Posts Tagged ‘Transportation spending’

House Budget Bill Boosts Transportation Spending

July 20, 2021

The House Appropriations Committee last week approved a spending bill for fiscal year 2022 that would boost spending on transportation programs over FY2021 levels.

The bill, known as the Transportation, and Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies legislation provides an increase of $1.9 billion for the U.S. Department of Transportation.

USDOT is allocated $105.7 billion in budgetary resources, a 22 percent increase above the FY2021 enacted level ($86.7 billion) and the President Joseph Biden’s FY2022 budget request of $87 billion.

Among the spending levels authorized for transportation programs are:

• $1.2 billion for National Infrastructure Investments, a 20 percent increase from FY 2021. It includes $20 million for Transportation Planning Grants to assist areas of persistent poverty, a 100 percent increase over FY 2021. An additional $100 million is included for a new grant program to “spur thriving communities nationwide.”

•$4.1 billion for the Federal Railroad Administration, up 46 percent from FY 2021. This includes $625 million for the new Passenger Rail Improvement, Modernization, and Expansion (PRIME) grant program “to support projects that improve, expand or establish passenger rail service”; $500 million for the Consolidated Rail Infrastructure and Safety Improvements (CRISI) grant program, a 33 percent increase from FY 2021; $2.7 billion for Amtrak, a 35 percent boost over FY 2021, which includes $1.2 billion for Northeast Corridor Grants and $1.5 billion for National Network Grants.

• $15.5 billion for the Federal Transit Administration, including $12.2 billion for Transit Formula Grants to expand bus fleets and increase the transit state of good repair; $2.5 billion for Capital Investment Grants to construct more than 23 new transit routes nationwide, a 22 percent increase above the FY 2021 enacted level and equal to the president’s budget request; and $580 million for Transit Infrastructure Grants to purchase more than 300 zero-emission buses and 400 diesel buses, and to support “transformative research for transit systems,” which is a 12 percent increase above FY 2021.

Biden Proposes $25.6B USDOT Budget

April 14, 2021

The Biden administration has proposed a $25.6 billion budget for the U.S. Department of Transportation for federal fiscal year 2022.

That would be an increase of $317 million, or 1.3 percent, over what Congress enacted for FY 2021.

The Office of Management and Budget said that figure is “only a fraction” of the DOT’s “total budgetary resources.”

OMB said most DOT’s financial assistance to states, localities and transportation authorities is provided through mandatory funding derived from the Highway Trust Fund, as part of multiyear surface transportation authorizations.

The administration has proposed that Congress approve $625 million for a new passenger rail competitive grant program, $375 million for Consolidated Rail Infrastructure and Safety Improvement grants, $2.7 billion for Amtrak, $2.5 billion for the Capital Investment Grant program, and $250 million for grants for transit agencies to purchase low- and no-emission buses.

The later combined with the assumed $55 million of contract authority of the FAST Act, would provide $305 million for the Low or No Emission Grant Program.

The budget also proposes $110 million to establish a “Thriving Communities Initiative Pilot,” which would provide “funding for grants and technical assistance to communities” and “serve as a down-payment on advancing transportation equity.”

The Better Utilizing Investments to Leverage Develop grant program would receive $1 billion.

Infrastructure Plan May be 3 Smaller Plans

September 5, 2017

The Trump Administration has signaled that it plans to break up its $1 trillion infrastructure plan into three components.

White House director of the Office of Management and Budget Mick Mulvaney said last week during a conference of state transportation officials that most funding will be offered to projects that currently have private or local money secured.

However, the administration has suggested it will focus on a less ambitious $200 billion infrastructure plan, as opposed to the $1 trillion that President Trump campaigned on.

Details of the infrastructure plan have yet to be released, which has led some transportation officials to fear that the funding will be spread too thin and fails to provide adequate resources for projects.

Transportation officials have noted that the administration has said that its plan will cover a wide range of investments, including roads and bridges, broadband, energy, and veterans hospitals.

Some universities are seeking to have research labs included in the rebuilding effort.

House Committee Increases Some Transportation Spending

July 24, 2017

A House appropriations committee has approved a transportation spending bill for fiscal year 2018 that saves funding of Amtrak long-distance trains and increases spending on passenger rail by $360 million.

Much of the funding increase would be channeled toward fixing infrastructure in the Northeast Corridor. The bill allocates $900 million toward the Gateway program in New York and New Jersey.

However, the bill is less favorable toward funding of public transit. It cuts some funding by $662 million even as it keeps a key investment program that has funded rail transit and commuter rail projects. The TIGER grant program would also be cut.

The funding bill was approved primarily along party lines with many committee Democrats voting against it because they want to see more infrastructure spending.

But Republicans countered that adding additional funding would cause the bill to fail on the House floor.

The full House must still act on the bill while the Senate has yet to take up its own transportation spending bill. FY 2018 will begin on Oct. 1.

Transportation Infrastructure Needs Nearly $1B

January 17, 2017

Transportation infrastructure in the United States needs a $926 billion upgrade, the U.S. Department of Transportation says in a new report.

US DOTOf that, $26.4 million is needed per year to bolster the condition of rail and bus transit systems.

The report noted that transit route miles grew by more than 30 percent between 2002 and 2012

Light rail transit systems grew faster than any other mode of public transportation.

The report was given to Congress as part of DOT’s 2015 Conditions and Performance report, which is submitted on a biennial basis.

The last report, dated 2012, said that rail transit and bus systems needed a $17 billion per year upgrade.

Pennsylvania Updates State Transportation Plan

August 16, 2014

 

Pennsylvania is gearing up to spend $63.2 billion over the next 12 years on transportation projects. Toward that end, the Pennsylvania State Transportation Commission recently updated the state’s transportation program.

The funding is being made available through the state’s Act 89 transportation plan. The projects will include improvements to railroads, roads, bridges, transit systems and airports.

An update to the state transportation two years ago envisioned spending $41.6 billion for transportation projects.
The latest transportation spending program is effective Oct. 1. Over the next four years, Pennsylvania expects to spend $12.3 billion for highway and bridge projects, $7.9 billion for public transit, $370 million for aviation, $228 million for freight railroads and $284 million for a newly-created intermodal fund.

Four rural planning organizations, 19 metropolitan planning organizations and one independent county worked with the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation to review the transportation plan update.

The update will be submitted to the Federal Highway Administration and the Federal Transit Administration for review and approval. The Federal Highway Administration will coordinate with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to review the plan’s conformity with air quality requirements.

The 14-member commission consists of 10 appointed citizens and the majority and minority chairpersons of the state House and Senate transportation committees. State law requires the commission to review and update the 12-year program every two years. No capital project can move forward unless it is included in the program.

To review the plan, go to www.dot.state.pa.us.