Posts Tagged ‘Painesville trestle’

NS Painesville Bridge to Open late Summer 2018

November 17, 2017

The new Norfolk Southern bridge over the Grand River in Painesville is expected to open in late summer 2018.

An NS spokesman told the News-Herald of Willoughby that when completed the single-track bridge will be 1,318 feet in length and supported by seven concrete support structures.

The existing bridge, which was built in 1905 by the Nickel Plate Road, has 14 support structures. That bridge was strengthened in the 1940s, but NS has decided it needs to be replaced.

Designed by HDR Engineering of Cincinnati, the bridge is being constructed by Great Lakes Construction of Hinckley.

Work began last March and trains on the NS line between Cleveland and Buffalo, New York, have continued to use the existing bridge, which sees 10 to 15 trains a day.

“Work crews now are constructing the foundations and concrete towers that will support the bridge,” said NS spokesman Jon Glass. “The bridge foundations are being drilled down to bedrock, a distance that ranges from 30 to 100 feet below ground surface.”

The foundations will have steel-reinforced concrete and the steel bridge spans that carry the track will be outfitted with a precast concrete deck. Crossties, rail, and ballast will be laid atop the concrete deck.

Glass said the new bridge will be less costly to maintain and have less of a footprint in the Grand River, thereby improving the flow of the river in that location.

NS has not disclosed how much the bridge will cost.

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Erie Heritage Unit Leads 22K

July 16, 2017

I saw on Saturday morning that Erie 1068 was on 22K. I had things to do and got home about 2 p.m. and, luckily,  it wasn’t by yet. I got it at 3:20 p.m. at the Painesville trestle. Each week it will be a different view with all the construction of the new bridge underway.

Photographs by Edward Ribinskas

Working on the New Painesville Trestle

May 24, 2017

Preparation work has begun for construction of a new bridge to carry the Lake Erie District of Norfolk Southern over the Grand River in Painesville.

During a recent visit, construction workers were working below the current trestle and at track level on both sides of the bridge preparing the site.

It appears that the new bridge will be built just south of the existing structure.

Railfans watching the work and waiting for a train said that the NS police have been patrolling  the area and making sure that “visitors” don’t get on the property.

The project is expected to take two years to complete. Shown is westbound intermodal train train 23K.

NS May be Planning New Painesville Bridge

March 31, 2017

Norfolk Southern train No. 206 rattles the trestle over the Grand River in Painesville in 2014.

Norfolk Southern appears to be taking steps that might result in the building of a new bridge over the Grand River in Painesville.

Akron Railroad Club member Ed Ribinskas reports that in recent weeks crews have been out putting in small flags and markers that point toward building a new bridge south of the existing single-track trestle.

Crews have also been removing trees and brush on both banks of the river valley.

Known as a steel stringer bridge, the current trestle was built by the Nickel Plate Road and is now part of the NS Lake Erie District.

Ed said that based on the location of the flags in the ground, the single track would bend a little southward to cross the new bridge.

NKP H Unit on the Original Nickel Plate

August 27, 2016

The Nickel Plate Road heritage locomotive of Norfolk Southern crosses the trestle in Painesville over the Grand River on Aug. 19.

In a modest way this has been my summer to chase Norfolk Southern heritage units.

In the past month, I’ve photographed the Conrail and Nickel Plate Road H units, both on the original rails of the railroad that they celebrate.

Shown above is NS 8100, the NKP heritage unit on original Nickel Plate rails as it crosses the Grand River in Painesville.

I still am searching for many more, including the Erie, New York Central and original Norfolk Southern. So I have a long ways to go to reach all 20.

Photograph by Peter Bowler

My Only Snow Shot of the Season Was the Erie Heritage Locomotive on Painesville Trestle

April 12, 2016

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On Sunday after I got home from church I checked HeritageUnits.com and saw that Norfolk Southern 1068 — the Erie heritage unit — was on the 22K.

Here are my shots at 11:20 a.m. at the Painesville trestle. Actually, these are my only snow shots this season. Also, the trestle is much more visible at this time as compared to mid-summer like when Nickel Plate Road 765 came through last July.

Article and Photographs by Edward Ribinskas

The 765 National Parks Tour Ferry Move

September 13, 2015
Nickel Plate Road No. 765 crosses the trestle over Conneaut Creek and the Bessemer & Lake Erie Railroad. Just 20 minutes earlier, a light power move on the ex-B&LE had cruised into Conneaut. If only it had been later or the 765 had been earlier.

Nickel Plate Road No. 765 crosses the trestle over Conneaut Creek and the Bessemer & Lake Erie Railroad. Just 20 minutes earlier, a light power move on the ex-B&LE had cruised into Conneaut. If only it had been later or the 765 had been earlier.

Dawn came near the Ohio-Pennsylvania border as we motored eastward on Interstate 90 in search of steam.

Nickel Plate Road No. 765 would be making a 250-mile jaunt over its ancestral route from Buffalo, New York, to Bellevue as part of the third leg of a ferry move from Steamtown National Historic Site to the Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad.

No one suggested it out loud, but it could have been dubbed the National Parks tour because the 765 was going from one facility operated by the National Park Service to another.

I picked up fellow Akron Railroad Club member Peter Bowler at a shopping center in Cleveland’s eastern suburbs and we set out for Westfield, New York, with a planned stop at Bort Road in North East, Pennsylvania, to catch Amtrak’s eastbound Lake Shore Limited.

As it turned out, No. 48 was running an hour late, which worked to our advantage because the lighting was much better when it arrived than it would have been had the train been on time.

There were still mostly clear skies as No. 48 came past, but that was about to change.

During our time at Bort Road we also caught three Norfolk Southern trains versus one CSX train. CSX was single-tracking due to a tie replacement program and trains were backed up.

By the time we reached Westfield, there was still no word from the 765 crew on its Twitter feed as to when they would be leaving Buffalo.

Thanks in part to delays incurred leaving Scranton on Canadian Pacific the day before, the 765 had not reached Buffalo until about 4 a.m. So they were not going to get an early morning start westward out of Buffalo on this day.

We had plenty of time to top off my car’s fuel tank and eat breakfast at the Main Street diner in Westfield.

I highly recommend it. They have some of the best toast I’ve ever had. It is made with homemade whole wheat bread. My Italian sausage omelet with home fries wasn’t too shabby either.

From what we could determine, the original section of the diner used to be a railroad car. A couple of railroad switch lanterns also was part of the decor.

Our objective was to get the 765 crossing the trestle over Chautauqua Creek on the west side of town. After breakfast, we found the trestle and settled in for a long wait.

Shortly after we arrived, NS 316, an eastbound NS manifest freight, went past with two CP units on the point. We had seen this same train at Bort Road more than an hour earlier.

The 316 would turn out to be the last train that we photographed on this day in sunlight as the clouds closed in shortly after we saw it at Bort Road. My guess is that it was held at Ripley, New York, for westbound train 145.

A maintenance gang also had the railroad tied up and would figure in a delay that the 765 would incur later.

The Youngstown Line dispatcher had told the foreman of the gang that he and his crew had to be in the siding near Brocton by 12:30 p.m. They didn’t quite make it and the 765 got held in Dunkirk.

As we were eating breakfast, it began raining. Although the rain had stopped by the time the 765 show up, it was cloudy the rest of the day with occasional breaks in the clouds. None of those came when the 765 was around.

The plan was to try to beat the 765 and its train to the Gulf Road crossing near North East after getting our photographs in Westfield.

Just east of Gulf Road the NS tracks cross Twentymile Creek on a trestle. Getting the 765 on bridges was our theme of the day.

The good news was that we did get to Gulf Road ahead of the 765. The bad news is that the crossing gates were coming down as we arrived.

We had time only to just out of the car and get some grab shots. Walking closer to the trestle was out of the question.

The third photo stop would be the trestle over Conneaut Creek. We considered getting the 765 on the trestle over Walnut Creek in Fairview, Pennsylvania, but I feared getting hung up in traffic on U.S. 20 on the drive to Conneaut.

One of my priorities for the day was to get the 765 crossing Conneaut Creek in a view from the U.S. 20 bridge. Peter and I were the only photographers who attempted that shot.

While waiting for the 765 to show up, we got a bonus when a light power move on the Bessemer & Lake Erie came into town with three Illinois Central SD70s in the consist.

After making some images of the 765 during its service stop in Conneaut Yard, we made our way west to the final photo op of the day in Painesville.

I wanted to get an image along the Grand River of the train crossing the trestle. I’ve seen many images taken from river level of trains on the trestle and getting that shot has been on my “to do” list for a long time.

Two factors worked against doing that image on this day. First, the gray sky would not offer much contrast. Second, I didn’t want to walk past some poison ivy plants on the trail to the river because I was wearing shorts.

I also wasn’t keen on the alternate route along the river’s edge through the mud and the large rocks. So we set up at the west edge of the trestle in town.

The 765 was nearly within sight when a Painesville police officer came along and moved us away from the end of the bridge.

I wish I had had more time to consider alternative locations, but that wasn’t to be. I did the best I could with the impromptu location that I chose.

Article and Photographs by Craig Sanders

The first of a three-shot sequence crossing the trestle over Chautauqua Creek in Westfield, New York.

The first of a three-shot sequence crossing the trestle over Chautauqua Creek in Westfield, New York.

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765 in Westfield03-x

Blowing the whistle for the Gulf Road crossing.

Blowing the whistle for the Gulf Road crossing.

The 765 took it slow crossing the Painesville trestle over the Grand River.

The 765 took it slow crossing the Painesville trestle over the Grand River.

Cruising at Painesville.

Cruising at Painesville.

The 765 crew waves to onlookers in Painesville. An online report said that Doyle McCormick would be at the throttle of the 765 as it left Conneaut.

The 765 crew waves to onlookers in Painesville. An online report said that Doyle McCormick would be at the throttle of the 765 as it left Conneaut.