Posts Tagged ‘NKP 765’

NKP 765 Still Expects to Run in 2016

December 23, 2015

In a posting on TrainOrders.com, Rich Melvin said that Nickel Plate Road No. 765 is expected to operate in 2016 and it will have the ability to use Norfolk Southern tracks to make ferry moves.

Melvin, the operations manager for the NKP 765, said that an NS official said that in 2016,  “you guys can do almost anything you want to on NS next year, except run a passenger excursion.”

The Berkshire steam locomotive is owned by the Fort Wayne Railroad Historical Society and operated on the Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad in 2015, 2014, 2013, 2011 and 2010.

“We have an excellent working relationship with NS and we can use NS to deadhead to any other venue we may need to reach,” Melvin wrote. “NKP 765 will have something to do in 2016, even without the opportunity to run passenger excursions on Norfolk Southern.”

Melvin said that NS paid more than $500,000 for the premium on its liability insurance to operate steam excursions this year.

He noted that the railroad business is down right now and the NS stock price is in the mid-80s range, which has resulted in a hostile takeover bid from Canadian Pacific.

“Norfolk Southern has a lot of very important things to work on right now that far out shadow the steam program,” Melvin wrote. “But NS still has the spirit. They recognized that VMT (Virginia Museum of Transportation) had only one year to operate the 611 and are giving them a chance to run up to four weekends of excursions in 2016. That’s a great opportunity for the 611 crew and for VMT. They will do well with it, I’m sure.”

On Photography: Using Foreground Shadows

November 10, 2015

Foreshadowing

Foreshadowing2

Foreshadowing3

Foreshadowing is a tactic used by story tellers, writers and film makers to hint at a plot twist or something that is going to happen later in a story.

It is a way to hold the interest of the listener, reader or viewer as well as move the story along.

It can also be used by photographers to add interest to their images by providing contrast and visual tension.

In the case of photography, the term might be better described as foreground shadowing because you are making use of a shadow in the foreground of the image.

Shown above are two techniques that use foreground shadows to enhance an image.

The top image was made at Boston Mill of Nickel Plate Road No. 765 during a photo runby on the Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad.

The shadow in the foreground resulted from the sun sinking behind the hills and trees behind me.

In this image, the shadow has the effect of covering what otherwise would be empty space.

The reader’s eye is naturally drawn over the shadow to the locomotive, which gleams brightly in contrast to the foreground shadow.

Many photographers would rather that their trains be pristine, meaning free of bystanders cluttering up the environment.

But the 765 was executing a photo runby and the people watching it are part of the story being told by this photo.

Most of those along the tracks watching are also spotlighted by the late day light.

Another way to use foreground shadowing is to allow clouds to provide it.

That is what is happening in the middle photo above that was made of a Wheeling & Lake Erie train awaiting a new crew west of Norwalk.

When I arrived on the scene, a cloud was covering the train in shadows. But the cloud began moving and the shadow moved with it.

What does this foreground shadow add? Compare the middle image with the bottom one.

In the bottom image there is some cloud shadow in the field about half-way between where I am standing and the train.

The foreground shadow of the middle image softens the harshness of the green of the corn crop. Although this image was made just after 4 p.m., the sunlight is still harsh because it is late June.

The foreground shadow also creates a slight illusion of shortening the distance between where I am standing and the train.

As in the case of the image of NKP 765, the foreground shadow also draws the viewer’s eye toward the train because your eyes pass over the shadow. The foreground shadow creates visual tension, which encourages eye movement.

Foreground shadowing is not necessarily something you can set out to create in your photographs.

In the case of the 765 shot, it was a matter of timing. The photo runby occurred when there was still enough direct sunlight to illuminate the train.

Had it occurred a few minutes later, the shadows would be covering the train. As it was, there are some shadows from the trees on the 765.

In the case of the W&LE train, I had the right cloud conditions. I would not have been able to use foreground shadowing in the W&LE train image had it been a clear day.

As is the case in making any image, shadows can hinder your shot or they can be your friend if used in the right way.

How the shadows fall is something to watch for in the environment next time you are out trackside on a sunny day.

Photographs and Commentary by Craig Sanders

765 Owners Looking to 2016 Excursion Season

October 20, 2015

Nickel Plate Road No. 765 is back home again in Indiana for a well-deserved break after rolling up just under 5,000 miles in excursion service in four states.

The 2-8-4 Berkshire won’t be resting for long as there are Santa Claus trains planned for its home in New Haven, which is just east of Fort Wayne.

It has been a busy season for the 765 and Kelly Lynch, the communications director for the Fort Wayne Railroad Historical Society, told a Fort Wayne newspaper that the steamer is unlikely to engage in the series of back-to-back weekend excursion that it made this year.

The 765 would have been even more active had a weekend of trips in Pennsylvania not been canceled due to a dispute over access to tracks on a route that was in the process of being conveyed from Canadian Pacific to Norfolk Southern.

Lynch told the News-Sentinel that the busy schedule took a toll on the volunteers who work on the 765.

“One weekend is a touchdown, two weekends is even better, but by the end of the third weekend many of the volunteers are just looking for the next day to sleep in,” Lynch said. “It really takes a small army to operate the 765.”

That included a core group of 25-30 people that was made up of engineers, locomotive maintenance crew, managers, directors and passenger car hosts.

Various other volunteers joined what Lynch termed the “traveling circus” for a weekend or two in the various locations where the 765 operated.

The Fort Wayne group, which owns the 765, paid for the hotel expenses for 765’s workers.

Lynch said that members of his organization begin planning excursions as many as six months in advance by scouting for locations where the 765 can take on water and sidings on which the gondolas carrying coal can be parked.

“It is challenging to ask an industrial railroad facility of today to provide the type of things we ask,” Lynch said.  “My joke is once we spend hundreds of thousands of dollars on insurance, passenger cars and engine upkeep, the engine becomes pretty self-sustaining. We recreate an entire ecosystem that hasn’t been seen on the American railroad for 60 years.”

Lynch said many of the maintenance practices used by the 765 crew are based on standards that the Nickel Plate Road created in the 1940s and 1950s.

Lynch said next year’s excursion season is in the planning stages although he didn’t provide any specifics other than the 765 might go west.

The 765 pulled excursions in 2011 from the Quad Cities region of Illinois and Iowa, and from St. Louis in 2012.

“There is definitely an appetite [for the 765] out west and terminals out there we have yet to visit,” Lynch said. “The engine has fans everywhere. It all depends on how busy the railroads are. We wouldn’t be able to make all these things happen if the railroad didn’t help us.”

Over the winter, the Fort Wayne group will inspect the 765 and undertake any needed repair and maintenance work.

Lynch said the group had budgeted $250,000 for this work.

There’s a Lot of Work Involved in a Service Stop

October 10, 2015
Parked on the main by the yard. Few hung around, let along made photographs of, the rear of the train. The star was the head end.

Parked on the main by the yard. Few hung around, let along made photographs of, the rear of the train. The star was the head end.

It takes a lot of work to keep a steam locomotive going. The labor-intensive nature of the job is one reason why railroads were so eager to replace steamers with diesels.

There might not be any mainline steam locomotives around today if it were not for volunteers in groups such as the Fort Wayne Railroad Historical Society.

Not only do they maintain Nickel Plate Road No. 765 at the shop in New Haven, Indiana, but they must travel with the 2-8-4 Berkshire and tend to its needs at pre-determined intervals.

Some of those trips have taken the 765 far from its Indiana home. That was the case in early September when the 765 ventured to Steamtown National Historic Site in Scranton, Pennsylvania.

It was a long and at time slow trek back to Ohio from Steamtown for the 765’s next appearance, which was on the Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad.

There were late night arrivals at terminals to tie up and service stops in between.

One of those was in Conneaut, which was once a Nickel Plate town. Conneaut hosted shops and a roundhouse that kept steamers such as the 765 in a state of good repair. The 765 no doubt visited here many times during the steam era.

The lure of photographing a former Nickel Plate steam locomotive working its way over the former Nickel Plate mainline was reason enough to venture out on Sept. 9 to intercept it at multiple locations.

But I also decided to check out the service stop in Conneaut. It occurred on the main adjacent to the yard.

I was somewhat surprised that railroad officials allowed onlookers to mill around back there. It is not a location I would hang out at while doing routine railfanning because it is on railroad property.

But a few dozen people turned out to watch the service stop activities and make photographs of the locomotive and its train of two passengers cars, a tool-crew car and several gondolas used to haul coal.

If any railroad officials were on hand they must have blanched at the site of people wearing open toe footwear as they walked about the scene.

The 765 crew has reached Buffalo earlier that morning at about 4 a.m. after getting hung up on the trip in from Scranton, Pennsylvania.

It would be pushing midnight before they were able to tie ‘er down in Bellevue on this night. The next day it would be onto the Wheeling & Lake Erie for the trip to Akron and CVSR rails.

The word was that the service stop at Conneaut was “scheduled” for 1:30 p.m., but the FtWRHS website notes that during ferry moves schedules cannot be guaranteed.

The 765 reached Conneaut just after 3:30 p.m. and was there for a good hour or so.

As the crew went about its tasks like worker bees, I walked about the site to document the scene, including how the spectators reacted. There is much to see during a service stop and it is not an everyday occurrence.

For all anyone in the crowd knew, this might have been the last time that the 765 will ever visit Conneaut. The future of mainline steam movements can never be assumed, only enjoyed and appreciated in the moment when the opportunity arises.

Article and Photographs by Craig Sanders

Taking on water, which was one reason for stopping in Conneaut.

Taking on water, which was one reason for stopping in Conneaut.

Looking it over to make sure that everything is just right.

Looking it over to make sure that everything is just right.

Everyone has their assigned tasks that need to be completed before the 765 can roll again.

Everyone has their assigned tasks that need to be completed before the 765 can roll again.

How big are those drivers? Just take a look.

How big are those drivers? Just take a look.

Pouring in the journal oil in a ritual as old as the locomotive itself.

Pouring in the journal oil in a ritual as old as the locomotive itself.

Taking a break in the cab on the fireman's side while surveying the crowd.

Taking a break in the cab on the fireman’s side while surveying the crowd.

Telling the story of the 765 to the local media.

Telling the story of the 765 to the local media.

There are many days when the crew must eat on the run. Better have those pizza delivery numbers handy.

There are many days when the crew must eat on the run. Better have those pizza delivery numbers handy.

At times the crew and the locals were able to interact.

At times the crew and the locals were able to interact.

An impromptu photo line.

An impromptu photo line.

Everyone wants to pose with the nose of the NKP 765.

Everyone wants to pose with the nose of the NKP 765.

Parting Shot of the NKP 765 in Copley

October 8, 2015

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It is Oct. 5, 2015, and Nickel Plate Road 765 is passing through Copley on the Wheeling & Lake Erie as she heads home to New Haven, Indiana. This was my last photo of her after she spent time on the Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad this year. While Paul Woodring was behind me taking video, I was taking still photos. Somehow this black and white version has more drama and reality for me.

Photograph by Robert Farkas

Chasing the NKP 765 Ferry Move Toward Home

October 7, 2015
The Nickel Plate Road No. 765 is heading for home in Indiana as it crosses the Huron River's west branch in Monroeville on Monday. It would be a long trip.

The Nickel Plate Road No. 765 is heading for home in Indiana as it crosses the Huron River’s west branch in Monroeville on Monday. It would be a long trip.

On Monday, the Nickel Plate Road No. 765 returned home to Ft Wayne. I was unable to catch it in Akron but was able to get some shots at Monroeville.

It left early for Akron, but after wyeing the train at Mogadore and a crew change for the Wheeling & Lake Erie personnel at Hartland it arrived at Monroeville a few minutes before 3.

Here the 765 made a water and service stop. This takes about 90 minutes, normally, but today the Wheeling had a track crew ahead of the train.

They estimated to be finished around 5 and then the 765 could continue west.

Having some time I went to Bellevue and took pictures at the museum and at the Kemper rail park.

About 5, I went east of Bellevue and found a nice well lighted location. Then I waited and waited. Before long it was 6 p.m. when another railfan told me they were estimating another  two hours before the track would be clear.

This would be after dark so I returned  to Monroeville for some final photos.

Article and Photographs by Todd Dillon

Getting some TLC in Monroeville.

Getting some TLC in Monroeville.

Catching some late day rays as it awaits clearance to proceed.

Catching some late day rays as it awaits clearance to proceed.

The location I picked out to photograph the NKP 765, but which it didn't make during daylight.

The location I picked out to photograph the NKP 765, but which it didn’t make during daylight.

NKP 765 to Make Final CVSR Trips This Weekend

October 1, 2015
Nickel Plate Road No. 765 crosses the Cuyahoga River north of Peninsula during its first run out of Boston Mill last Sunday.

Nickel Plate Road No. 765 crosses the Cuyahoga River north of Peninsula during its first run out of Boston Mill last Sunday.

The CVSR B&O tribute unit pulls a train over Chippewa Creek in Brecksville.

The CVSR B&O tribute unit pulls a train over Chippewa Creek in Brecksville.

Nickel Plate Road No. 765 will make its final trips this weekend on the Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad, bringing to an end an extended run on the road that began in July.

On Saturday, the 765 will pull two-hour excursions that will depart from Akron at 11:30 a.m. and 3 p.m. On Sunday, the excursions will leave Brecksville at 9:30 a.m., 1:30 p.m. and 4:15 p.m.

To purchase tickets, go to the CVSR website at http://www.cvsr.com/steam-in-the-valley

Akron Railroad Club Treasurer Ed Ribinskas sent along these photographs that he made last Sunday while chasing the NKP 765 and the CVSR Scenic train.

Photographs by Edward Ribinskas

 

Another Weekend With NKP 765 in the Cuyahoga Valley. Will it Turn Out to Be the Last of 2015?

September 29, 2015
Getting an elevated view of the Nickel Plate Road 765 as it passes Brecksville Station on a ferry move to Boston Mill on Sunday morning.

Getting an elevated view of the Nickel Plate Road 765 as it passes Brecksville Station on a ferry move to Boston Mill on Sunday morning.

As I reviewed my photographs of the second weekend that Nickel Plate Road No. 765 spent on the Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad, I wondered if this might be the last time that I will have photographed the 765 on the CVSR this year or the last time that I ever photograph the 765 on the CVSR.

The political gamesmanship being played in Congress over extending the federal debt limit might result in a shutdown of the government that would shutter the Cuyahoga Valley National Park as it did for two weeks in October 2013.

That in turn would sideline the CVSR and the 765. Then again, the politicos might strike a deal and the shutdown threat will be over for now. They say that they will, so we shall see.

The 2-8-4 Berkshire built in Lima, Ohio, is slated to run next weekend, pulling trips out of Akron on Saturday and Brecksville on Sunday. Then it returns to its home in New Haven, Indiana, and who knows if it will ever be back.

I’ve been wondering for the past couple of years how many encore performances the 765 will make on the CVSR. It has run here more often than I thought that it might.

I rather enjoy chasing this locomotive and the challenge of getting it in new places or finding new photo angles at old haunts.

I might have more images of the 765 in action than I do of all steam locomotives I’ve photographed combined.

The world of mainline steam locomotives is always uncertain and that has driven me to get out with a “get it while you can” approach.

With that in mind, I chased all three last Sunday out of Boston Mill. Originally billed as half-hour excursions, they wound up being hour and a half trips, perhaps because the ticket prices for the two-hour trips were the same as the half-hour trips. Maybe enough people noticed and complained.

The first and third trips of the day went south while the middle trip went north. That was the pattern last year. What was different, though, was that the 765 twice stood in Peninsula while the northbound Scenic ran around it. It also sat at Fitzwater for the southbound Scenic.

I captured the 765 in two new settings, although, arguably, the first of those wasn’t new as much as it was a new approach.

I’ve seen images of CVSR trains passing Brecksville that were made atop a hill on the south side of Chippewa Creek. This past Sunday I decided to climb the hill and get a new view.

The other setting was the bridge over the Cuyahoga River north of Peninsula. I’ve photographed trains several times on the bridge over the Cuyahoga located south of town, but never to the north.

I always thought that getting to a good vantage point for the north bridge would be too difficult and involve walking through, over and around brush and who knows what else.

Yet the trek to the river’s edge proved to be quite easy and left me wondering why I hadn’t tried it before.

Otherwise, it was another day of catching the 765 at the usual places, including near Deep Lock Quarry and in Peninsula.

I did try a new vantage point at the former, walking south along the tracks to just beyond milepost 52.

Although there were a few hints of autumn color, it seems likely that if the 765 runs next weekend there won’t be as much fall foliage to get as I had hoped when I learned that this year’s run of the 765 on the CVSR would extend into early October.

I would like to add to my 765 catalog some images of the steamer with brilliant fall foliage in the background at Peninsula.

If last weekend’s trips turns out to be the last trips for the 765 on the CVSR I can say that I made the most of the opportunity. You can’t do much better than that.

Article and Photographs by Craig Sanders

Sunday's trips were initially advertised as a half-hour, but by the time Sunday rolled around that had changed to an hour and a half. The ferry move passes the parking lot for the Brecksville station.

Sunday’s trips were initially advertised as a half-hour, but by the time Sunday rolled around that had changed to an hour and a half. The ferry move passes the parking lot for the Brecksville station on Sunday morning.

Between a rock and a milepost south of Deep Lock Quarry. I got a thumbs up from a crew member in the cab on the fireman's side.

Between a rock and a milepost south of Deep Lock Quarry. I got a thumbs up from a crew member in the cab on the fireman’s side.

It is starting to look a little like autumn, which is why I made this image of the 765 going backwards over the Cuyahoga River south of Peninsula.

It is starting to look a little like autumn, which is why I made this image of the 765 going backwards over the Cuyahoga River south of Peninsula.

Passengers on the 12:30 p.m. trip out of Boston Mill had more than a half-hour wait at Fitzwater Yard and Shops before following the Scenic train southward. The 765 leads its train through Brecksville beneath the Ohio Route 82 bridge.

Passengers on the 12:30 p.m. trip out of Boston Mill had more than a half-hour wait at Fitzwater Yard and Shops before following the Scenic train southward. The 765 leads its train through Brecksville beneath the Ohio Route 82 bridge.

Gliding over Chippewa Creek in Brecksville. Fellow ARRC members Peter Bowler and Ed Ribinskas were here with me.

Gliding over Chippewa Creek in Brecksville. Fellow ARRC members Peter Bowler and Ed Ribinskas were here with me.

Crossing the Cuyahoga River north of Peninsula. Two of the three trips out of Boston Mill on this day went south.

Crossing the Cuyahoga River north of Peninsula. Two of the three trips out of Boston Mill on this day went south.

Getting to the site to make this photo turned out to be much easier than I expected.

Getting to the site to make this photo turned out to be much easier than I expected.

Of course cameras were out and people stood and watched as the NKP 765 rolled into Peninsula.

Of course cameras were out and people stood and watched as the NKP 765 rolled into Peninsula.

It wasn't planned, but I'll take credit for the headlight of the 765 reflecting in the fourth window from the left of the far right CVSR passenger car.

It wasn’t planned, but I’ll take credit for the headlight of the 765 reflecting in the fourth window from the left of the far right CVSR passenger car.

This time the 765 was sitting still as the northbound CVSR Scenic passed in Peninsula.

This time the 765 was sitting still as the northbound CVSR Scenic passed in Peninsula. This same ritual had played out in the morning during the first southbound trip of the day pulled by the 765

Trailing out of Peninsula as the last excursion of the day winds down.

Trailing out of Peninsula as the last excursion of the day winds down.

A Sunday Out With NKP 765 on the CVSR

September 26, 2015
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Steam meets diesel at the Peninsula depot. Both of these locomotive are actually vintage, having been built for another generation.

It began with a sense of deja vu. As had been the case last year, I started my day-long chase of Nickel Plate Road No. 765 on the Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad on top of the Ohio Route 82 bridge in Brecksville.

Conditions were strikingly similar to what they had been the year before. A slight fog hung over the valley that would dissipate before the 765 arrived after the first CVSR Scenic train of the day.

A couple of other photographers were also atop the bridge, one of whom knew me by name even though I didn’t know him.

He said he had been to a few Akron Railroad Club meetings and was going to try to duplicate an image I had made in 2014 and posted on the ARRC blog. How is that for getting your day started? I have a fan.

In the cool morning air the 765 was putting on quite the smoke and steam show. After getting my photographs, I walked back through dew on the grass that was so heavy that my shoes were soaked by the time I reached my car.

The next stop was Jaite, where I decided to try a new perspective by standing a ways south of the crossing with Vaughn Road.

I spent several minutes talking with a woman after the passage of the train, filling her in on other places to photograph. She seemed appreciative of the tips, but I didn’t see her the rest of the day.

My next stop was Deep Lock Quarry, which might be my favorite place to watch the 765 as well as photograph it. The train is working up a grade out of Peninsula and putting on quite a sound show.

This year I wanted to get closer to the bridge over the Cuyahoga River. I chatted briefly with another fan, but he then went out south and out of sight. Another guy came jogging down the tracks, asked me where the 765 was, and kept going. He crossed the bridge and vanished.

I had this spot all to myself and it felt like the 765 was putting on a show just for me. Hearing the chug-chug-chug of the locomotive in the still air of early morning was the sensory experience of the day.

I waited for the steam train to return from Howe Meadow and snapped a few more photos. I also waited for the Scenic train to come back north. Even then I still had plenty of time to kill before the next trip.

I sat in the parking lot at Jaite and read the Sunday paper to pass the time. There would be another passage of the CVSR Scenic before the 765 and its train showed up.

Not long before the Scenic arrived, I got out and went to scout for photo locations. I saw a familiar face walking in my direction as I stood near the tracks.

It was fellow Akron Railroad Club member Ed Ribinskas, who was the first person I’d seen on this day who I recognized.

We photographed the Scenic and I went back to my car to change lenses. I wanted to walk a little north from Jaite “station.” By now photographers and onlookers were gathering, some of the latter setting up lawn chairs on the grass as though at an outdoor concert.

The location I picked out was all right, but I wasn’t overly thrilled with the shots that I got. I actually liked Ed’s shots better. He had used more wide angle than I did.

Then it was on to a new location, the bridge over Furnace Run that is opposite of Szalay’s Farm on Riverside Road south of Peninsula.

Ed also planned to shoot there and then call it a day. We made our way down to creek level and soon were joined by another ARRC member, Jeff Troutman.

We got cloud skunked as the 765 came south. So we waited for it go back north, by which time the sun was back out. I bade farewell to Jeff and Ed and went over to Szalay’s to buy a couple of ears of sweet corn.

Then it was off to Peninsula to wait for the third run of the day of the 765. I hadn’t been there long when I heard a locomotive horn that signaled the approach of the northbound Scenic.

I got out to get some photos and spotted ARRC member Bob Farkas. He pointed at FPA-4 No. 6771 and talked about how he had seen this locomotive in Canada many years earlier where it had served Canadian National and, later, VIA Rail Canada.

The last trip of the 765 would be the only one of the three to run ahead of the Scenic. That meant that the two trains would meet in Peninsula.

I shot the 765 and its train moving southbound along Riverview Road north of Boston Mill. I then went to Peninsula to await the meet.

The engineer of the southbound Scenic spotted FPA-4 No. 800 — the Baltimore & Ohio tribute locomotive — in an ideal location. It was parked in sunlight right next to the Peninsula depot. As a result, I made what turned out to be my favorite image of the day. The 765, the 800 and the depot are all lined in a row.

I had been avoiding the photo runbys at Boston Mill all day, but decided to see what I could do for the last go-around.

The first runby was already underway when I arrived. I saw Don Woods and Dave Shepherd photographing the scene and talked with them for a few minutes.

They had seen me earlier on the Route 82 bridge and Don wanted to know what kind of images I was able to get. I showed him a few along with my image of the trains meeting in Peninsula. They had hoped to get that shot, too, but had been standing too far away.

I was better able to plan for the second runby and got some fair to good images. Then it was back up Riverside for one last shot of the 765 across an open field, the same location where I had shot earlier.

By now the late day sunlight was quite brilliant and the clouds had moved out. I had been dodging clouds all day and aside from one spot of bad luck at Furnace Run I had been lucky to have sunlight. You can’t feel bad about that kind of day.

Article and Photographs by Craig Sanders

Passing the dam on the Cuyahoga River at Brecksville that sits nearly directly beneath the Route 82 bridge. If only there weren't as many trees along the water's edge.

Passing the dam on the Cuyahoga River at Brecksville that sits nearly directly beneath the Route 82 bridge. If only there weren’t as many trees along the water’s edge.

Zooming in on the 765 as it nears Brecksville station on the CVSR. How much longer will this area remain open and devoid of trees along the river's bank?

Zooming in on the 765 as it nears Brecksville station on the CVSR. How much longer will this area remain open and devoid of trees along the river’s bank?

Upon further review this might e my second favorite image of the day. Gotta love that smoke and steam plume, which always seems to accompany the train as it approaches Brecksville during the first run of the day.

Upon further review this might be my second favorite image of the day. Gotta love that smoke and steam plume, which always seems to accompany the train as it approaches Brecksville during the first run of the day.

The bridge over the Cuyahoga River reflects in the relatively still waters as the train awaits its passengers in Brecksville.

The bridge over the Cuyahoga River reflects in the relatively still waters as the train awaits its passengers in Brecksville.

I got back a little further at Jaite and used a telephoto. The train is about to cross Vaughn Road.

I got back a little further at Jaite and used a telephoto. The train is about to cross Vaughn Road.

Hearing the 765 work here was even more impressive than seeing it. The train is about to cross the Cuyahoga River south of Peninsula near Deep Lock Quarry.

Hearing the 765 work here was even more impressive than seeing it. The train is about to cross the Cuyahoga River south of Peninsula near Deep Lock Quarry. Note the leaves being kicked to the right of the train.

I liked the symmetry of the leaves at upper left and the shape of the locomotive nose. It just happened.

I liked the symmetry of the leaves at upper left and the shape of the locomotive nose. It just happened.

Another shot of the 765 crossing the bridge over the Cuyahoga River south of Peninsula. This one was made as the train returned to Brecksville.

Another shot of the 765 crossing the bridge over the Cuyahoga River south of Peninsula. This one was made as the train returned to Brecksville.

Crossing Furnace Run on the way back to Brecksville. The red roof in the distance is Szalay's Farm.

Crossing Furnace Run on the way back to Brecksville. The red roof in the distance is Szalay’s Farm.

The last trip out of Brecksville is underway. The view is from along Riverview Road north of Boston Mill.

The last trip out of Brecksville is underway. The view is from along Riverview Road north of Boston Mill.

I've seen the 765 put out more smoke and steam while just running between locations. Shown is the second runby at Boston Mill, which was not overly impressive.

I’ve seen the 765 put out more smoke and steam while just running between locations. Shown is the second runby at Boston Mill, which was not overly impressive.

Surveying the crowd from the cab at the end of the second runby at Boston Mill.

Surveying the crowd from the cab at the end of the second runby at Boston Mill.

Cameras are out as the 765 gets back into position to load passengers after the second runby at Boston Mill station. The orange cones mark the edge of the photo line during the runbys.

Cameras are out as the 765 gets back into position to load passengers after the second runby at Boston Mill station. The orange cones mark the edge of the photo line during the runbys.

One last view across the goldenrod field, except there wasn't much goldenrod to see. At least there was great afternoon light as the 765 rolled backwards.

One last view across the goldenrod field, except there wasn’t much goldenrod to see. At least there was great afternoon light as the 765 rolled backwards.

 

Ed’s Top 3 NKP 765 Photos From Sunday

September 24, 2015
Crossing the Cuyahoga River north of Peninsula with a head of steam.

Crossing the Cuyahoga River north of Peninsula with a head of steam.

Chugging southward at Jaite.

Chugging southward at Jaite.

Crossing Furnace Run en route back to Brecksville.

Crossing Furnace Run en route back to Brecksville.

Several Akron Railroad Club members were out trackside on the Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad on Sunday to photography the Nickel Plate Road No. 765 as it pulled a trio of excursion trips out of Brecksville.

Among them were Ed Ribinskas, Bob Farkas, Don Woods, Dave Shepherd, Jeff Troutman, Paul Woodring and Craig Sanders.

Some of Bob’s images were posted this past Monday. Today, Ed presents his three favorite photographs made during his chase of the NKP 765.

Photographs by Edward Ribinskas


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