Posts Tagged ‘steam locomotives’

Reading 2102 May Run in 2017

January 22, 2016

Reading Company 4-8-4 No. 2102 will be restored to operating condition by the Reading Blue Mountain & Northern Railroad.

The RBN&N said the tender has been separated from the Northern-type locomotive as a first step toward restoration.

In a news release, the railroad said that crews have removed the front end and work has begun on the cab.

The cab, jacketing, piping, super heater units, tubes and flues will be removed and the locomotive is expected to be disassembled to allow for ultrasonic testing and inspection.

After that, the Federal Railroad Administration Form 4 (1,472-day) inspection will be conducted.

Andrew Muller, Jr., owner and CEO of the RBN&N said the T-1 may be operational by mid-2017.

The restoration is being done at the railroad’s shops in Port Clinton, Pennsylvania.

The RBN&N said it carried 100,000 passengers on its excursion trains in 2015, which is about 30 percent higher than 2014 ridership.

RBM&N owns more than 300 miles of railroad along with operational steam locomotive No. 425, two rail-diesel cars and more than 35 diesel locomotives. It employs more than 200 people.

L&N 2132 Arrives at Corbin Museum Site

January 20, 2016

Louisville & & Nashville No. 2132 is back in Corbin, Kentucky, after traveling by truck from Georgia.

Movement of the 0-8-0 was spearheaded by the Corbin Tourism and Convention Commission, which is working to establish a railroad museum in the the former L&N passenger station in Corbin

The museum is focusing on displaying equipment relevant to eastern Kentucky and the L&N.

The steam locomotive arrived in Corbin on Monday and will join an L&N steel bay-window at the museum.

No. 2132 is one of just three surviving L&N steam locomotives. The fleet once numbered about 1,100 engines. Two other surviving L&N steam locomotives are owned by the Kentucky Railway Museum in New Haven

Built by the L&N in its South Louisville shops, No. 2132 was one of 400 steam engines built there and the only one not be scrapped.

After being sold to a Florida power plant in 1951, No. 2132 later ended up on static display in Bainbridge, Georgia.

The city of Bainbridge agreed to sell No. 2132 to Corbin interests for a nominal fee.

The Corbin museum plans to undertake a cosmetic restoration of No. 2132, which is mostly intact.  To be added to the locomotive are a whistle, bell, headlight, reproduction number and builder’s plates

The 2132 also will receive a boiler jacket, new jackets on its cylinders, and patching and replacement of rusted metal.

The goal of the restoration is to return the 2132 to the appearance that it had when it left the South Louisville shops.

Working on a Steam Train

January 18, 2016
Getting a brief glimpse inside the cab of Everett Railroad No. 11.

Getting a brief glimpse inside the cab of Everett Railroad No. 11.

I make it a point when I’m chasing a steam train to try to photograph the crew at work. It isn’t always easy when the train is moving, so your best opportunities are during service stops or switching maneuvers.

Here is a selection of images I made last month while chasing Everett Railroad No. 11 during a holiday-themed excursion out of Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania.

The theme of this series is railroaders at work.

Photographs by Craig Sanders

A firm grip on the throttle from the engineer's seat.

A firm grip on the throttle from the engineer’s seat.

Keeping track of the pressure on the fireman's side.

Keeping track of the pressure on the fireman’s side.

Backing out over a switch before moving forward to join the rest of the train.

Backing out over a switch before moving forward to join the rest of the train.

Locomotive and passenger car are almost coupled together as a crew member gives hand signals.

Locomotive and passenger car are almost coupled together as a crew member gives hand signals.

Keeping a watchful eye on the moving parts.

Keeping a watchful eye on the moving parts.

When backing up, the visibility is better if you sit on the window ledge on the fireman's side.

When backing up, the visibility is better if you sit on the window ledge on the fireman’s side.

L&N 152 Restoration Moving Forward

January 11, 2016

Louisville & Nashville 4-6-2 No. 152 would be returned to operating condition under a plan being worked out by the Kentucky Railway Museum

The museum, which owns 110-year-old locomotive, is working with a group of historic rail equipment experts, including the Coalition for Sustainable Rail.

The Minnesota-based group specializes in research and education of historic rail equipment and will provide engineering and inspection oversight in returning the 152 to service.

Museum work forces have been preparing the locomotive and boiler for inspection, including removal of boiler tubes and flues, boiler jacketing and firebox components

A CSR crew will inspect the boiler ultrasonically and perform an inspection of the overall locomotive and tender to determine remaining work.

No. 152 has been out of service since 2011 after an inspection found found leaky boiler tubes at the bottom of the rear tube sheet.

AOS Roundhouse Has Run Out of Space

December 31, 2015

Jerry Jacobson’s roundhouse is full. The Age of Steam Roundhouse in Sugar Creek recently announced on its website sit that with the arrival of a 2-10-0 purchased earlier this year that all stalls in the roundhouse are taken.

The 18th locomotive to be housed in the roundhouse arrived on Dec. 29. It is Alabama, Tennessee & Northern as No.401, which was later owned by the Woodward Iron Company where it has roster number 41.

Jerry purchased it at an auction conducted by the Mid-Continent Railroad Museum in North Freedom, Wisconsin. No. 401 was built in 1928 by the Baldwin Locomotive Works.

More information about No. 41 and photographs of it being unloaded are available at:

http://ageofsteamroundhouse.com/2-10-0%20No%2041.html

Chasing the Everett Railroad No. 11

December 30, 2015
Passengers mill about the depot in Holidaysburg, Pennsylvania, as Everett No. 11 waits for its departure time. Both trips on this day were sold out.

Passengers mill about the depot in Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania, as Everett No. 11 waits for its departure time. Both trips on this day were sold out.

During the past year I’ve written a handful of posting for the Akron Railroad Club blog about the restoration of Everett Railroad steam locomotive No.11.

But at the time it was just another story about a faraway piece of equipment.

Then my friend Adam Barr called and suggested we travel to Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania, and chase No. 11 as it pulled one of the holiday season trains.

The only date that worked for both of us was a Sunday in mid December. No. 11 would pull two trips that day and we wanted to get both of them.

Adam had some familiarity with the Everett because he had operated a speeder over the line several years ago.

The locomotive and its train were sitting in the station when we arrived.

Our first series of photographs would be made from the nearby Pennsylvania Route 36 bridge over the tracks.

When we planned this trip, we thought we might get the locomotive operating with snow on the ground.

How nice it would have been to have made an image with a waiting steam locomotive sitting at a depot with the word “holiday” in its name.

But the unseasonably warm temperatures this month put the kibosh on that. Maybe next year.

If you’ve followed the No. 11 story, you know that it is a 2-6-0 built by American Locomotive Company in 1923.

It was expected to be sold for use in the sugar cane fields of Cuba, but that didn’t pan out.

Instead, No. 11 was sold to the Narragansett Pier Railroad in Rhode Island where it worked until 1938 when it was acquired by the Bath & Hammondsport in New York state.

Then it moved on to the Middletown & New Jersey in 1982. That company in turn sold No. 11 to the Everett in 2006.

It would be a nearly a decade before No. 11 was restored to operating condition and returned to revenue service.

The train had a combine and two coaches. It was an impressive-looking consist and you could easily believe that you’d been transported back to the 1930s when branch line passenger trains looked like this.

Chasing No. 11 was not overly difficult. The train didn’t travel all that fast and much of the time the tracks ran parallel with Reservoir Road.

The train ran as far as East Freedom, which is just beyond where the junction at Brookes Mill where the Everett separates into branches for Sproul and Curry. It is, of course, all former Pennsylvania Railroad territory.

At East Freedom, No. 11 ran around its train and ran tender forward back to Hollidaysburg.

We chased the second trip as far as East Freedom and decided to call it a day.

We drove to Altoona and had dinner at The Knickerbocker Tavern to which we were attracted because of it large selection of beers.

I was mildly amused that a tavern in Altoona in the heart of PRR country would have the same name as a former New York Central passenger train.

But the beer and atmosphere were great. The tavern is housed in a Philadelphia-style row house built in 1903 to provide housing for workers at the PRR’s nearby South Altoona shops.

The name came from the construction company that built the structure, not the NYC passenger train.

Article and Photographs by Craig Sanders

No. 11 had a nice looking train. Ignore the modern vehicles in the foreground and the building in the background and you might think it was the 1930s.

No. 11 had a nice looking train. Ignore the modern vehicles in the foreground and the building in the background and you might think it was the 1930s.

Getting up a head of steam after the conductor gave the highball command.

Getting up a head of steam after the conductor gave the highball command.

Getting underway with the first trip of the day out of Hollidaysburg. That's the Blair County Courthouse in the background.

Getting underway with the first trip of the day out of Hollidaysburg. That’s the Blair County Courthouse in the background.

Putting on a steam and smoke show, the best we would see all day.

Putting on a steam and smoke show, the best we would see all day.

We found enough of an opening in the trees to get a decent shot from along Reservoir Road.

We found enough of an opening in the trees to get a decent shot from along Reservoir Road.

Rounding the curve as the train comes into Kladder and a crossing with Monastery Road.

Rounding the curve as the train comes into Kladder and a crossing with Monastery Road.

Passing a Christmas tree farm, which was doing a brisk business today.

Passing a Christmas tree farm, which was doing a brisk business today.

Passing through Kladder, which is the home of a monastery run by the Franciscan Friars.

Passing through Kladder, which is the home of a monastery run by the Franciscan Friars.

The second run has just gotten underway and is about a mile from the Holidaysburg depot as it crosses Beaverdam Branch just before River Road.

The second run has just gotten underway and is about a mile from the Holidaysburg depot as it crosses Beaverdam Branch just before River Road.

Look what we found in the woods today.

Look what we found in the woods today.

 

The horses were in the barn lot rather than the field during the second run of Everett No. 11 and its holiday train.

The horses were in the barn lot rather than the field during the second run of Everett No. 11 and its holiday train.

Striking a profile pose while passing a pond alongside Reservoir Road.

Striking a profile pose while passing a pond alongside Reservoir Road.

Approaching the crossing Brooks Boulevard, which is nearly the end of the journey from Holidaysburg.

Approaching the crossing Brooks Boulevard, which is nearly the end of the journey from Holidaysburg.

Everett 15

Steamer En Route to AOS Spotted on NS

December 19, 2015

Online reports on Friday indicated that a steam locomotive en route to the Age of Steam Roundhouse in Sugarcreek is on the road.

The Woodward Iron Co. Baldwin 2-10-0 No. 41 was spotted on a flat car in a manifest freight on the Chicago Line of Norfolk Southern in northern Indiana.

AOS owner Jerry Jacobson purchased the decapods earlier this year from the Mid-Continent Railroad Museum in Freedom, Wisconsin.

Steamer Moves Under Own Power at Steamtown

December 14, 2015

Former Jackson Iron & Steel Company 0-6-0 No. 26 moved under steam last week at Steamtown National Historic Site, thus giving the park an operable steam locomotive.

It was the first time in 15 years that the Baldwin-built engine has moved under its own power.

Built in 1926, the locomotive was test fired in December 2014. Steamtown acquired it in January 1990. Steamtown last had an operable steam locomotive in 2012.

No. 26 backed out onto the turntable in Scranton and ran back and forth through the former Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad yard for much of the afternoon.

Crews had fired up the locomotive earlier in the week and fixed a few minor problems that they encountered.

Mechanic and preservation specialist Bruce Mowbray told Trains magazine that most of the issues stemmed from a troublesome air compressor.

Steamtown officials expect No. 26 to be ready to pull yard excursions in 2016.

Next up on the restoration list at Steamtown will be Boston & Maine 4-6-2 No. 3713.

Steamtown Superintendent Deborah Conway has said that the park hopes to eventually have three or four operating steam within the next 10 years.

AOS Adding a 2-10-0 to its Collection

December 3, 2015

A new locomotive is expected to arrive at the Age of Steam Roundhouse in Sugar Creek later this month.

Woodward Iron Company Baldwin 2-10-0 No. 41 was to be loaded onto a heavy-duty flatcar this past Tuesday and transported from Wisconsin.

“We hope to see it at the roundhouse before Christmas,” Tim Sposato of the AOS told Trains magazine.

Sposato said the locomotive’s tender was trucked to the AOS Roundhouse about a month ago. The tender body was on one trailer, while the frame and trucks were on a second rig.

Roundhouse owner Jerry Jacobson purchased No. 41 in May 2015 from the Mid-Continent Railroad Museum in North Freedom.

No. 41 was built in 1928 for the Alabama Tennessee & Northern, acquired by Woodward in 1948 and retired in 1959.

It was donated to Mid-Continent in 1965 but never operated there.

Instead, Mid-Continent auctioned No. 41, another steam locomotive and several pieces of rolling stock as part of a fund-raising campaign to help fund the restoration of Chicago & Northwestern 4-6-0 No. 1385.

C&O 1309 Firebox in ‘Like New’ Condition

November 28, 2015

Workers restoring Chesapeake & Ohio No. 1309 report that the firebox of the 2-6-6-2 locomotive is in “like new condition.”

The restoration is being undertaken at the Western Maryland Scenic Railroad. Officials of Steam Operation Corporation conducted an ultrasound study of the locomotive’s boiler last month and conclude that the C&O might have replaced the firebox late in the engine’s service career.

The testing showed several areas of the boiler and rear tube sheet that had erosion and other potential issues.

Although the boiler and rear tube sheet meet current Federal Railroad Administration standards, they will need to be patched in several places within the next three to five years.

Western Maryland Scenic General Superintendent Mike Gresham said the timeline to return the 1309 to service has been delayed in order to give shop forces additional time to make those patches and bring the boiler into substantially “as-built” condition.

“Although we could operate No. 1309 without repair to some of the corrosion damaged areas, it’s really the only logical decision to make repairs now while the locomotive is disassembled even if it means a delay to [No. 1309’s] return to service. Otherwise, we’d have to be making significant repairs to No. 1309 in three to five years,” Gresham said.

The Western Maryland Scenic has launched a “1309 Completion Campaign” fundraising effort that is seeking to reap $200,000. The railroad hopes to have the 1309 pulling trains by mid-2016.

“From its beginning, this has been a grassroots effort without the direct support of major corporations or the railroad industry,” WM officials wrote in a letter to supporters.

Donors who give a gift of $500 or greater will receive cab ride in the 1309 during a regularly scheduled excursion.

A donation of $1,000 or greater will earn 30 minutes of throttle time, which increases to an hour with a gift of $2,000 or more.

The 1309 is expected to return to service on July 24, 2016.


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