Posts Tagged ‘Pennsylvania State Transportation Commission’

Pennsylvania Updates Transportation Plan

August 15, 2020

The Pennsylvania’s State Transportation Commission said it has updated the state’s 12-year plan to make $64.8 billion available for improvements to railroads, transit systems, roads, bridges and airports.

Overseen by the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation, the new program will become effective on Oct. 1 and anticipates the following funding availability in the first four years from federal, state and local sources:
• $11.4 billion for state highways and bridges;
• $9.4 billion for public transit;
• $321 million for multimodal projects;
• $228 million for freight rail; and
• $138 million for aviation.

The program was described by PennDOT as a multimodal tool to identify and give priority to transportation projects and the funds needed to complete them.

Under state law the program must be updated every two years.

PennDOT said public comments made during the 12-year planning process have played a key role in identifying investments in the various transportation modes.

Pennsylvania Agency OKs Transportation Plan

August 20, 2018

A new 12-year transportation plan has been adopted by the Pennsylvania State Transportation Commission and it is offering $63.9 billion in funding for improvements to railroads, transit systems, roads, bridges and airports.

The new program, which is effective on Oct. 1, allocates $9.62 billion for public transit, $319 million for multimodal and $228 million for freight-rail projects during 2019 through 2022.

From 2023 through 2026, the plan calls for $8.3 billion to be available for public transit, $348 million for multimodal and $229 million for freight rail. From  2027 through 2030, the plan calls for $9.25 billion for transit, $391 million for multimodal and $229 million for freight rail.

The projects depend on the availability of funding, which state transportation officials anticipate will come from a combination of federal, state and local dollars.

State law requires the commission to review and update the 12-year program every two years. No capital project can move forward unless it is included in the program.

The plan will be submitted to the Federal Highway Administration and the Federal Transit Administration for review and approval. The Federal Highway Administration coordinates with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to review the plan’s conformity with air quality requirements.

Pennsylvania Funding 27 Rail Projects

March 29, 2018

The Pennsylvania State Transportation Commission this week announced funding of 27 freight-rail improvement projects.

The projects will receive $32 million through the Rail Transportation Assistance Program and the Rail Freight Assistance Program.

Among the projects approved were:

 R. J. Corman Railroad Group, to rehabilitate 36 miles of track including rail, ties, ballast, and track surfacing on the Clearfield Cluster’s Cherry Tree, Cresson, and Wallaceton subdivisions, $4.2 million.

• Norfolk Southern, to realign track in Middletown to provide greater clearances for freight trains and reduce track curvature, $3.9 million.

• Shell Chemical Appalachia to construct 10 miles of track from Aliquippa to Monaca to transport construction materials for Shell’s plant and outbound product from the completed plant, $3.8 million.

• Allegheny Valley Railroad, to rehabilitate 10 miles of the P&W subdivision from Bakerstown to Glenwood Yard, including replacing continuous welded rail and surfacing track, $2.9 million.

• Wheeling & Lake Erie, to rehabilitate 18 railroad bridges on the Pittsburgh and Rook subdivisions, including structural and bridge deck, $2.3 million.

• Buffalo Pittsburgh Railroad, to rehabilitate 20 miles of track between Brookville and Falls Creek, facilitating continued freight-rail service to Brookville Equipment Corp., $2.1 million.

Pa. Updates 12-Year Transportation Plan

August 13, 2016

A 12-year transportation program adopted by the State Transportation Commission of Pennsylvania calls for spending nearly $62 billion to make improvements to roads, bridges, transit systems, airports and railroads.

PennDotThe Pennsylvania Department of Transportation said the spending in the plan is slightly less than the $63.3 billion outlined in the plan’s previous update in 2014.

“Through ongoing efficiencies at PennDOT, we continue to stretch taxpayers’ dollars to reach as many transportation needs as possible,” said PennDOT Secretary Leslie Richards. “This update reflects the progress we are making, chipping away at our large backlog of pavement and bridge needs while adding some capacity expansion to address long-standing desires for better mobility.”

The plan calls for spending $8.6 billion for public transit, $305 million for multimodal and $229 million for freight-rail projects.

Among the projects identified by the plan is replacement of the Interstate 84 bridges over the Lackawanna County Railroad and Roaring Brook in Lackawanna County, which will cost $143 million.

Under Pennsylvania law, the 12-year program must be updated every two years and no capital project can advanced unless it is part of the plan.

RBM&N Receives Grant From Pennsylvania

June 3, 2016

The Pennsylvania State Transportation Commission has awarded a $5 million grant to the Reading, Blue Mountain & Northern Railroad that will be used in a $14 million bridge rebuilding project.

PennsylvaniaThe Nesquehoning Bridge project in Carbon County will create a connection between two of the railroad’s divisions, thus providing a direct route between Philadelphia and Binghamton, New York.

The work will involve building a new three-span bridge over the Leigh River and installing 1,200 feet of track.

Pennsylvania OKs $36M for Rail Projects

May 16, 2016

Pennsylvania’s state transportation commission has approved $36 million in grants for 31 rail projects over the next five years.

PennsylvaniaFunding will be provided for 15 projects through the Rail Transportation Assistance Program and 16 projects through the Rail Freight Assistance Program.

The projects include:

• $5 million for the Reading Blue Mountain & Northern to construct a new bridge and track across the Lehigh River.

• $3.6 million for Buffalo & Pittsburg  to rebuild Butler Yard and its tracks, restore a crossover connection and repair eight bridges on its northern subdivision.

• $3 million for CSX to construct new main lead track, crossovers, turnouts and derails to allow intermodal trains to pull off the McKees Rocks mainline to serve the Pittsburgh Intermodal Terminal.

• $3.5 million for the SEDA-COG Joint Rail Authority to upgrade five bridges and replace another.

• $3.4 million for the Union Railroad to repair and rehabilitate the East Pittsburgh viaduct, including concrete repairs, structure drainage corrections and a 1,600-foot passing siding, as well as a new walkway and handrails.

• $2 million for the Steelton & Highspire to construct and rehabilitate 13,026 track feet and 22 turnouts serving the Durabond pipe plant, Chemtron weld plant and Arcelor-Mittal’s interchange loading area, and connect track to Norfolk Southern Railway’s interchange and Steelton & Highspire Railroad’s main yard.

• $1.2 million for the Wheeling & Lake Erie to install 20 track miles of continuous welded rail on its Pittsburgh subdivision.

Pennsylvania Updates State Transportation Plan

August 16, 2014

 

Pennsylvania is gearing up to spend $63.2 billion over the next 12 years on transportation projects. Toward that end, the Pennsylvania State Transportation Commission recently updated the state’s transportation program.

The funding is being made available through the state’s Act 89 transportation plan. The projects will include improvements to railroads, roads, bridges, transit systems and airports.

An update to the state transportation two years ago envisioned spending $41.6 billion for transportation projects.
The latest transportation spending program is effective Oct. 1. Over the next four years, Pennsylvania expects to spend $12.3 billion for highway and bridge projects, $7.9 billion for public transit, $370 million for aviation, $228 million for freight railroads and $284 million for a newly-created intermodal fund.

Four rural planning organizations, 19 metropolitan planning organizations and one independent county worked with the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation to review the transportation plan update.

The update will be submitted to the Federal Highway Administration and the Federal Transit Administration for review and approval. The Federal Highway Administration will coordinate with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to review the plan’s conformity with air quality requirements.

The 14-member commission consists of 10 appointed citizens and the majority and minority chairpersons of the state House and Senate transportation committees. State law requires the commission to review and update the 12-year program every two years. No capital project can move forward unless it is included in the program.

To review the plan, go to www.dot.state.pa.us.