Posts Tagged ‘public transit funding’

FTA has $20B in Grant Funding Available

April 7, 2022

The Federal Transit Administration said it will award more than $20 billion in grants in federal fiscal year 2022.

The agency said that was an increase of 58 percent over FY 2021 due to an infusion of funding from the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act.

The funding will be distributed through 30 programs. The funding was approved last month by Congress in the FY 2022 appropriations bill.

In a news release FTA said the funding by program works to the following.

• $6.9 billion for the Urbanized Area Formula Program, which supports transit agencies in large cities and suburbs, 29 percent more than the FY2021 funding level.

• $4.1 billion for the State of Good Repair Formula Program, 52 percent more than the FY2021 funding level.

• $893 million for Rural Area Formula grants, which support transit programs in rural areas, representing 23 percent more than the FY2021 levels.

• $422 million for the Enhanced Mobility of Seniors and Individuals with Disabilities program, representing 44 percent more than the FY2021 level.

• $45 million to support to transit programs run by tribal governments through formula and competitive grants, representing 25 percent more than the FY2021 funding level.

• $49 million for State Safety Oversight, representing 69 percent more than FY2021 funding level.

SEPTA Increases Capital Budget by $95M

March 30, 2022

The Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority has increased its capital budget by $95 million to take into account expected funding from the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act.

That will bring the Philadelphia-based public transit agency’s capital budget up to $713.85 million.

In a news release, SEPTA said projects the agency plans to undertake include stepping up design work for station accessibility upgrades on the Market-Frankford Line, Broad Street Line and Regional Rail network.

The additional investment in design will also ensure the agency is prepared for the federal competitive All Stations Accessibility Program, which is a new program funded under the federal infrastructure bill, SEPTA officials said.

SEPTA said it also plans to proceed with the design and implementation of several major projects, which include a trolley modernization, King of Prussia Rail project and rail vehicle replacement.

NEO Transit Agencies Get FTA Grants

March 13, 2022

Local public transit officials have released information as to how much money they are receiving in Federal Transit Administration grants and for what purposes the funding will be used.

FTA recently announced the awarding of $32,639,029 to improve bus service at five Ohio transit agencies.

Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority plans to use its $4 million to rehabilitate its Hayden bus maintenance facility.

Laketran in Lake County will use its $14,681,981 to expand a bus garage and add an operations and maintenance facility.

Portage Area Regional Transportation Authority will get $1,514,888 to replace older buses.

The Southwest Ohio Regional Transit Authority in Cincinnati will receive $10,134,960 to replace older buses while the Toledo Area Regional Transit Authority will get $2,307,200 to upgrade its maintenance facility and replace older paratransit vehicles.

The funding is coming from the Infrastructure and Jobs Acts approved by Congress last year.

2 Ohio Transit Agencies Receive FTA Grants

March 8, 2022

Two Ohio public transit agencies are among 35 agencies receiving a share of $2.2 billion being awarded by the Federal Transit Administration through the American Rescue Plan.

The agency said in a news release that the funding will help public transportation agencies pay for day-to-day operations.

The agencies received the funding after demonstrating a need for additional financial support to cover expenses related to day-to-day operations, cleaning and sanitization, combating the spread of pathogens on transit systems, and retaining employees, FTA officials said.

The Southwest Ohio Regional Transit Authority (Metro) in Cincinnati will receive $62.3 million to offset an operating deficit and decreased fare and other revenues during the pandemic.

The Toledo Area Regional Transit Authority will receive $13,833,483.

Transit agencies in nearby states receiving funding include Indianapolis Public Transportation Company, $51,029,180; Lehigh and Northampton Transportation Authority (Pennsylvania), $12,544,967; and Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (Philadelphia),  $96,017,640.

Cleveland RTA to get $20.5M in Federal Funding

March 3, 2022

Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority said this week it will receive $20.3 million in funding from the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act.

That funding is part of $1.3 billion in federal dollars that Ohio will receive for public transit agencies over the next five years, GCRTA officials said in a news release.

Ohio urban and rural transit providers will be awarded $260 million in federal fiscal year 2022 with $73.5 million available immediately and the rest available later in the year.

In a statement, GCRTA General Manager and CEO India Birdsong said the funding “will assist us in strengthening our transportation network and associated infrastructure.”

Ohio Public Transit to Get $1.3B Over 5 Years

February 14, 2022

Ohio public transit agencies are expected to share in $1.3 billion in federal funding over the next five years from the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act.

The funding is expected to be released in stages with $260 million being allocated in federal fiscal year 2022.

Of the FY2022 funding, $73.5 million will be available immediately with the remaining money released later this year.

Cleveland will receive $22 million while Akron will get $3 million.

FTA Details IIJA Funding

November 18, 2021

Funding being provided by the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act will help public transit agencies reduce their backlog of maintenance projects by 15 percent and replace more than 500 older subway, light-rail and commuter-rail cars, the Federal Transit Administration said.

The IIJA authorizes up to $108 billion for public transit funding, including $91 billion in guaranteed funding, which FTA termed the most significant federal investment in transit in the nation’s history.

Among the key provisions of the IIJA affecting public transit are $23.1 billion for the State of Good Repair program to assist in financing capital projects to maintain public transit systems; $966.4 million to support metropolitan and statewide planning programs; and up to $23 billion for the Capital Investment Grants (CIG) Program, with $8 billion guaranteed to invest in new high-capacity transit projects.

Four new competitive grant programs were created that include:

  • $1.75 billion for an All Stations Accessibility Program to reduce the number of legacy transit-rail stations that remain inaccessible to individuals with disabilities;
  • $1.5 billion for Rail Vehicle Replacement Grants to replace rail cars that are past their useful life and improve reliability, safety and accessibility for transit passengers;
  • $1 billion for ferry service for rural communities to improve access and mobility in areas where ferry service is a critical link for communities; and
  • $250 million for an electric or low-emitting ferry pilot program to support the transition of passenger ferries to low- or zero-emission technologies.

Senate Bill Boosts Amtrak, Public Transit FY2022 Funding

October 21, 2021

Amtrak and public transit would receive funding boosts for fiscal year 2022 under a draft budget proposal released this week by the Senate Committee on Appropriations.

Funding for the national intercity passenger carrier would be $2.7 billion, an increase of $700,000 over the enacted FY2021 figure of $2 billion.

This includes $1,731,307, 307 for Amtrak’s national network and $968,692,693 for the Northeast Corridor.

Amtrak received in FY2021 $700,000,000 for the NEC and $1,300,000,000 for the national network.

Including various grant programs and capital spending total passenger rail funding would be $3,444,860,000 compared with the FY2021 enacted amount of $2,581,720,000.

Public transit funding was set at $13,462,346,462 compared with the FY2021 enacted $12,959,120462.

The funding is contained in Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act.

Public Transit, High Speed Rail Funding May be Vulnerable to being Slashed from Budget Bill

October 13, 2021

Some congressional observers say that funding for public transit and high speed rail may be vulnerable to being cut as congressional Democrats reduce a $3.5 trillion budget bill to a lesser figure that can win approval of moderate members in the House and Senate.

The publication Rollcall reported that the House budget reconciliation bill allocated $57.3 billion to the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, including $10 billion for transit and $10 billion for high-speed rail.

If that funding is cut, some members of Congress will argue that rail passenger service and public transit already are getting new funding as part of a Senate-approved infrastructure bill that included $550 billion in new spending for transportation and infrastructure.

Certainly the argument that it had some funding in the bipartisan infrastructure bill will make it harder for there to be robust funding,” said Sen. Chris Coons (D-Delaware) when asked about transit and high-speed rail funding.

The infrastructure bill contains $39 billion in new spending for public transit and $66 billion for passenger rail.

The reconciliation bill contains an additional $10 billion each for public transit and high-speed rail. It also has $4 billion for a greenhouse gas reduction program for highways.

Democrats hold slim majorities in both chambers of Congress and have been fighting over the size of the budget bill.

They are using the reconciliation process to be able to pass a budget bill in the Senate by a simple majority to avoid a likely Republican filibuster.

Complicating matter is that some House Democrats have vowed to oppose the infrastructure bill until the House approves the larger reconciliation bill.

Advocates for public transit had pushed for the additional $10 billion in the reconciliation bill to restore what they see as a “cut” in the infrastructure bill of the originally proposed $48.5 billion for transit.

Paul Skoutelas, CEO of the American Public Transportation Association, said the $10 billion for transit in the reconciliation bill is for a new program aimed at linking transit to affordable housing through a new grant program. “It really is unique and different,” he said.

However, Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Chairman Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) and Sen. Patrick J. Toomey (R-Pennsylvania), the committee’s ranking minority member, said the transit allocation in the reconciliation bill violated an agreement not to “double-dip” or spend money on programs that already benefited from the bipartisan infrastructure agreement.

“The transit money is overwhelmingly coming from the bipartisan bill,” Brown said. “No matter what we do on that, that’s not a major hit compared to the tens of billions we put in infrastructure.”

Even if the $10 billion for high speed rail now in the reconciliation bill survives, Jim Mathews, CEO of the Rail Passengers Association, said that isn’t enough to launch a comprehensive high-speed rail program.

“That money is desperately needed to jump-start those kinds of efforts,” he said. “But from a more 50,000-foot level, it was a policy endorsement of an approach we really have to embrace in this country.”

Mathews fears that money for high-speed rail is vulnerable to any effort to trim the size of the budget reconciliation bill.

Adie Tomer, head of the Metropolitan Infrastructure Initiative at the Brookings Institution, said the need to cut money from the reconciliation measure means “everything could be on the table.”

Tomer said in the scheme of things, the transportation items are relatively small so reducing them will make little progress toward reaching the level of cuts needed to satisfy some senators.

“There are hundreds of billions of dollars in infrastructure spending across well over 100 different authorized programs,” he said. “That’s not the place to come up with easy cuts.”

FTA Has $2.2B in Pandemic Grant Funding Available

September 10, 2021

The Federal Transit Administration said this week it will take applications for $2.2 billion in competitive grant funding for transit systems demonstrating additional pandemic-associated needs. 

The grants were allocated by the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021.

FTA officials said additional assistance funding can be awarded to transit systems that demonstrate additional assistance is needed to cover operating expenses related to maintaining day-to-day operations, cleaning and sanitization, combating the spread of pathogens and maintaining critical staffing levels.

Applications for the funding must be submitted by Nov. 8.