Posts Tagged ‘R.J. Corman in Ohio’

Where the Corman Crosses the Wheeling

July 28, 2021

A northbound R.J. Corman train crosses the mainline of the Wheeling & Lake Erie near Brewster on May 19, 2021. The Corman train is on a former Baltimore & Ohio line that once went to Wheeling, West Virginia, and served the southeast Ohio coal fields.

Photograph by Robert Farkas

As Far West as the ex-Erie Goes in Ohio

April 26, 2020

On on Friday I went to Lima, Ohio, where the R.J. Corman was switching the yard and then went west to Elgin, Ohio.

Elgin is as far west as a train can go on the former Erie Railroad mainline as it is abandoned west of there.

Here are some pictures of the train with the top images showing it passing the depot at Spencerville and two others from Elgin.

Article and Photographs by Todd Dillon

When the Wheeling Was Still in the Excursion Business

April 17, 2020

Excursion trains were once a regular sight on the Wheeling & Lake Erie. Many of them were operated by the Orrville Railroad Heritage Society and featured day trips.

W&LE GP35 No. 104 is shown pulling one such ORHS excursion eastbound at the crossing of the Wheeling and R.J. Corman line at Justus east of Brewster on Oct. 13, 2012.

Photograph by Robert Farkas

Out of the Ordinary

November 3, 2019

Here is an out-of-the-ordinary pair of images. At first glance there may be little to surprise you. These two photos were taken about two hours apart.

In the top image R.J. Corman SD40T-2 No. 8336 is backing up westbound into the Wheeling & Lake Erie’s yard in Brewster, Ohio, on Oct. 9, 2019, on W&LE tracks at the W&LE/Corman diamond.

In the bottom image, W&LE SD40T-2 Nos. 8795 and 5413 plus one other locomotive are westbound at the west end of the yard.

Yes, 5413 is a Rio Grande heritage unit, but that was not what surprised me.

Nos. 8336, 8795, and 5413 are not only in three different paint schemes, but all three are tunnel motors.

Article and Photographs by Robert Farkas

At Work on the R.J. Corman in Northeast Ohio

October 22, 2019

R.J. Corman SD40T-2 No. 8336 is shown on Oct. 9, 2019, with just another routine manifest freight.

In the top image, it is backing a string of gondolas west into the Wheeling & Lake Erie railroad yard in Brewster on W&LE tracks at the RJ Corman/W&LE diamond.

The middle image shows another view of the backup move.

Having dropped off the gondolas and picked up mixed freight, No. 8336 is southbound at Justus, Ohio.

Article and Photographs by Robert Farkas

R.J. Corman in Warwick

September 9, 2019

The R.J. Corman branch to Warwick (Clinton) is, arguably, one of the most overlooked rail operations in Northeast Ohio.

In a region with busy Class 1 mainline railroads it is easy to forget about the Corman.

Bob Farkas made this image of RJ Corman 1804 northbound at Warwick on Aug. 3.

Photograph by Robert Farkas

Getting a Rare R.J. Corman Sunday Move

October 25, 2016

An R.J. Corman train cruises southbound along Warwick Drive NW between Clinton and Canal Fulton.

An R.J. Corman train cruises southbound along Warwick Drive NW between Clinton and Canal Fulton.

Since last Sunday was the best weather from the past few days I went to Alliance to railfan. The first couple hours I had two eastbound stack trains but nothing westbound.

I found out that Norfolk Southern was doing track maintenance near Conway and no trains were being run. After noon, I went over to the Sebring model railroad club. Trains were moving here, albeit of the model variety.

After 2 p.m. NS opened the floodgates and I saw four trains in an hour. I relocated to Rootstown, catching another train.

Then I got word that an R.J. Corman train had just gone into Warwick to pick up some cars from CSX. I figured it would take 30-40 minutes to drive there so off I went.

I was just arriving as the train pulled out heading back south. Luckily, it doesn’t going very fast and made for an easy chase.

I got it several times at Canal Fulton and a couple more at Massilon. By now it was after 5 and the light was fading so I ended my chase here.

Article and Photographs by Todd Dillon 

Coming through Canal Fulton.

Coming through Canal Fulton.

A farm south of Canal Fulton.

Passing the large pond of a home south of Canal Fulton.

It must have been a slow day as the railfan chase crew was out in force. I see Bob Farkas at left near the train.

It must have been a slow day as the railfan chase crew was out in force. I see Bob Farkas at left near the train.

R.J. Corman Razes ex-B&O Depot in Dover

October 31, 2015

We’ve received word that sometime this week R.J. Corman tore down Dover’s last remaining railroad station.

The station once served the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad line that extended to Wheeling, West Virginia, via Massillon and Holloway.

A period American Sheet & Tin Plate Company building across the street also was razed a year or two ago.

The former Cleveland, Lorain & Wheeling’s Uhrich Junction freight station is likely to be demolished next as RJC continues its purge of old and no longer used structures.

CSX Using Corman Line Out of Warwick

August 15, 2015

An empty CSX pipe train rumbles into Clinton on the R.J. Corman Cleveland Subdivision.

An empty CSX pipe train rumbles into Clinton on the R.J. Corman Cleveland Subdivision.

One Sunday morning last month I was watching trains on the CSX New Castle Subdivision in Warwick Park in Clinton when I heard the IO dispatcher make reference to a train on the R.J. Corman that had everything tied up near Warwick.

I didn’t think much of it, thinking it was a train in Warwick Yard. But about 10 minutes later I heard a locomotive horn that did not belong to a train on the New Castle Sub.

With the dispatcher’s comments fresh in mind, I hurried over to a crossing of the Corman in Clinton where I spotted a train coming north with two CSX locomotives and a long string of flat cars behind them.

Both were six-axle units, which is not the type of motive power that you typically see on the Corman. For that matter, I’ve never seen a CSX train coming into Clinton from the south on the Corman.

My initial thought is that it was a work train, but why would a CSX work train be on the Corman’s Cleveland Subdivision? There are no connections between the Corman line and any CSX line south of Clinton.

I would later learn that what I had seen was an empty pipe train. It originates in Dothan, Alabama, and brings 36-inch pipe to a storage yard in Massillon at the site of the former Republic Steel complex.

I posted a story on the ARRC blog in late January about how two Massillon area entrepreneurs were developing that site and planned to offer rail service.

They were rehabbing a 3.5-mile rail line that would offer connections to the Corman and to Norfolk Southern. The article mentioned that the site would be storing pipe for a 600-mile project in Ohio, Michigan and Canada.

That might be a proposed pipeline that has generated a great deal of controversy in Akron after several homeowners refused to allow surveyors from Nexus Gas Transmission Company to come onto their property.

The homeowners object to locating a pipeline in what they term a densely populated area with some wanting it to be built farther south.

Several property owners appeared in a Summit County courtroom earlier this week during a hearing to determine if Nexus would be granted a temporary restraining order that forces homeowners to allow Nexus survey crews onto their property.

On Thursday, Summit Common Pleas Judge Mary Margaret Rowlands denied Nexus the temporary restraining order and questioned whether the Texas-based company has the authority that it claims under Ohio law to go onto private property to conduct surveys.

However, Judge Rowlands set an Oct. 26 hearing on the company’s request for a declaratory judgement and permanent injunction. Courts in Medina and Wayne County have also been considering legal actions over the access to property issue.

The pipeline still needs approval of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission before it can be built. Nexus hopes to begin construction in 2017 and begin using the pipeline late that year.

The pipeline would originate in Ohio’s Utica Shale region and go westward to Defiance where it would then veer north to Detroit and join other pipelines leading into Ontario.

The developers of the site where the pipes are being stored, had indicated in January that the first shipments of pipe were expected by Feb. 1.

Apparently, pipe trains have been running steadily to and from Massillon via CSX and the Corman. On CSX, the trains operate as K565 and K566.

Each flatcar can hold five to six pipes. Each train typically has 50 to 60 cars. CSX motive power has remained on the trains as they travel over the Corman’s Cleveland Subdivision to and from Warwick.

The CSX traffic has added traffic to a line that has had less than daily service in recent years. Ohio Central used to use the Corman line to Warwick to interchange with CSX, but has switched that interchange to Columbus.

The pipe trains are limited to 20 mph while on Corman property, thus making them easy to chase.

The Corman continues to interchange at Warwick, but there has been talk that Corman might move its interchange elsewhere, raising doubts about the future of the route north of Massillon.

Article and Photographs by Craig Sanders

A long string of flatcars stretched out behind the motive power.

A long string of flatcars stretched out behind the motive power.

A lone boxcar was the only car in the consist that wasn't a flat car.

A lone boxcar was the only car in the consist that wasn’t a flat car.

It turns out that the term "Pennsy" on this flat car refers to a railcar component and parts company based in West Chester, Pennsylvania, and not to the railroad that once owned one of the tracks between Warwick and Mace Tower in Massillon.

It turns out that the term “Pennsy” on this flat car refers to the Pennsylvania Rail Car Company, a maker of components and parts based in Mercer, Pennsylvania, and not to the railroad that once owned one of the tracks between Warwick and Mace Tower in Massillon.