hamlet of Garfield and the sag is located just east of Beloit.

A westbound manifest freight showed up about 2:30 p.m. We didn’t catch its symbol, but by the time the head end reached our position at Ellett Road, the sun was behind a cloud.

We didn’t have to wait long for the next train, the eastbound 18N, an auto rack train that would be involved in a three-train meet at CP Murph.

The Cleveland Line dispatcher told the 18N it would be stopping at Murph to allow the 24M to run around it.

The dispatcher later told the westbound 25T that it would be waiting at Murph for the 24M, a hot intermodal train that carries UPS trailers.

Although the feature attraction where we were hanging out was the Garfield sag, the crossing of Ellett Road is at the top of crown that features sloping terrain in both directions. Hence the images we made of the 18N and 24M show those trains it climbing a grade out of Beloit.

The Garfield sag, though, is impressive for how with a good telephoto lens you can see the train descending and ascending.

The rear of the 18N was stopped just beyond Smith Goshen Road, the next crossing east of Ellett Road.

The 24M was not long so I was able to get the entirety of it in the sag with its head end passing the rear end of the 18N.

We elected to remain at Ellett Road and wait for the 25T. It, too, was a short train and I got all of it in the sag and all of it in sunlight.

With the three-train meet concluded, we headed to Salem. The NS executive train was coming and we would get it at Salem because the lighting would be better there.

Article and Photographs by Craig Sanders

The stretch version of the 25T approaching Ellett road. Notice that the rear of the 18N is now out of sight.

The stretch version of the 25T approaching Ellett road. Notice that the rear of the 18N is now out of sight.

The sun decided to hide behind a cloud just as the motive power of the first train we saw reached Ellett Road.

The sun decided to hide behind a cloud just as the motive power of the first train we saw reached Ellett Road.

The rear end of the 18N is covered in shadows, but the rest of the train is in the bright afternoon sunlight.

The rear end of the 18N is covered in shadows, but the rest of the train is in the bright afternoon sunlight.

The head end of the 24M is about to overtake the rear of the 18H. The profile of the 24M sh ows that it has containers and UPS trailers.

The head end of the 24M is about to overtake the rear of the 18H. The profile of the 24M sh ows that it has containers and UPS trailers.

The head end and the rear end of the 24M both fit into this view.

The head end and the rear end of the 24M both fit into this view.

Here comes the 24M. Two trains were stopped to await its passage.

Here comes the 24M. Two trains were stopped to await its passage.

The 18N climbs the grade leading up to Ellett Road just east of Beloit.

The 18N climbs the grade leading up to Ellett Road just east of Beloit.

The rear of the 18N is just beyond Smith Gosen Road. The grain silos above the train are located in Garfield.

The rear of the 18N is just beyond Smith Gosen Road. The grain silos above the train are located in Garfield.

The visual drama of trains traversing the Garfield sag is not as pronounced when photographing them with a wide angle lens.

The visual drama of trains traversing the Garfield sag is not as pronounced when photographing them with a wide angle lens.

Colorful NS Motive Power Duo

September 15, 2016

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It wasn’t an all heritage locomotives consist, but Norfolk Southern train 64T had an unusual motive power consist when it passed through Northeast Ohio during the morning hours of Monday, Sept. 12.

Leading the train was the Erie Railroad heritage locomotive while the tailing unit was the DC to AC conversion No. 4000.

The same duo had led the train or tank cars westbound through the region last Saturday, but that was during early morning hours and NS 4000 had been leading.

Reports on HeritageUnits.com indicated that on Monday the 64T was reported at Alliance at 11:06 a.m.

No reports were made for the time that train passed through Cleveland.

Rich Thompson was able to get to Hines Hill Road near Macedonia to capture the 64T as it made its way east on the NS Cleveland Line.

Photographs by Richard Thompson