Posts Tagged ‘Toledo Ohio’

Critter in Toledo

April 21, 2022

This unnumbered “critter” was spotted at the W.A. Koppers plant in Toledo on July 21, 1982. We don’t know anything about its background, but the Kopper website describes the company as “an integrated global producer of carbon compounds, chemicals, and treated wood products for the aluminum, railroad, specialty chemical, utility, rubber, steel, residential lumber, and agriculture industries.” It is headquartered in Pittburgh.

Photograph by Robert Farkas

Well Done Early Conrail Patch Job

February 9, 2022

Conrail 6104 is in Toledo on Aug. 22, 1977. As Conrail patch jobs go, this one was well done when compared to the big black square patches some locomotives received.

Photograph by Robert Farkas

Rail Passenger Funding, Running Amtrak on Time, New NS President Didn’t Impress Some Workers

January 17, 2022

Bit and pieces of insights into the workings of railroad world . . .

I recently received in my email inbox a message quoting Evan Stair of the Friends of the Southwest Chief group in which he suggested that the promise of new and expanded service contained in the Amtrak Connects US plan is largely a mirage.

Stair, whose group has been promoting additional Amtrak service along Colorado’s Front Range and extending the Heartland Flyer north of Oklahoma City to connect with the Chief in Kansas, was commenting on a Bloomberg News story in which Amtrak President Stephen Gardner said the plan to add 39 new routes will require state financial support.

Amtrak has estimated the plan will cost $75 billion to implement.

In his interview, Gardner characterized the federal government as the capital partner but the ongoing operating expenses are the responsibility of the states and Amtrak.

And Amtrak has made clear that it’s responsibility to pay operating expenses will only last at best for five years. After that states will be on the hook to pay operating expenses as is the case now with state-supported corridors on the West Coast, in the Midwest and along the East Coast.

“I frankly believe the Amtrak Connects US program will result in few, if any new routes,” Stair wrote. “States are unlikely to commit to long-term operational dollars without some federal operational matches.”

Stair is probably right about that but could have gone even farther. It may not be realistic to think that states that are not now and/or have never paid Amtrak for corridor service will do so in the future even with a short-term Amtrak funding match for operational expenses.

Yes, I’m talking about you, Ohio.

Speaking of Amtrak, Canadian Pacific CEO Keith Creel told a Midwest shippers conference in Chicago last week that he was “proud” of having reached an agreement with the passenger carrier to allow for the prospect of additional passenger service on routes operated by CP and it merger partner Kansas City Southern.

As reported by Trains magazine, Creel also talked about how CP has become one of Amtrak’s best host railroads in dispatching its trains on time. It wasn’t always that way.

“Five years ago, six years ago, we didn’t lead the industry in Amtrak service,” Creel said.

He went on to say that his 30 years as an operating officer taught him that it’s not easy for a freight railroad to coexist with passenger service.

“I understand the conflicts sometimes and the tradeoffs sometimes when you mix high speed passenger rail with what is, in comparative terms, low-speed freight rail,” Creel said. “I understand the track geometry challenges, I understand the speed challenges. But I also understand that if you prioritize right, and there’s tradeoffs, and balance in a partnership, you can succeed. And that’s the approach we’ve taken at CP.”

Creel’s comments suggest that having the right attitude is key to running passenger trains on time and if CP can do it so could the other Class 1 Amtrak host railroads.

Yet CP doesn’t host as many Amtrak trains as its Class 1 brethren and doesn’t host any long-distance trains over thousands of miles.

Perhaps the best that can be expected is that the host railroads could do better than they do, but dispatching is a balancing act and there will be times when a host railroad puts its own interests ahead of avoiding delaying Amtrak for what the host sees as a relatively short period of time.

Speaking at the same shipper’s conference, new Norfolk Southern President Alan Shaw told a story of how on his first day in his new post he decided to go out into the field and meet and greet NS operating employees in Toledo, which is the largest NS crew change point on the system.

 “I wanted to thank [the employees] for their dedication to Norfolk Southern and our customers, and I wanted to get their input into how we fix service and how we continue to improve our productivity,” Shaw said.

As reported by Trains magazine on its website, Shaw said he approached some workers sitting outside the crew room.

He was wearing khakis, boots and a collared shirt and the workers thought he was an operations supervisor.

 “So I walk up and introduce myself. They told me their names, and one of the guys said, ‘Well, what do you do?’ I said, ‘Well, I’m the president’. And he looks at me, and I’m like, ‘Not Joe Biden president, but president of Norfolk Southern.’ And the other dude pulls out his phone, and he’s like, ‘Oh, yeah, yeah, yeah, I see the announcement. Congratulations!

“So that made me feel good. And then the one guy looks at me and says, ‘What craft did you come from?  . . . Were you mechanical, or engineering, or a conductor, or an engineer?’

“And I was like, ‘No, I started in finance.’ He was really not impressed with that. He goes, ‘Man, at some point, we’re going to have a craft employee running the railroad.’

“It is somewhat humbling when you go out there and talk to them, because they’ve got their own expectations.”

Shaw is right about that, but expectations are not reality. It’s possible that a future railroad president might have worked as a craft employee at an early point in his or her railroad career, but it is not realistic to think that C suite executives will be pulled from the ranks of operating or maintenance employees.

If you want to be a railroad president you need to have spent extensive time in such areas as finance, law or marketing and moved up the ranks in those departments.

Operating employees are not the only railroad stakeholders who have expectations and the expectations of some stakeholders carry more weight than those of others.

Shaw told another story about his first conversation with members of the railroad’s board of directors.

 “Their primary message to me was, ‘Don’t mess up,’” Shaw said. “Now, it was a little more forceful than that. I’ll let you use your imagination what the real verb was that they used.”

I think we can easily figure that one out.

NYC F7A in Toledo

October 28, 2021

Although Penn Central had been in operation for more than eight months when this photograph was made on Nov. 29, 1968, former New York Central F7A 1696 was still looking much its former self as it sat in Toledo.

Photograph by Robert Farkas

Catching Some ‘Annie’ in Toledo

October 6, 2021

Ann Arbor GP35 No. 393 is in Toledo on Aug. 24, 1977. It was built in June 1964 and later worked for the Tuscola & Saginaw Bay as well as the Great Lakes Central.

Photograph by Robert Farkas

Working for Conrail at the Time

July 30, 2021

At the time this image was made, this Canadian National unit was leased to Conrail. It is working in Stanley Yard in Toledo on Oct. 14, 1977.

Photograph by Robert Farkas

Crash that Killed 2 Halts NS Chicago Line Traffic

June 8, 2020

Rail traffic on the Chicago Line of Norfolk Southern was halted for several hours on Sunday afternoon after a grade crossing incident that killed two near Toledo and involved two NS trains.

An Ohio State Highway Patrol spokesman said the two deaths occurred in a pickup truck that drove around a downed crossing gate at the crossing of Holland-Sylvania Road near Angola Road on the Toledo-Springfield Township border.

The pickup was struck by westbound NS train 25N which pushed the truck into the front of eastbound 18M, which was stopped at the time.

The 18M was being led by NS 8104, the Lehigh Valley heritage locomotive.

Police said the pickup truck caught fire after the collision and firefighters were called to extinguish the blaze.

The crash occurred about 1:45 p.m. The 18M was stopped at the scene until 6:30 p.m. and roads in the vicinity remained blocked until 7:15 p.m.

Authorities said debris from the truck was strewn along the right of way.

The victims were not initially identified. Police said the victims died at the scene and alcohol is not thought to have been a factor in the incident.

The truck was headed northbound on Holland-Sylvania before the crash.

Working in Toledo

February 6, 2020

Detroit & Toledo Shore Line GP7 No. 50 leads a train in Toledo on July 20, 1982. This unit was built by EMD in February 1953.

It would later join the roster of the Bay Colony Railroad, a short line based in Dartmouth, Massachusetts.

At the Bay Colony it would initially wear roster number 1501 before being rebuilt into a GP8 and being renumbered 1701. It now wears number 1750.

Photograph by Robert Farkas

Michigan Railroad Club to Meet Wednesday

February 2, 2020

A program about the railroads of Toledo will be featured at the February meeting of The Michigan Railroad Club.

The club meeting begins at 7 p.m. on Feb. 5 at the Ford Community and Performing Arts Center, 15801 Michigan Ave, in Dearborn, Club Room No. 1.

The program, titled, Toledo Railfanning will be presented by Mark Cowles and will take a look at railroads and boats.

The meeting is expected to end by 9 p.m. Visitors are welcome.

The club has program slot opening for 2021 and is soliciting presenters.

When Stanley Yard Still Had a Hump

January 23, 2020

I’ve only photographed Stanley Yard in Toledo once and that was one of those outings where I was out to get one thing and happened to get a few others along the way.

Stanley was built by the Toledo & Ohio Central in the early 1900s and later served New York Central, Penn Central, Conrail. It is now owned by CSX.

CSX tried closing Stanley in early 2004 but had to reopen it when the freight congestion in nearby yards became too much.

In March 2017 CSX closed the hump at Stanley, which can be seen above although at the time I was there it was idle.

At right is a Canadian National transfer run that is arriving off the former Toledo Terminal on May 13 2012.