Posts Tagged ‘U.S. Bureau of Transportation Statistics’

Transborder Rail Freight Down in April

June 28, 2021

Rail freight moving among the United States, Canada and Mexico in April was worth $15.7 billion, down 5.7 percent compared with March.

However April of this year posted a 164.4 percent gain over April 2020, when North America was mired in pandemic-related shutdowns, the U.S. Bureau of Transportation Statistics said.

The value of freight moved by rail in April 2021 rose 0.7 percent from the $15.6 billion moved in April 2019.

Rail freight moving between the United States and Canada in April was worth $8.4 billion, up 132.4 percent year over year.

Rail freight moving between the United States and Mexico was worth $7.3 billion, up 213.9 percent year over year.

The top three commodities moved by rail in April were: motor vehicles and parts at $6 billion; mineral fuels at $1.4 billion; and wood and articles at $1.3 billion.

Freight moved by all transportation modes in April was worth $107.4 billion, up 84.7 percent from April 2020’s level. April 2021 transborder freight was up 2.7 percent compared with April 2019’s level.

Value of Transborder Freight up 30% in March

June 8, 2021

The U.S. Bureau of Transportation Statistics said this week the volume of freight moved by rail among the United States, Canada and Mexico in March was worth $16.7 billion, up 30 percent compared with February 2021 and up 11.4 percent compared with March 2020.

The latter month marked the start of the COVID-19 pandemic that depressed rail traffic.

Rail freight in March 2021 was up 2.8 percent compared with $16.2 billion in March 2019.

By border, the value of freight moved between the United States and Canada in March was $9.4 billion, up 29.6 percent compared with February’s level and up 18.5 percent compared with March 2020.

The value of freight moved between the United States and Mexico was up 30.6 percent compared with February and up 3.5 percent compared with March 2020.

The top three commodities moved by rail in March were motor vehicles and parts at $7 billion, mineral fuels at $1.6 billion, and wood and articles, up $1.1 billion.

Total transborder freight moved by all modes in March was $114.6 billion, up 19.5 percent compared with February levels and up 16 percent compared with March 2020.

Transferred freight rose 6.9 percent compared with the $107.2 billion worth of freight moved in March 2019.
The most widely used mode for freight was truck with rail coming in second.

Transborder Freight Value Down in February

May 8, 2021

The value of transborder freight moving by rail among the United States, Canada and Mexico in February was $12.8 billion, down 7.5 percent compared with January’s level and down 10.8 percent compared with February 2020, according to the U.S. Bureau of Transportation Statistics.

BTS said the decrease in rail between 2021 and 2020 was primarily due to a decline in motor vehicles and parts, the largest commodity moved across the border by rail.

The value of freight moved by all transportation modes among the three countries in February totaled $95.9 billion, up 1.7 percent compared to January, but down 0.1 percent compared to February 2020.

Freight moved by rail represented 13.4 percent of all transborder freight during February.

Between the United States and Canada freight moving by rail was worth $7.3 billion, down 1.2 percent from a year ago.

The value of freight moving by rail between the United States and Mexico in February was worth $5.6 billion, down 20.8 percent year over year.

Transborder Freight Fell in 2020

March 11, 2021

Freight moving among the United States, Canada and Mexico fell 13.3 percent in 2020  to $1.06 trillion the U.S. Bureau of Transportation Statistics said this week.

The comparison was with calendar year 2019. In a news release, BTS said total transborder freight in fell every month from the start of the COVID-19 pandemic until rising 0.4 percent in December.

Rail was the second-most used mode, handling $148 billion worth of freight in 2020, a 16.9 percent decrease compared with 2019’s level.

The value of freight moved by rail last year between the United States and Canada was $79 billion, down 18.3 percent, while the value of freight moved by rail between the United States and Mexico was $70 billion, down 15.3 percent.

The top three rail commodities in 2020, which represented 58.9 percent of transborder rail freight, were motor vehicles and parts, valued at $69 billion; mineral fuels, $10 billion; and plastics, $8 billion.

Value of Transborder Freight Rose in December

March 4, 2021

The value of transborder freight moving by rail among the United States, Canada and Mexico increased 1.6 percent to $14.1 billion worth of goods in December 2020 compared with November 2020 the U.S. Bureau of Transportation Statistics reported.

In a news release, BTS said that on a year-over-year basis, freight moved by rail in December decreased 2 percent in value.

The value of freight moved by all modes of transportation in December totaled $96.8 billion, an increase of 0.9 percent compared to the previous month and a gain of 0.4 percent compared  to the same month in 2019.

Rail was the second-most-used mode in December as measured by value, accounting for 14.6 percent of all transborder freight.

In December, $7.4 billion worth of freight was moved by rail between the United States and Canada, up 1.9 percent compared with the previous month but a decline of 7.4 percent compared with the same month in 2019.

The value of freight moving between the U.S. and Mexico was $6.8 billion, up 1.3 percent compared with the previous month and up 4.7 percent compared with December 2019.

More Tank Cars Now Meet Federal Standards

September 26, 2020

A report released this week concludes that 48 percent of railroad tank cars that carried Class 3 flammable liquids in 2019 met the new federal safety requirements, up from 33 percent in 2018.

The report released by the U.S. Bureau of Transportation Statistics tracks the transformation of the fleet carrying Class 3 flammable liquids to be a fleet of DOT-117s, which meet new safety requirements.

In a news release, BTS said some Class 3 flammable liquids are carried in tank cars, such as DOT-111s that have fewer safety features.

DOT-117 compliant tank cars now make up 73 percent of the tank car fleet, up from 46 percent in 2018.

BTS said DOT-111 tank cars, which lack jackets and do not meet the new safety standards, have not carried crude oil since 2016 and the percentage of all other tank car types carrying crude oil dropped from 66 percent in 2017 to 28 percent in 2019, BTS officials said.

Federal law mandated that railroads stop carrying crude oil in DOT-111 tank cars starting in 2018.

The BTS report described the progress of tank car safety upgrades from 2013 through 2019 by tank car type and type of flammable liquid. Class 3 flammable liquids most commonly include crude oil, ethanol and refined petroleum products.

Transborder Freight was Up in February

April 23, 2020

The U.S. Bureau of Transportation Statistics said this week that transborder freight moved by all modes of transportation between the United States, Canada and Mexico rose 1.9 percent to a value of $95.9 billion worth of goods in February compared with February 2019 levels.

Railroad transportation was the second-most used mode, moving $14.4 billion worth of freight during February, a 10.3 percent increase compared with the same period a year ago.

Year over year, freight moved by rail between the United States and Canada rose 2.9 percent to $7.3 billion worth of goods.

Freight moved by rail between the United States and Mexico rose 19.3 percent to $7 billion worth of goods.

In a news release BTS said the U.S.-Mexico rail increase was driven by a 29.6 percent increase in imports of vehicles other than railway. Non-railway vehicles are 76.9 percent of imports by rail from Mexico.

Freight moved by rail in February represented 15 percent of all transborder freight during moved during the month.

Transborder Freight Was Up in January

April 1, 2020

The U.S. Bureau of Transportation Statistics reported last week that transborder freight moved by all modes of transportation between the United States and Canada and Mexico rose 1.5 percent to $97.1 billion worth of goods in January compared with January 2019 levels.

Rail shipments were the second-most used mode and accounted for $13.4 billion of freight during January, a 3.9 percent increase compared with the same period a year ago.

On a year-over-year basis freight moved by rail between the United States and Canada fell 2 percent to $7.4 billion worth of goods.

Freight moved by rail between the United States and Mexico increased 12 percent to $6 billion.

The three busiest rail border ports and value of goods moved in January were in Laredo, Texas, $3.2 billion; Detroit, $2.2 billion; and Eagle Pass, Texas, $1.7 billion.

The top three rail commodities were motor vehicles and parts, worth $6 billion; mineral fuels, worth $1.4 billion; and plastics and articles, worth $700 million.

Those commodities represented 60.2 percent of the total transborder freight moved by rail.